Publications by authors named "Monica L Marvin"

10 Publications

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Improving access to cancer genetic services: perspectives of high-risk clients in a community-based setting.

J Community Genet 2020 Jan 24;11(1):119-123. Epub 2019 Apr 24.

Department of Human Genetics, University of Michigan, 4909 Buhl Building, 1241 E Catherine St, Ann Arbor, MI, 48109-5618, USA.

Cancer genetic services are underutilized by high-risk clients in community-based health settings. To understand this disparity, 108 Planned Parenthood high-risk clients completed a utilization-focused survey. Clients expressed interest (78.8%) and intention (75.0%) in seeking genetic services. Personal/familial implications for cancer risk were the strongest motivators for seeking services (63.0-79.6%). Finances (39.6%) and worry (37.0%) were the biggest barriers. To reduce disparities in access to cancer genetics services, clinicians must understand clients' concerns and tailor their recommendations.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s12687-019-00420-zDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6962404PMC
January 2020

A human MUTYH variant linking colonic polyposis to redox degradation of the [4Fe4S] cluster.

Nat Chem 2018 08 18;10(8):873-880. Epub 2018 Jun 18.

University of Southern California Norris Comprehensive Cancer Center, Los Angeles, CA, USA.

The human DNA repair enzyme MUTYH excises mispaired adenine residues in oxidized DNA. Homozygous MUTYH mutations underlie the autosomal, recessive cancer syndrome MUTYH-associated polyposis. We report a MUTYH variant, p.C306W (c.918C>G), with a tryptophan residue in place of native cysteine, that ligates the [4Fe4S] cluster in a patient with colonic polyposis and family history of early age colon cancer. In bacterial MutY, the [4Fe4S] cluster is redox active, allowing rapid localization to target lesions by long-range, DNA-mediated signalling. In the current study, using DNA electrochemistry, we determine that wild-type MUTYH is similarly redox-active, but MUTYH C306W undergoes rapid oxidative degradation of its cluster to [3Fe4S], with loss of redox signalling. In MUTYH C306W, oxidative cluster degradation leads to decreased DNA binding and enzyme function. This study confirms redox activity in eukaryotic DNA repair proteins and establishes MUTYH C306W as a pathogenic variant, highlighting the essential role of redox signalling by the [4Fe4S] cluster.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41557-018-0068-xDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6060025PMC
August 2018

Outcomes of genetic evaluation for hereditary cancer syndromes in unaffected individuals.

Fam Cancer 2015 Mar;14(1):167-74

Division of Molecular Medicine and Genetics, Department of Internal Medicine, University of Michigan, 300 North Ingalls SPC 5419, NI3 A08, Ann Arbor, MI, 48109, USA,

Genetic testing (GT) for inherited cancer predisposition is most informative when initiated in individuals with cancer, thus standard practice recommends GT start in an affected individual. This strategy can be frustrating for unaffected consultands and providers. Retrospective review of cases was performed to compare outcomes of testing the unaffected consultand and recommending that testing start in an affected relative. Records from cancer-free consultands (N = 101), presenting to the University of Michigan Cancer Genetics Clinic between 6/1/2011 and 12/30/2011 were reviewed. All genetics records for these consultands were reviewed through 3/31/2013 for GT recommendations (117 total). The unaffected consultand was offered testing in 14.5 % of cases, testing was completed in 64.7 % of these with one mutation identified. Of consultands tested initially, 70.5 % received cancer-screening recommendations based on family history and test results. Testing was recommended to start in an affected family member in 30.7 % of cases. Fifty percent returned to clinic with information on an affected family member; 83.3 % documented that their family member underwent GT with one mutation identified. Consultands reported the affected family member refused testing in 22.2 % and two of these consultands subsequently pursued GT, identifying one mutation. Fifty percent of cases where testing the family member first was recommended were lost to follow-up with 66.6 % of these never given cancer-screening recommendations. Cancer genetic risk evaluation of healthy consultands should consider the option of pursuing GT in the unaffected consultand and should implement a plan for tailored risk management in the absence of informative genetic evaluation within the family.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10689-014-9756-xDOI Listing
March 2015

The clinical phenotype of SDHC-associated hereditary paraganglioma syndrome (PGL3).

J Clin Endocrinol Metab 2014 Aug 23;99(8):E1482-6. Epub 2014 Apr 23.

Department of Internal Medicine, Divisions of Metabolism Endocrinology and Diabetes (T.E., R.J.A.), Molecular Medicine and Genetics (J.N.E., V.M.R.), and Gastroenterology (E.M.S.), Department of Human Genetics (M.L.M.), and Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery (H.A.A.) at the University of Michigan Hospital and Health Systems, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109; and Norris Cancer Center (S.B.G.), University of Southern California, Los Angeles, California 90033.

Context: Mutations in the genes encoding subunits of the succinate dehydrogenase complex cause hereditary paraganglioma syndromes. Although the phenotypes associated with the more commonly mutated genes, SDHB and SDHD, are well described, less is known about SDHC-associated paragangliomas.

Objective: To describe functionality, penetrance, number of primary tumors, biological behavior, and location of paragangliomas associated with SDHC mutations.

Design: Families with an SDHC mutation were identified through a large cancer genetics registry. A retrospective chart review was conducted with a focus on patient and tumor characteristics. In addition, clinical reports on SDHC-related paragangliomas were identified in the medical literature to further define the phenotype and compare findings.

Setting: A cancer genetics clinic and registry at a tertiary referral center.

Patients: Eight index patients with SDHC-related paraganglioma were identified.

Results: Three of the eight index patients had mediastinal paraganglioma and four of the eight patients had more than one paraganglioma. Interestingly, the index patients were the only affected individuals in all families. When combining these index cases with reported cases in the medical literature, the mediastinum is the second most common location for SDHC-related paraganglioma (10% of all tumors), occurring in up to 13% of patients.

Conclusions: Our findings suggest that thoracic paragangliomas are common in patients with SDHC mutations, and imaging of this area should be included in surveillance of mutation carriers. In addition, the absence of paragangliomas among at-risk relatives of SDHC mutation carriers suggests a less penetrant phenotype as compared to SDHB and SDHD mutations.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1210/jc.2013-3853DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4121019PMC
August 2014

Identification of genetic counseling service delivery models in practice: a report from the NSGC Service Delivery Model Task Force.

J Genet Couns 2013 Aug 25;22(4):411-21. Epub 2013 Apr 25.

Cancer Genetics Risk Assessment Program, St. Vincent Hospital, 8301 Harcourt Rd #100, Indianapolis, IN 46260, USA.

Increasing demand for genetic services has resulted in the need to evaluate current service delivery models (SDMs) and consider approaches that improve access to and efficiency of genetic counseling (GC). This study aimed to describe SDMs currently used by the GC community. The NSGC membership was surveyed regarding the use of four SDMs: in-person GC, telephone GC, group GC, and telegenetics GC. Variables related to access and components of use were also surveyed, including: appointment availability, time-per-patient, number of patients seen, billing, and geographic accessiblity. Seven hundred one usable responses were received. Of these, 54.7 % reported using an in-person SDM exclusively. The remainder (45.3 %) reported using multiple SDMs. Telephone, group and telegenetics GC were used often or always by 8.0 %, 3.2 % and 2.2 % of respondents, respectively. Those using an in-person SDM reported the ability to see the highest number of patients per week (p < 0.0001) and were the most likely to bill in some manner (p < 0.0001). Those using telegenetic and telephone GC served patients who lived the furthest away, with 48.3 % and 35.8 %% respectively providing GC to patients who live >4 h away. This study shows that genetic counselors are incorporating SDMs other than traditional in-person genetic counseling, and are utilizing more than one model. These adaptations show a trend toward shorter wait time and shorter length of appointments. Further study is indicated to analyze benefits and limitations of each individual model and factors influencing the choice to adopt particular models into practice.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10897-013-9588-0DOI Listing
August 2013

10 rare tumors that warrant a genetics referral.

Fam Cancer 2013 Mar;12(1):1-18

St. Joseph Hospital, Cancer Genetics Program, Orange, CA 92868, USA.

The number of described cancer susceptibility syndromes continues to grow, as does our knowledge on how to manage these syndromes with the aim of early detection and cancer prevention. Oncologists now have greater responsibility to recognize patterns of cancer that warrant referral for a genetics consultation. While some patterns of common cancers are easy to recognize as related to hereditary cancer syndromes, there are a number of rare tumors that are highly associated with cancer syndromes yet are often overlooked given their infrequency. We present a review of ten rare tumors that are strongly associated with hereditary cancer predisposition syndromes: adrenocortical carcinoma, carcinoid tumors, diffuse gastric cancer, fallopian tube/primary peritoneal cancer, leiomyosarcoma, medullary thyroid cancer, paraganglioma/pheochromocytoma, renal cell carcinoma of chromophobe, hybrid oncocytoic, or oncocytoma histology, sebaceous carcinoma, and sex cord tumors with annular tubules. This review will serve as a guide for oncologists to assist in the recognition of rare tumors that warrant referral for a genetic consultation.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10689-012-9584-9DOI Listing
March 2013

Report from the National Society of Genetic Counselors service delivery model task force: a proposal to define models, components, and modes of referral.

J Genet Couns 2012 Oct 8;21(5):645-51. Epub 2012 May 8.

Cancer Genetics Risk Assessment Program, St. Vincent Hospital, Indianapolis, IN 46260, USA.

The Service Delivery Model Task Force (SDMTF) was appointed in 2009 by the leadership of the National Society of Genetic Counselors (NSGC) with a charge to research and assess the capacity of all existing service delivery models to improve access to genetic counseling services in the context of increasing demand for genetic testing and counseling. In approaching this charge, the SDMTF found that there were varying interpretations of what was meant by "service delivery models" and the group held extensive discussions about current practices to arrive at consensus of proposed definitions for current genetic service delivery models, modes of referral and components of service delivery. The major goal of these proposed definitions is to allow for conversations to begin to address the charge to the committee. We propose that current models of service delivery can be defined by: 1) the methods in which genetic counseling services are delivered (In-person, Telephone, Group and Telegenetics), 2) the way they are accessed by patients (Traditional referral, Tandem, Triage, Rescue and Self-referral) and 3) the variable components that depend upon multiple factors unique to each service setting. This report by the SDMTF provides a starting point whereby standardized terminology can be used in future studies that assess the effectiveness of these described models to overcome barriers to access to genetic counseling services.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10897-012-9505-yDOI Listing
October 2012

Clinical use of the Surgeon General's "My Family Health Portrait" (MFHP) tool: opinions of future health care providers.

J Genet Couns 2011 Oct 24;20(5):510-25. Epub 2011 Jun 24.

Department of Pediatrics and Communicable Diseases, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109-5718, USA.

This study examined medical students' and house officers' opinions about the Surgeon General's "My Family Health Portrait" (MFHP) tool. Participants used the tool and were surveyed about tool mechanics, potential clinical uses, and barriers. None of the 97 participants had previously used this tool. The average time to enter a family history was 15 min (range 3 to 45 min). Participants agreed or strongly agreed that the MFHP tool is understandable (98%), easy to use (93%), and suitable for general public use (84%). Sixty-seven percent would encourage their patients to use the tool; 39% would ensure staff assistance. Participants would use the tool to identify patients at increased risk for disease (86%), record family history in the medical chart (84%), recommend preventive health behaviors (80%), and refer to genetics services (72%). Concerns about use of the tool included patient access, information accuracy, technical challenges, and the need for physician education on interpreting family history information.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10897-011-9381-xDOI Listing
October 2011

AXIN2-associated autosomal dominant ectodermal dysplasia and neoplastic syndrome.

Am J Med Genet A 2011 Apr 17;155A(4):898-902. Epub 2011 Mar 17.

Department of Human Genetics, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan, USA.

We describe a family with a novel, inherited AXIN2 mutation (c.1989G>A) segregating in an autosomal dominant pattern with oligodontia and variable other findings including colonic polyposis, gastric polyps, a mild ectodermal dysplasia phenotype with sparse hair and eyebrows, and early onset colorectal and breast cancers. This novel mutation predicts p.Trp663X, which is a truncated protein that is missing the last three exons, including the DIX (Disheveled and AXIN interacting) domain. This nonsense mutation is predicted to destroy the inhibitory action of AXIN2 on WNT signaling. Previous authors have described an unrelated family with autosomal dominant oligodontia and a variable colorectal phenotype segregating with a nonsense mutation of AXIN2, as well as a frameshift AXIN2 mutation in an unrelated individual with oligodontia. Our report provides additional evidence supporting an autosomal dominant AXIN2-associated ectodermal dysplasia and neoplastic syndrome.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ajmg.a.33927DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3094478PMC
April 2011

Diagnosis and management of hereditary paraganglioma syndrome due to the F933>X67 SDHD mutation.

Head Neck 2009 May;31(5):689-94

Department of Human Genetics, University of Michigan Medical School, Ann Arbor, MI, USA.

Background: The hereditary paraganglioma syndromes (PGLs) are autosomal dominant conditions with an increased risk for tumors of the sympathetic and parasympathetic neuroendocrine systems. The recognition of patients with hereditary PGL and identification of the responsible gene are important for the management of index patients and family members.

Methods: We present the clinical, radiological, biochemical, and family history findings of a 15-year-old boy patient with a glomus vagale versus glomus jugulare tumor.

Results: Evaluation of the family history and the patient's history led to the identification of a familial succinate dehydrogenase subunit D (SDHD) gene mutation (F933>X67), consistent with a diagnosis of hereditary PGL1. Although this family had all head and neck tumors, this SDHD mutation has previously been described in a family with primarily functional pheochromocytomas.

Conclusions: This case report highlights the variable expressivity of a single mutation in SDHD, (F933>X67). Careful and comprehensive screening is warranted for individuals at risk.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/hed.20930DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4758329PMC
May 2009