Publications by authors named "Muhammad Mohsin Altaf"

5 Publications

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Nitrous oxide emission from agricultural soils: Application of animal manure or biochar? A global meta-analysis.

J Environ Manage 2021 May 16;285:112170. Epub 2021 Feb 16.

College of Environment, Hohai University, 210098, Nanjing, China.

Organic amendments (animal manure and biochar) to agricultural soils may enhance soil organic carbon (SOC) contents, improve soil fertility and crop productivity but also contribute to global warming through nitrous oxide (NO) emission. However, the effects of organic amendments on NO emissions from agricultural soils seem variable among numerous research studies and remains uncertain. Here, eighty-five publications (peer-reviewed) were selected to perform a meta-analysis study. The results of this meta-analysis study show that the application of animal manure enhanced NO emissions by 17.7%, whereas, biochar amendment significantly mitigated NO emissions by 19.7%. Moreover, coarse textured soils increased [lnRR‾ = 182.6%, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 151.4%, 217.7%] NO emission after animal manure, in contrast, NO emission mitigated by 7.0% from coarse textured soils after biochar amendment. In addition, this study found that 121-320 kg N ha and ⩽ 30 T ha application rates of animal manure and biochar mitigated NO emissions by 72.3% and 22.5%, respectively. Soil pH also played a vital role in regulating the NO emissions after organic amendments. Furthermore, > 10 soil C: N ratios increased NO emissions by 121.4% and 27.6% after animal and biochar amendments, respectively. Overall, animal manure C: N ratios significantly enhanced NO emissions, while, biochar C: N ratio had not shown any effect on NO emissions. Overall, average NO emission factors (EFs) for animal manure and biochar amendments were 0.46% and -0.08%, respectively. Thus, the results of this meta-analysis study provide scientific evidence about how organic amendments such as animal manure and biochar regulating the NO emission from agricultural soils.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jenvman.2021.112170DOI Listing
May 2021

A global meta-analysis of greenhouse gases emission and crop yield under no-tillage as compared to conventional tillage.

Sci Total Environ 2021 Jan 13;750:142299. Epub 2020 Sep 13.

Department of Soil Science, Faculty of Agriculture, Bahauddin Zakariya University, Multan, Punjab, Pakistan.

No-tillage (NT) practice is extensively adopted with aims to improve soil physical conditions, carbon (C) sequestration and to alleviate greenhouse gases (GHGs) emissions without compromising crop yield. However, the influences of NT on GHGs emissions and crop yields remains inconsistent. A global meta-analysis was performed by using fifty peer-reviewed publications to assess the effectiveness of soil physicochemical properties, nitrogen (N) fertilization, type and duration of crop, water management and climatic zones on GHGs emissions and crop yields under NT compared to conventional tillage (CT) practices. The outcome reveals that compared to CT, NT increased CO, NO, and CH emissions by 7.1, 12.0, and 20.8%, respectively. In contrast, NT caused up to 7.6% decline in global warming potential as compared to CT. However, absence of difference in crop yield was observed both under NT and CT practices. Increasing N fertilization rates under NT improved crop yield and GHGs emission up to 23 and 58%, respectively, compared to CT. Further, NT practices caused an increase of 16.1% CO and 14.7% NO emission in the rainfed areas and up to 54.0% CH emission under irrigated areas as compared to CT practices. This meta-analysis study provides a scientific basis for evaluating the effects of NT on GHGs emissions and crop yields, and also provides basic information to mitigate the GHGs emissions that are associated with NT practice.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.scitotenv.2020.142299DOI Listing
January 2021

Phytomelatonin: An overview of the importance and mediating functions of melatonin against environmental stresses.

Physiol Plant 2021 Jun 18;172(2):820-846. Epub 2020 Nov 18.

Department of Life Sciences, National University of Kaohsiung, Kaohsiung, Taiwan.

Recently, melatonin has gained significant importance in plant research. The presence of melatonin in the plant kingdom has been known since 1995. It is a molecule that is conserved in a wide array of evolutionary distant organisms. Its functions and characteristics have been found to be similar in both plants and animals. The review focuses on the role of melatonin pertaining to physiological functions in higher plants. Melatonin regulates physiological functions regarding auxin activity, root, shoot, and explant growth, activates germination of seeds, promotes rhizogenesis (growth of adventitious and lateral roots), and holds up impelled leaf senescence. Melatonin is a natural bio-stimulant that creates resistance in field crops against various abiotic stress, including heat, chemical pollutants, cold, drought, salinity, and harmful ultra-violet radiation. The full potential of melatonin in regulating physiological functions in higher plants still needs to be explored by further research.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/ppl.13262DOI Listing
June 2021

Both environmental and spatial variables affect bacterial functional diversity in mangrove sediments at an island scale.

Sci Total Environ 2021 Jan 31;753:142054. Epub 2020 Aug 31.

State Key Laboratory of Marine Resource Utilization in South China Sea, Hainan University, Haikou 570228, People's Republic of China; School of Biology, Hainan Normal University, Haikou 571158, People's Republic of China. Electronic address:

Sediment microorganisms are influenced by various biotic and abiotic factors. However, information concerning the spatial factors that determine the functional diversity of sediment bacterial communities at an island scale is limited. Here, we conducted an island-scale study to assess the driving forces governing the functional diversity of sediment bacterial communities in different mangroves around the coast of Hainan Island, southern China. For mangrove sediments in Hainan Island, differences in the metabolic activity and functional diversity among four sites were context dependent, while that showed a trend of East > North > West > South. Furthermore, total carbon, nitrite nitrogen, and salinity are important environmental factors that determine the metabolic functional diversity of bacterial communities. This study also provided important insights for explaining the metabolic functional diversity of bacterial communities in tropical mangrove sediments. The metabolic activity had a significantly response to environmental variables (13.2% of pure variance was explained) and spatial variables (12.4%). More importantly, given that spatial variables may contribute to the bacterial functional as important as environmental variables, this spatial variety of bacterial functional provides new insight into studying bacterial functional biogeographic patterns and impacts on sediment-associated function.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.scitotenv.2020.142054DOI Listing
January 2021

Biogeochemical transformation of greenhouse gas emissions from terrestrial to atmospheric environment and potential feedback to climate forcing.

Environ Sci Pollut Res Int 2020 Nov 8;27(31):38513-38536. Epub 2020 Aug 8.

State Key Laboratory of Marine Resource Utilization in South China Sea, College of Ecology and Environment, Hainan University, Haikou, 570228, People's Republic of China.

Carbon dioxide (CO) is mainly universal greenhouse gas associated with climate change. However, beyond CO, some other greenhouse gases (GHGs) like methane (CH) and nitrous oxide (NO), being two notable gases, contribute to global warming. Since 1900, the concentrations of CO and non-CO GHG emissions have been elevating, and due to the effects of the previous industrial revolution which is responsible for climate forcing. Globally, emissions of CO, CH, and NO from agricultural sectors are increasing as around 1% annually. Moreover, deforestation also contributes 12-17% of total global GHGs. Perhaps, the average temperature is likely to increase globally, at least 2 °C by 2100-by mid-century. These circumstances are responsible for climate forcing, which is the source of various human health diseases and environmental risks. From agricultural soils, rhizospheric microbial communities have a significant role in the emissions of greenhouse gases. Every year, microbial communities release approximately 1.5-3 billion tons of carbon into the atmospheric environment. Microbial nitrification, denitrification, and respiration are the essential processes that affect the nitrogen cycle in the terrestrial environment. In the twenty-first century, climate change is the major threat faced by human beings. Climate change adversely influences human health to cause numerous diseases due to their direct association with climate change. This review highlights the different anthropogenic GHG emission sources, the response of microbial communities to climate change, climate forcing potential, and mitigation strategies through different agricultural management approaches and microbial communities.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11356-020-10151-1DOI Listing
November 2020