Publications by authors named "Monika Shpokayte"

3 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Adult Human Glioblastomas Harbor Radial Glia-like Cells.

Stem Cell Reports 2020 02 30;14(2):338-350. Epub 2020 Jan 30.

Department of Neurosurgery, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY 10065, USA. Electronic address:

Radial glia (RG) cells are the first neural stem cells to appear during embryonic development. Adult human glioblastomas harbor a subpopulation of RG-like cells with typical RG morphology and markers. The cells exhibit the classic and unique mitotic behavior of normal RG in a cell-autonomous manner. Single-cell RNA sequencing analyses of glioblastoma cells reveal transcriptionally dynamic clusters of RG-like cells that share the profiles of normal human fetal radial glia and that reside in quiescent and cycling states. Functional assays show a role for interleukin in triggering exit from dormancy into active cycling, suggesting a role for inflammation in tumor progression. These data are consistent with the possibility of persistence of RG into adulthood and their involvement in tumor initiation or maintenance. They also provide a putative cellular basis for the persistence of normal developmental programs in adult tumors.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.stemcr.2020.01.007DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7014025PMC
February 2020

Artificially Enhancing and Suppressing Hippocampus-Mediated Memories.

Curr Biol 2019 06 23;29(11):1885-1894.e4. Epub 2019 May 23.

Department of Psychological and Brain Sciences, Boston University, Boston, MA 02215, USA. Electronic address:

Emerging evidence indicates that distinct hippocampal domains differentially drive cognition and emotion [1, 2]; dorsal regions encode spatial, temporal, and contextual information [3-5], whereas ventral regions regulate stress responses [6], anxiety-related behaviors [7, 8], and emotional states [8-10]. Although previous studies demonstrate that optically manipulating cells in the dorsal hippocampus can drive the behavioral expression of positive and negative memories, it is unknown whether changes in cellular activity in the ventral hippocampus can drive such behaviors [11-14]. Investigating the extent to which distinct hippocampal memories across the longitudinal axis modulate behavior could aid in the understanding of stress-related psychiatric disorders known to affect emotion, memory, and cognition [15]. Here, we asked whether tagging and stimulating cells along the dorsoventral axis of the hippocampus could acutely, chronically, and differentially promote context-specific behaviors. Acute reactivation of both dorsal and ventral hippocampus cells that were previously active during memory formation drove freezing behavior, place avoidance, and place preference. Moreover, chronic stimulation of dorsal or ventral hippocampal fear memories produced a context-specific reduction or enhancement of fear responses, respectively, thus demonstrating bi-directional and context-specific modulation of memories along the longitudinal axis of the hippocampus. Fear memory suppression was associated with a reduction in hippocampal cells active during retrieval, while fear memory enhancement was associated with an increase in basolateral amygdala activity. Together, our data demonstrate that discrete sets of cells throughout the hippocampus provide key nodes sufficient to bi-directionally reprogram both the neural and behavioral expression of memory.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.cub.2019.04.065DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6548647PMC
June 2019