Publications by authors named "Mostafa Araj-Khodaei"

10 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Reply to M-L Puhlmann and WM de Vos.

Adv Nutr 2020 09;11(5):1401-1402

Department of History of Medicine, School of Traditional Medicine, Tabriz University of Medical Sciences, Iran.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/advances/nmaa065DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7490216PMC
September 2020

The Anti-Inflammatory Effect of Pistacia Lentiscus in a Rat Model of Colitis.

J Inflamm Res 2020 22;13:369-376. Epub 2020 Jul 22.

Department of Traditional Pharmacy, School of Traditional medicine, Tabriz University of Medical Sciences, Tabriz, Iran.

Introduction: The mastic tree (Pistacia lentiscus), belonging to the Anacardiaceae family, has anti-inflammatory and antioxidant properties. This study aims to assay the anti-inflammatory effects of mastic in rats with colitis.

Methods: Forty-eight male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into six groups of control, colitis without treatment, colitis with mastic (400 mg/kg/daily) administered orally or intra-rectally, colitis with prednisolone (5 mg/kg of body weight), and colitis with sesame oil for seven successive days. Treatment effects were evaluated by determining cytokines (TNFα, IL6) and myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity, macroscopic scores, and histopathological parameters. The results of each group are compared with colitis without treatment group.

Results: After administering sesame oil, the MPO level was reduced significantly compared to colitis without the treatment group (P=0.025). The mastic oil (400 mg/kg orally) administration was effective in reducing colitis severity through the reduction in the total colitis index (p=0.046) after 7 days. The Intra-rectal administration of mastic decreased TNF-α significantly, similar to prednisolone and control groups compared to the colitis without treatment group (p=0.024). The IL-6 did not change in the mastic and sesame oil groups.

Conclusion: According to our results, mastic and sesame oil have anti-inflammatory properties, suggesting that they could be used as natural sources to lessen the ulcerative colitis inflammation.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.2147/JIR.S259035DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7383024PMC
July 2020

The role of hippocampal GABA receptors on anxiolytic effects of Echium amoenum extract in a mice model of restraint stress.

Mol Biol Rep 2020 Sep 10;47(9):6487-6496. Epub 2020 Aug 10.

Neurosciences Research Center, Tabriz University of Medical Sciences, Tabriz, 5166614756, Iran.

Echium amoenum (EA), a popular medicinal plant in Persian medicine, has anxiolytic, antioxidant, sedative, and anti-inflammatory effects. This study examined whether GABA-ergic signaling is involved in the anxiolytic effects of EA in mice. Sixty BALB/c mice (25-30 g) were divided into six groups (n = 10) as follows: the (I) control group received 10 ml/kg normal saline (NS). In the stress groups, the animals underwent 14 consecutive days of restraint stress (RS), and received following treatments simultaneously; (II) RS + NS; (III) RS + Diaz (Diazepam); (IV) RS + EA; (V) RS + Flu (Flumazenil) + EA; (VI) RS + Flu + Diaz. Behavioral tests including the open field test (OFT) and elevated plus maze (EPM) were performed to evaluate anxiety-like behaviors and the effects of the regimens. The plasma level of corticosterone and the hippocampal protein expressions of IL-1β, TNF-α, CREB, and BDNF, as well as p-GABA/GABA ratio, were also assessed. The findings revealed that chronic administration of EA alone produced anxiolytic effects in both behavioral tests, while diazepam alone or in combination with Flu failed to decrease the anxiety-like behaviors. Furthermore, the p-GABA/GABA and p-CREB/CREB ratios, and protein levels of BDNF were significantly increased in the EA-received group. On the other hand, plasma corticosterone levels and the hippocampal IL-1β and TNF-α levels were significantly decreased by EA. However, pre-treatment with GABA receptors (GABA Rs) antagonist, Flu, reversed the anxiolytic and molecular effects of EA in the RS-subjected animals. Our findings confirmed that alternation of GABAR is involved in the effects of EA against RS-induced anxiety-like behaviors, HPA axis activation, and neuroinflammation.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11033-020-05699-7DOI Listing
September 2020

A double-blind, randomized pilot study for comparison of Melissa officinalis L. and Lavandula angustifolia Mill. with Fluoxetine for the treatment of depression.

BMC Complement Med Ther 2020 Jul 3;20(1):207. Epub 2020 Jul 3.

Department of Traditional Medicine, School of Medicine, Shahed University, 1471, North Kargar, Engelab Square, Tehran, Iran.

Background: Depression has rapidly progressed worldwide, and the need for an efficient treatment with low side effect has risen. Melissa officinalis L and Lavandula angustifolia Mill have been traditionally used in Asia for the treatment of depression. Many textbooks of traditional Persian medicine refer to these herbs for the treatment of depression while there are no adequate clinical trials to support this claim. The present study aimed to evaluate the efficacy of M. officinalis and L. angustifolia compared to fluoxetine for the treatment of mild to moderate depression in an 8-week randomized, double-blind clinical trial.

Methods: Forty-five adult outpatients who met the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, 5th edition (DSM-5) for major depression, were randomly assigned to 3 groups to daily receive either M. officinalis (2 g) or L. angustifolia (2 g) or fluoxetine (20 mg) and were assessed in weeks 0, 2, 4 and 8 by the Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression (HAM-D) including 17 items.

Results: Our study showed that M. officinalis and L. angustifolia effect similar to fluoxetine in mild to moderate depression. (F = 0.131, df = 2,42, p = 0.877).

Conclusion: Due to some restrictions in this study including absence of placebo group, large-scale trials are needed to investigate the anti-depressant effect of these two herbs with more details.

Trial Registration: IRCT2014061718126N1 . Registration date: 2015-06-04-"Retrospectively registered".
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12906-020-03003-5DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7333290PMC
July 2020

Nano-based delivery systems for berberine: A modern anti-cancer herbal medicine.

Colloids Surf B Biointerfaces 2020 Oct 8;194:111188. Epub 2020 Jun 8.

Wellman Center for Photomedicine, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA, 02114, USA; Department of Dermatology, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, 02115, USA; Laser Research Centre, Faculty of Health Science, University of Johannesburg, Doornfontein 2028, South Africa. Electronic address:

Berberine (BBR) is an isoquinoline alkaloid belonging to the structural class of protoberberines. BBR has been used in traditional medicine to treat diseases, such as type 2 diabetes and hypercholesterolemia. BBR inhibits cancer cell growth and induces apoptosis. However, BBR has significant drawbacks as a chemotherapeutic agent, including poor solubility, and induction of drug resistance, limiting its application in chemotherapy. Hence, combination therapy could not only deal with the problems related to single-agent chemotherapy but could also improve the therapeutic index of anticancer drugs. Co-administration of drugs may show pharmaceutical incompatibility due to conflicting physicochemical features. BBR can be used in nanoparticle-based single drug delivery, and in co-delivery systems designed to accommodate drugs and deliver them simultaneously into cancer cells. In this review, we will summarize the use of BBR, including BBR as a single chemotherapeutic agent and the combination of BBR with traditional anti-cancer drugs or herbal medicines in nanoparticle-based delivery systems.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.colsurfb.2020.111188DOI Listing
October 2020

Clinical effects of date palm (Phoenix dactylifera L.): A systematic review on clinical trials.

Complement Ther Med 2020 Jun 14;51:102429. Epub 2020 May 14.

Department of Persian Medicine, School of Traditional Medicine, Tabriz University of Medical Sciences, Tabriz, Iran. Electronic address:

Purpose: The aim of present study was to review and categorize the clinical trials investigating the clinical effects of different botanical parts of dates compared with any controls.

Methods: All clinical trials (randomized, pilot, quasi-experimental, cross-over. and non-randomized clinical trials) evaluating the clinical effects of date palm from 2000 until August 2019 in English and Persian languages were included in this systematic review. The methodological quality of the included studies was evaluated according to the risk of bias assessment of Cochrane handbook of systematic reviews, and then reported using Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analysis (PRISMA) statement.

Results: Twenty-six studies met the inclusion criteria. Studies were performed in 8 categories based on different botanical parts of date palm. These categories were obstetrics, gynecology, oncology, dermatology, hematology, gastroenterology, endocrinology, metabolism, and infertility. A total of 38 % of included studies were randomized controlled trials. Further, 80 % of the included studies had performance and detection bias. Finally, about 50 % of them had selection bias and about 20 % had attrition and reporting bias.

Conclusion: The widespread consumption of date palm as medicinal and botanical plant suggests the importance of this plant in human healthcare. The clinical trials conducted so far have explained a number of clinical effects of date palm. However, there is not enough clinical evidence to support the clinical effects in other review articles and traditional medical systems, and further randomized controlled trials with robust designs and methods are required.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ctim.2020.102429DOI Listing
June 2020

Letter to the editor regarding "Galen's place in Avicenna's The Canon of Medicine: Respect, confirmation and criticism".

J Integr Med 2020 05 19;18(3):274. Epub 2020 Mar 19.

Department of History of Medicine, School of Traditional Medicine, Tabriz University of Medical Sciences, Tabriz 5166614766, Iran. Electronic address:

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.joim.2020.03.002DOI Listing
May 2020

Melissa officinalis L. hydro-alcoholic extract inhibits anxiety and depression through prevention of central oxidative stress and apoptosis.

Exp Physiol 2020 04 21;105(4):707-720. Epub 2020 Feb 21.

Neurosciences Research Center (NSRC), Tabriz University of Medical Sciences, Tabriz, Iran.

New Findings: What is the central question of this study? How does an extract of Melissa officinalis L. ameliorate anxiety- and depressive-like behaviour of mice? What is the main finding and its importance? An extract of Melissa officinalis L. possessed anxiolytic and anti-depressant effects, which could mainly be mediated through its antioxidant and anti-apoptotic properties.

Abstract: This study evaluated the effects of a hydro-alcoholic extract of Melissa officinalis (HAEMO) on anxiety- and depressive-like behaviours, oxidative stress and apoptosis markers in restraint stress-exposed mice. In order to induce a depression-like model, mice were subjected to restraint stress (3 h day for 14 days) and received normal saline or HAEMO (50, 75 and 150 mg kg  day ) for 14 days. The administered doses of HAEMO were designated based on the concentration of one of the main phenolic compounds present in the extract, rosmarinic acid (2.55 mg kg at lowest dose); other phytochemical analyses including assays for antioxidant activity, total phenols and flavonoids were also carried out. The behavioural changes in an open field task, elevated plus maze, tail suspension and forced swimming tests were evaluated. Also, malondialdehyde (MDA) levels and enzyme activities of superoxide dismutase and glutathione peroxidase, and total antioxidant capacity were assessed in the prefrontal cortex and hippocampus. Moreover, levels of Bcl-2, Bax and caspase 3 in the brain as well as serum concentration of corticosterone were evaluated. HAEMO (75 and 150 mg kg ) significantly reversed anxiety- and depressive-like behaviours. Also, HAEMO reduced MDA levels, enhanced enzymatic antioxidant activities and restored serum levels of corticosterone. An immunoblotting analysis also demonstrated that HAEMO decreased levels of pro-apoptotic markers and increased anti-apoptotic protein levels in the prefrontal cortex and hippocampus of restraint stress-exposed mice. Our findings suggested that HAEMO reduced inflammation and had anxiolytic and antidepressant effects in mice.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1113/EP088254DOI Listing
April 2020

Avicenna (980-1037 CE) and his Early Description and Classification of Dementia.

J Alzheimers Dis 2019 ;71(4):1093-1098

Department of Clinical Medicine, University of Southern Denmark, Odense, Denmark.

According to the World Health Organization (WHO), dementia is a disorder that occurs as result of a neurodegenerative process in brain, and usually is chronic or progressive by nature. Most descriptions of senile dementia date back to Alois Alzheimer. In 1906, Alzheimer described the first patient, Auguste Deter, who suffered from the disorder that later became known as Alzheimer's disease. Although, the history of the disease before 1906 is quite rich, little has been said about the contributions of ancient and medieval physicians to the understanding of dementia. Over the centuries, the concept of senile dementia changed from an inevitable mental decline with aging, to different sets of clinical features with narrow limits of diagnosis of a disease in its own right. Documentation of the historical origins of prevention, diagnosis, and therapies of dementia would make an important contribution to a more complete understanding of this pathological degeneration of dementia. The present review focuses on the contributions of Avicenna (AD 980-1037) to the development of diagnosis and the discovery of etiology of different forms of dementia, with the goal of revealing the extent to which dementia was understood in the golden age of Islam in Persia.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3233/JAD-190345DOI Listing
November 2020

First Report of a Disease by Rhazes 10 Centuries Ago.

Int J Prev Med 2019 15;10. Epub 2019 Jan 15.

Department of Anesthesiology and Intensive Care Medicine, Tabriz University of Medical Sciences, Tabriz, Iran.

Introduction: Abu Bakr Mohammad Ibn Zakariya Al-Razi (865-925 CE), who was known as "Rhazes" in the west, was a famous scientist of medieval ages. He has more than 200 books and treatises. His masterpiece on medicine "" contains around 900 case reports. Some of the diseases which seem to be recently reported have been stated previously, but not well described. Considering symptoms of the patient described at that time, differential diagnosis will be discussed.

Case Presentation: Rhazes described a patient with bilious fever. He had developed bloody urine and stool on the fourth day and fatigue. Subsequently, the patient's urine and stool color turned into dark and black, respectively, and died the following day. According to Rhazes attitude, it was malignant measles. Meyerhof in his book has referred to post-measles acute glomerulonephritis, but more appropriate differential diagnoses are compatible with this patient.

Discussion: One of the best diagnoses for this case can be Weil's syndrome. Presence of fever, icterus, hemorrhage and renal injury, all suggest Weil's syndrome without pulmonary involvement. The other probable diagnosis is thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP). Meningococcal sepsis is the other possible diagnosis.

Conclusion: To sum up, as three compatible diseases with the case; have been described more than a thousand years after Rhazes (Weil's syndrome 1886, TTP 1925 and meningococcemia 1805); if the case is either Weil's or TTP or meningococcal sepsis, it is the first report of the disease in the world by Rhazes.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.4103/ijpvm.IJPVM_216_17DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6360843PMC
January 2019