Dr  Monica Bonilla-Salinas, PhD - Universités de Provence et de la Méditerranée - PhD Microbiologie Moleculaire et biotechnologies

Dr Monica Bonilla-Salinas

PhD

Universités de Provence et de la Méditerranée

PhD Microbiologie Moleculaire et biotechnologies

marsella, marsella | France

Main Specialties: Medical Microbiology

Additional Specialties: molecular microbiology

Dr  Monica Bonilla-Salinas, PhD - Universités de Provence et de la Méditerranée - PhD Microbiologie Moleculaire et biotechnologies

Dr Monica Bonilla-Salinas

PhD

Introduction

Primary Affiliation: Universités de Provence et de la Méditerranée - marsella, marsella , France

Specialties:

Additional Specialties:

Publications

6Publications

22Reads

3Profile Views

10PubMed Central Citations

Anaerobic methanethiol degradation and methanogenic community analysis in an alkaline (pH 10) biological process for liquefied petroleum gas desulfurization.

Biotechnol Bioeng. 2008 Nov 1;101(4):691-701. doi: 10.1002/bit.21933.

Biotechnol Bioeng

Anaerobic methanethiol (MT) degradation by mesophilic (30 degrees C) alkaliphilic (pH 10) communities was studied in a lab-scale Upflow Anaerobic Sludge Bed (UASB) reactor inoculated with a mixture of sediments from the Wadden Sea (The Netherlands), Soap Lake (Central Washington), and Russian soda lakes. MT degradation started after 32 days of incubation. During the first 252 days, complete degradation was achieved till a volumetric loading rate of 7.5 mmol MT/L/day, and sulfide, methane, and carbon dioxide were the main reaction products. Temporary inhibition of MT degradation occurred after MT peak loads and in the presence of dimethyl disulfide (DMDS), which is the autooxidation product of MT. From day 252 onwards, methanol was dosed to the reactor as co-substrate at a loading rate of 3-6 mmol/L/day to stimulate growth of methylotrophic methanogens. Methanol was completely degraded and also a complete MT degradation was achieved till a volumetric loading rate of 13 mmol MT/L/day (0.77 mmol MT/gVSS/day). However, from day 354 till the end of the experimental run (day 365), acetate was formed and MT was not completely degraded anymore, indicating that methanol-degrading homoacetogenic bacteria had partially outcompeted the methanogenic MT-degrading archea. The archeal community in the reactor sludge was analyzed by DGGE and sequencing of 16S rRNA genes. The methanogenic archea responsible for the degradation of MT in the reactor were related to Methanolobus oregonensis. A pure culture, named strain SODA, was obtained by serial dilutions in medium containing both trimethyl amine and dimethyl sulfide (DMS). Strain SODA degraded MT, DMS, trimethyl amine, and methanol. Flow sheet simulations revealed that for sufficient MT removal from liquefied petroleum gas, the extraction and biological degradation process should be operated above pH 9.

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November 2008
10 Reads

Methanethiol degradation in anaerobic bioreactors at elevated pH (8): reactor performance and microbial community analysis.

Bioresour Technol. 2008 Dec;99(18):8967-73. doi: 10.1016/j.biortech.2008.05.007. Epub 2008 Jun 17

Bioresour Technol.

The degradation of methanethiol (MT) at 30 degrees C under saline-alkaline (pH 8-10, 0.5M Na(+)) conditions was studied in a lab-scale Upflow Anaerobic Sludge Blanket (UASB) reactor inoculated with estuarine sediment from the Wadden Sea (The Netherlands). At a sodium concentration of 0.5M and a pH between 8 and 9 complete MT degradation to sulfide, methane and carbon dioxide was possible at a maximum loading rate of 22mmolMTL(-1)day(-1) and a hydraulic retention time of 6h. The presence of yeast extract (100mg/L) in the medium was essential for complete MT degradation. 16S rRNA based DGGE and sequence analysis revealed that species related to the genera Methanolobus and Methanosarcina dominated the archaeal community in the reactor sludge. Their relative abundance fluctuated in time, possibly as a result of the changing operational conditions in the reactor. The most dominant MT-degrading archaeon was enriched from the reactor and obtained in pure culture. This strain WR1, which was most closely related to Methanolobus taylorii, degraded MT, dimethyl sulfide (DMS), methanol and trimethylamine. Its optimal growth conditions were 0.2M NaCl, 30 degrees C and pH 8.4. In batch and reactor experiments operated at pH 10, MT was not degraded.

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June 2008
9 Reads

Isolation and identification of killer yeasts from sugar cane molasses

Letters in Applied Microbiology Volume 21, Issue 2, pages 115–116, August 1995

Letters in Applied Microbiology Volume 21, Issue 2, pages 115–116, August 1995

A total of 13 yeast strains were isolated from 10 samples of sugar cane molasses obtained from sugar mills in Mexico; nine of them were killer strains. There was at least one killer strain in every sample. The resulting species were the following: Torulaspora delbrueckii (2), Schizosaccharomyces pombe (7), Cryptococcus albidus var. albidus (1) and Saccharomyces cerevisiae (3). A new killer species is reported: Schizosaccharomyces pombe.

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June 2008
9 Reads

Mahella australiensis gen. nov., sp. nov., a moderately thermophilic anaerobic bacterium isolated from an Australian oil well.

Int J Syst Evol Microbiol 2004 Nov;54(Pt 6):2169-73

IRD, UR 101 Extrêmophiles, IFR-BAIM, Universités de Provence et de la Méditerranée, ESIL, Marseille, France.

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Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1099/ijs.0.02926-0DOI Listing
November 2004
9 Reads
2 Citations
2.511 Impact Factor

Petrobacter succinatimandens gen. nov., sp. nov., a moderately thermophilic, nitrate-reducing bacterium isolated from an Australian oil well.

Int J Syst Evol Microbiol 2004 May;54(Pt 3):645-9

IRD, UR 101 Extrêmophiles, IFR-BAIM, Universités de Provence et de la Méditerranée, ESIL, Marseille, France.

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Source
http://ijs.microbiologyresearch.org/content/journal/ijsem/10
Publisher Site
http://dx.doi.org/10.1099/ijs.0.02732-0DOI Listing
May 2004
13 Reads
8 Citations
2.511 Impact Factor

Isolation from oil reservoirs of novel thermophilic anaerobes phylogenetically related to Thermoanaerobacter subterraneus: reassignment of T. subterraneus, Thermoanaerobacter yonseiensis, Thermoanaerobacter tengcongensis and Carboxydibrachium pacificum to Caldanaerobacter subterraneus gen. nov., sp.

Int J Syst Evol Microbiol. 2004 Mar;54(Pt 2):467-74.

Int J Syst Evol Microbiol.

Novel thermophilic, anaerobic, Gram-positive, rod-shaped bacteria, strains SL9 and OCA1, were isolated from oilfields in France and Australia, respectively. Both strains, together with Thermoanaerobacter yonseiensis KB-1(T) (=DSM 13777(T)), Thermoanaerobacter tengcongensis MB4(T) (=DSM 15242(T)) and Carboxydibrachium pacificum JM(T) (=DSM 12653(T)), possessed genomic (DNA-DNA hybridization studies) and phylogenetic similarities with Thermoanaerobacter subterraneus SEBR 7858(T) (=DSM 13054(T)), which was isolated recently from an oilfield reservoir in south-west France. Marked phenotypic differences exist between the three oilfield isolates (T. subterraneus, strain OCA1 and strain SL9): they include temperature range for growth and substrates used. Differences were also observed in the DNA G+C contents of all organisms. Similarly to T. subterraneus, strains SL9 and OCA1, and also T. yonseiensis, T. tengcongensis and Carboxydibrachium pacificum, produced acetate and L-alanine as major end products of glucose metabolism [0.8-1.0 mol L-alanine produced (mol glucose consumed)(-1)] and reduced thiosulfate, but not sulfate, to sulfide. Because of these significant metabolic and phylogenetic differences between the oilfield isolates (T. subterraneus, strain OCA1 and strain SL9), T. yonseiensis, T. tengcongensis and Carboxydibrachium pacificum and other Thermoanaerobacter species, it is proposed to reassign them as a novel genus and species, Caldanaerobacter subterraneus gen. nov., sp. nov., comb. nov., with the creation of four novel subspecies, Caldanaerobacter subterraneus subsp. subterraneus subsp. nov., comb. nov., Caldanaerobacter subterraneus subsp. yonseiensis subsp. nov., comb. nov., Caldanaerobacter subterraneus subsp. tengcongensis subsp. nov., comb. nov. and Caldanaerobacter subterraneus subsp. pacificus subsp. nov., comb. nov.

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March 2004
8 Reads

Top co-authors

Bernard Ollivier
Bernard Ollivier

Mediterranean Institute of Oceanography (MIO)

2
Pierre Thomas
Pierre Thomas

Université Lille Nord de France

2
Laurence Casalot
Laurence Casalot

Universités de Provence et de la Méditerranée

1