Publications by authors named "Muhammad Safwan Ahamad Bustamam"

6 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Comprehensive GCMS and LC-MS/MS Metabolite Profiling of .

Mar Drugs 2020 Jul 17;18(7). Epub 2020 Jul 17.

Laboratory of Natural Products, Institute of Bioscience, Universiti Putra Malaysia, Serdang 43400, Selangor, Malaysia.

The commercial cultivation of microalgae began in the 1960s and was one of the first target organisms. The species has long been considered a potential source of renewable energy, an alternative for phytoremediation, and more recently, as a growth and immune stimulant. However, which is one of the most studied microalga, has never been comprehensively profiled chemically. In the present study, comprehensive profiling of the metabolome grown under normal culture conditions was carried out, employing tandem LC-MS/MS to profile the ethanolic extract and GC-MS for fatty acid analysis. The fatty acid profile of was shown to be rich in omega-6, -7, -9, and -13 fatty acids, with omega-6 being the highest, representing more than sixty percent (>60%) of the total fatty acids. This is a clear indication that this species of could serve as a good source of nutrition when incorporated in diets. The profile also showed that the main fatty acid composition was that of C-C (>92%), suggesting that it might be a potential candidate for biodiesel production. LC-MS/MS analysis revealed carotenoid constituents comprising violaxanthin, neoxanthin, lutein, β-carotene, vulgaxanthin I, astaxanthin, and antheraxanthin, along with other pigments such as the chlorophylls. In addition to these, amino acids, vitamins, and simple sugars were also profiled, and through mass spectrometry-based molecular networking, 48 phospholipids were putatively identified.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/md18070367DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7404257PMC
July 2020

Metabolite Profiles of Red and Yellow Watermelon () Cultivars Using a H-NMR Metabolomics Approach.

Molecules 2020 Jul 15;25(14). Epub 2020 Jul 15.

Laboratory of Natural Products, Institute of Bioscience, Universiti Putra Malaysia, Serdang 43400, Malaysia.

Watermelon, a widely commercialized fruit, is famous for its thirst-quenching property. The broad range of cultivars, which give rise to distinct color and taste, can be attributed to the differences in their chemical profile, especially that of the carotenoids and volatile compounds. In order to understand this distribution properly, water extracts of red and yellow watermelon pulps with predominantly polar metabolites were subjected to proton nuclear magnetic resonance (H-NMR) analysis. Deuterium oxide (DO) and deuterated chloroform (CDCl) solvents were used to capture both polar and non-polar metabolites from the same sample. Thirty-six metabolites, of which six are carotenoids, were identified from the extracts. The clustering of the compounds was determined using unsupervised principal component analysis (PCA) and further grouping was achieved using supervised orthogonal partial least squares discriminant analysis (OPLS-DA). The presence of lycopene, -carotene, lutein, and prolycopene in the red watermelon plays an important role in its differentiation from the yellow cultivar. A marked difference in metabolite distribution was observed between the NMR solvents used as evidenced from the PCA model. OPLS-DA and relative quantification of the metabolites, on the other hand, helped in uncovering the discriminating metabolites of the red and yellow watermelon cultivars from the same solvent system.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/molecules25143235DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7397335PMC
July 2020

Investigation of α-Glucosidase Inhibitory Metabolites from Leaves by GC-MS Metabolite Profiling and Docking Studies.

Biomolecules 2020 02 12;10(2). Epub 2020 Feb 12.

Department of Biomedical Sciences, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, Universiti Putra Malaysia, Serdang 43400, Selangor, Malaysia.

Stone leaf () is a Southeast Asian medicinal plant that has been traditionally used for the management of diabetes mellitus. The underlying mechanisms of the antidiabetic activity have not been fully explored yet. Hence, this study aimed to evaluate the α-glucosidase inhibitory potential of the hydromethanolic extracts of leaves and to characterize the metabolites responsible for such activity through gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) metabolomics. Crude hydromethanolic extracts of different strengths were prepared and in vitro assayed for α-glucosidase inhibition. GC-MS analysis was further carried out and the mass spectral data were correlated to the corresponding α-glucosidase inhibitory IC values via an orthogonal partial least squares (OPLS) model. The 100%, 80%, 60% and 40% methanol extracts displayed potent α-glucosidase inhibitory potentials. Moreover, the established model identified 16 metabolites to be responsible for the α-glucosidase inhibitory activity of . The putative α-glucosidase inhibitory metabolites showed moderate to high affinities (binding energies of -5.9 to -9.8 kcal/mol) upon docking into the active site of isomaltase. To sum up, an OPLS model was developed as a rapid method to characterize the α-glucosidase inhibitory metabolites existing in the hydromethanolic extracts of leaves based on GC-MS metabolite profiling.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/biom10020287DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7072363PMC
February 2020

Identification of Antidiabetic Metabolites from L. Twigs by Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry-Based Metabolomics and Molecular Docking Study.

Biomed Res Int 2019 29;2019:7603125. Epub 2019 May 29.

Laboratory of Natural Product, Institute of Bioscience, Universiti Putra Malaysia, 43400 UPM, Serdang, Selangor, Malaysia.

L. (Rubiaceae) is a climber which is widely distributed in Asian countries including Malaysia. The plant is traditionally used to treat various diseases including diabetes. This study is to evaluate the enzymatic inhibition activity of twigs extracts and to identify the metabolites responsible for the bioactivity by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) metabolomics profiling. Three different twig extracts, namely, hexane (PFH), chloroform (PFC), and methanol (PFM), were submerged for their -amylase and -glucosidase inhibition potential in 5 replicates for each. Results obtained from the loading column scatter plot of orthogonal partial least square (OPLS) model revealed the presence of 12 bioactive compounds, namely, dl--tocopherol, n-hexadecanoic acid, 2-hexyl-1-decanol, stigmastanol, 2-nonadecanone, cholest-8(14)-en-3-ol, 4,4-dimethyl-, (3,5)-, stigmast-4-en-3-one, stigmasterol, 1-ethyl-1-tetradecyloxy-1-silacyclohexane, ɣ-sitosterol, stigmast-7-en-3-ol, (3,5,24S)-, and -monostearin. molecular docking was carried out using the crystal structure -amylase (PDB ID: 4W93) and -glucosidase (PDB ID: 3WY1). -Amylase-n-hexadecanoic acid exhibited the lowest binding energy of -2.28 kcal/mol with two hydrogen bonds residue, namely, LYS178 and TYR174, along with hydrophobic interactions involving PRO140, TRP134, SER132, ASP135, and LYS172. The binding interactions of -glucosidase-n-hexadecanoic acid complex ligand also showed the lowest binding energy among 5 major compounds with the energy value of -4.04 kcal/mol. The complex consists of one hydrogen bond interacting residue, ARG437, and hydrophobic interactions with ALA444, ASP141, GLN438, GLU432, GLY374, LEU373, LEU433, LYS352, PRO347, THR445, HIS348, and PRO351. The study provides informative data on the potential antidiabetic inhibitors identified in twigs, indicating the plant has the therapeutic effect properties to manage diabetes.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2019/7603125DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6560335PMC
January 2020

Metabolite Profiling of the Microalgal Diatom and Correlation with Antioxidant and Nitric Oxide Inhibitory Activities via ¹H NMR-Based Metabolomics.

Mar Drugs 2018 May 7;16(5). Epub 2018 May 7.

Laboratory of Natural Products, Institute of Bioscience, Universiti Putra Malaysia, 43400 Serdang, Selangor, Malaysia.

Microalgae are promising candidate resources from marine ecology for health-improving effects. Metabolite profiling of the microalgal diatom, was conducted by using robust metabolomics tools, namely ¹H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy coupled with multivariate data analysis (MVDA). The unsupervised data analysis, using principal component analysis (PCA), resolved the five types of extracts made by solvents ranging from polar to non-polar into five different clusters. Collectively, with various extraction solvents, 11 amino acids, cholesterol, 6 fatty acids, 2 sugars, 1 osmolyte, 6 carotenoids and 2 chlorophyll pigments were identified. The fatty acids and both carotenoid pigments as well as chlorophyll, were observed in the extracts made from medium polar (acetone, chloroform) and non-polar (hexane) solvents. It is suggested that the compounds were the characteristic markers that influenced the separation between the clusters. Based on partial least square (PLS) analysis, fucoxanthin, astaxanthin, violaxanthin, zeaxanthin, canthaxanthin, and lutein displayed strong correlation to 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) free radical scavenging and nitric oxide (NO) inhibitory activity. This metabolomics study showed that solvent extractions are one of the main bottlenecks for the maximum recovery of bioactive microalgal compounds and could be a better source of natural antioxidants due to a high value of metabolites.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/md16050154DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5983285PMC
May 2018

Stability Study of Algerian Seeds Stored under Different Conditions.

J Anal Methods Chem 2017 1;2017:7891434. Epub 2017 Feb 1.

Laboratory of Natural Products, Institute of Bioscience, Universiti Putra Malaysia, 43400 Serdang, Selangor, Malaysia.

In a study to determine the stability of the main volatile constituents of seeds stored under several conditions, eight storage conditions were established, based on the ecological abiotic effects of air, heat, and light. Six replicates each were prepared and analyzed with Headspace-Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry (HS-GC-MS) for three time points at the initial (1st day (0)), 14th (1), and 28th (2) day of storage. A targeted multivariate analysis of Principal Component Analysis revealed that the stability of the main volatile constituents of the whole seeds was better than that of the ground seeds. Exposed seeds, whole or ground, were observed to experience higher decrement of the volatile composition. These ecofactors of air, heat, and light are suggested to be directly responsible for the loss of volatiles in seeds, particularly of the ground seeds.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2017/7891434DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5309406PMC
February 2017