Publications by authors named "Mostafa Almasi-Dooghaee"

6 Publications

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Cerebral venous sinus thrombosis associated with COVID-19: a case series and literature review.

J Neurol 2021 Feb 22. Epub 2021 Feb 22.

Clinical Neurology Research Center, Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, P.O.Box: 7193635899, Shiraz, Iran.

Background: Since the emergence of COVID-19 pandemic, several cases of cerebral venous sinus thrombosis (CVST) have been reported in SARS-CoV-2 infected individuals.

Methods: Consecutive patients with documented SARS-CoV-2 infection, as well as clinical and radiological characteristics of CVST, were reported from three teaching hospitals in the South West, North West, and the center of Iran between June and July 2020. We also searched the abstract archives until the end of August 2020 and gathered 28 reported cases. The diagnostic criteria for SARS-CoV-2 infection were determined according to SARS-CoV-2 detection in oropharyngeal or nasopharyngeal samples in clinically suspected patients. Demographics, prominent COVID-19 symptoms, confirmatory tests for SARS-CoV-2 infection diagnosis, the interval between the diagnosis of SARS-CoV-2 infection and CVST, clinical and radiological features of CVST, therapeutic strategies, CVST outcomes, rate of hemorrhagic transformation, and mortality rate were investigated.

Results: Six patients (31-62 years-old) with confirmed CVST and SARS-CoV-2 infection were admitted to our centers. Four patients had no respiratory symptoms of SARS-CoV-2 infection. Five patients developed the clinical manifestations of CVST and SARS-CoV-2 infection simultaneously. Three patients had known predisposing factors for CVST. Despite receiving CVST and SARS-CoV-2 infection treatments, four patients died. SARS-COV-2 associated CVST patients were older (49.26 vs. 37.77 years-old), had lower female/male ratio (1.42 vs. 2.19), and higher mortality rate (35.29% vs. 6.07%) than CVST not associated with COVID-19.

Conclusions: The role of SARS-CoV-2 as a "cause" versus an "additive contributor" remains to be elucidated. Practitioners should be aware of the possibility of CVST in SARS-CoV-2 infection.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00415-021-10450-8DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7897893PMC
February 2021

Neuropsychiatric manifestations of COVID-19 can be clustered in three distinct symptom categories.

Sci Rep 2020 12 1;10(1):20957. Epub 2020 Dec 1.

Rasoul Akram Hospital Clinical Research Development Center (RCRDC), Iran University of Medical Sciences, Sattarkhan St, Tehran, Iran.

Several studies have reported clinical manifestations of the new coronavirus disease. However, few studies have systematically evaluated the neuropsychiatric complications of COVID-19. We reviewed the medical records of 201 patients with confirmed COVID-19 (52 outpatients and 149 inpatients) that were treated in a large referral center in Tehran, Iran from March 2019 to May 2020. We used clustering approach to categorize clinical symptoms. One hundred and fifty-one patients showed at least one neuropsychiatric symptom. Limb force reductions, headache followed by anosmia, hypogeusia were among the most common neuropsychiatric symptoms in COVID-19 patients. Hierarchical clustering analysis showed that neuropsychiatric symptoms group together in three distinct groups: anosmia and hypogeusia; dizziness, headache, and limb force reduction; photophobia, mental state change, hallucination, vision and speech problem, seizure, stroke, and balance disturbance. Three non-neuropsychiatric cluster of symptoms included diarrhea and nausea; cough and dyspnea; and fever and weakness. Neuropsychiatric presentations are very prevalent and heterogeneous in patients with coronavirus 2 infection and these heterogeneous presentations may be originating from different underlying mechanisms. Anosmia and hypogeusia seem to be distinct from more general constitutional-like and more specific neuropsychiatric symptoms. Skeletal muscular manifestations might be a constitutional or a neuropsychiatric symptom.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41598-020-78050-6DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7708626PMC
December 2020

Agenesis of the corpus callosum: a rare association with Ehlers-Danlos syndrome.

Iran J Child Neurol 2020 ;14(4):95-99

Department of Neurology, Firoozgar Hospital, Iran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran.

Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS) is a rare congenital disorder of connective tissues which involves the skin and musculoskeletal system. There are also some reports for the involvement of the central and peripheral nervous systems. We want to present a very rare coassociation of EDS, spondylolisthesis, and Agenesis of the corpus callosum in an Iranian lady.
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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7660029PMC
January 2020

The role of transcranial sonography in differentiation of dementia subtypes: an introduction of a new diagnostic method.

Neurol Sci 2021 Jan 8;42(1):275-283. Epub 2020 Jul 8.

Department of Neurology, Firoozgar Hospital, Iran University of Medical Sciences, Valadi St, Valiasr St, Tehran, Iran.

Purpose: Transcranial sonography (TCS) is increasingly used for the diagnosis of neurodegenerative disorders. We assessed the role of third ventricle width (TVW), midbrain area (MA), and midbrain circumference (MC) by TCS for diagnosis and differentiation of dementia.

Methods: A cross-sectional study was designed in 59 patients with dementia including 19 patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD), 10 Dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB), 23 Frontotemporal dementia (FTD) and 7 Vascular dementia (VaD), and 22 normal-cognition individuals. Both case and control groups were matched by age, sex, and educational level. The dementia patients were divided into two subgroups: cortical-dominant dementia (CDD) including AD and FTD; and subcortical-dominant dementia (SDD) including DLB and VaD. TCS was performed through a temporal window, in which the size of TVW and midbrain was measured by trans-thalamic and trans-mesencephalic planes, respectively.

Results: The mean TVW was 0.85 ± 0.3 cm and 0.66 ± 0.2 cm in dementia patients and the control group, respectively (p < 0.01). The MA/MC were smaller in dementia patients compared with the control group (p < 0.05 and p < 0.01). The TVW in CDD (p = 0.003) and SDD (p = 0.027), but only MA/MC in SDD (p < 0.05), was statistically different compared with the control group.

Conclusion: The measurement of TVW and midbrain size by TCS can be used for diagnosis and differentiation of dementia. Patients with CDD and SDD have larger TVW than the control group, whereas patients with SDD have smaller midbrain sizes.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10072-020-04566-4DOI Listing
January 2021

Childhood Laryngeal Dystonia Following Bilateral Globus Pallidus Abnormality: A Case Study and Review of Literature.

Iran J Otorhinolaryngol 2017 Jan;29(90):47-52

Department of Neurology, Iran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran.

Introduction: Dystonia is a disorder of movement caused by various etiologies. Laryngeal dystonia is caused by the spasm of laryngeal muscles. It is a disorder caused by vocal fold movement in which excessive adduction or abduction of the vocal folds occurs during speech. The pathophysiology of this type of dystonia is not fully known. Some researchers have suggested that basal ganglia structures and their connections with cortical areas have been involved in the pathogenesis of dystonia.

Case Report: In this paper a 7.5-year-old boy suffering from laryngeal dystonia with bilateral lesions in Globus Pallidus is presented. The patient also suffered from swallowing problems, monotone voice, vocal tremor, hypersensitivity of gag reflex, and stuttering. Drug treatment failed to cure him; therefore, he was referred to rehabilitation therapy.

Conclusion: In conclusion, special attention should be brought upon laryngeal dystonia, especially in patients showing Extra-pyramidal symptoms and/or abnormalities of the basal ganglia. In children, laryngeal dystonia may be potentially fatal. Lack of consideration for this condition during rehabilitation therapy can lead to serious consequences for a child.
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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5307305PMC
January 2017

Childhood Neurogenic Stuttering Due to Bilateral Congenital Abnormality in Globus Pallidus: A Case Report and Review of the Literature.

Iran J Child Neurol 2016 ;10(4):75-79

Department of Neurology, Iran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran.

The basal ganglia are a group of structures that act as a cohesive functional unit. They are situated at the base of the forebrain and are strongly connected with the cerebral cortex and thalamus. Some speech disorders such as stuttering can resulted from disturbances in the circuits between the basal ganglia and the language motor area of the cerebral cortex. Stuttering consists of blocks, repetitive, prolongation or cessation of speech. We present a 7.5 -year-old male child with bilateral basal ganglia lesion in globus pallidus with unclear reason. The most obvious speech disorders in patient was stuttering, but also problems in swallowing, monotone voice, vocal tremor, hypersensitivity of gag reflex and laryngeal dystonia were seen. He has failed to respond to drug treatment, so he went on rehabilitation therapy when his problem progressed. In this survey, we investigate the possible causes of this type of childhood neurogenic stuttering.
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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5100041PMC
January 2016