Publications by authors named "Monica Grzelak"

3 Publications

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Anterior Cervical Discectomy and Fusion: A Surgical Intervention for Treating Cervical Disc Disease.

AORN J 2021 03;113(3):237-251

Cervical disc disease includes chronic disc degeneration, stenosis, spondylosis, and disc herniation; providers initially treat these conditions conservatively through symptomatic care. When conservative measures fail, surgery may be indicated. It is important to explore all the surgical options available and the risks and benefits of each procedure. An anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF) is a procedure involving the removal of disc material to achieve neural tissue decompression and placement of a bone graft or interbody implant and a cervical plate and screws to stabilize the spinal column at one or more vertebral levels. This article briefly reviews the anatomy of the spine and treatment options for cervical disc disease; presents an in-depth review of the ACDF procedure, including the expected perioperative course and care considerations; and concludes with a case report of a 37-year-old woman who underwent an ACDF at the C5-C6 and C6-C7 vertebral levels of the spine.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/aorn.13329DOI Listing
March 2021

Reply to comment on "An antidepressant decreases CSF Aβ production in healthy individuals and in transgenic AD mice".

Sci Transl Med 2014 Dec;6(268):268lr4

Department of Neurology, Washington University, St. Louis, MO 63110, USA. Knight Alzheimer's Disease Research Center, Washington University Medical Center, St. Louis, MO 63110, USA. Hope Center for Neurological Disorders, Washington University, St. Louis, MO 63110, USA.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1126/scitranslmed.3010609DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4778730PMC
December 2014

An antidepressant decreases CSF Aβ production in healthy individuals and in transgenic AD mice.

Sci Transl Med 2014 May;6(236):236re4

Department of Neurology, Washington University, St. Louis, MO 63110, USA. Knight Alzheimer's Disease Research Center, Washington University Medical Center, St. Louis, MO 63110, USA. Hope Center for Neurological Disorders, Washington University, St. Louis, MO 63110, USA.

Serotonin signaling suppresses generation of amyloid-β (Aβ) in vitro and in animal models of Alzheimer's disease (AD). We show that in an aged transgenic AD mouse model (APP/PS1 plaque-bearing mice), the antidepressant citalopram, a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor, decreased Aβ in brain interstitial fluid in a dose-dependent manner. Growth of individual amyloid plaques was assessed in plaque-bearing mice that were chronically administered citalopram. Citalopram arrested the growth of preexisting plaques and reduced the appearance of new plaques by 78%. In healthy human volunteers, citalopram's effects on Aβ production and Aβ concentrations in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) were measured prospectively using stable isotope labeling kinetics, with CSF sampling during acute dosing of citalopram. Aβ production in CSF was slowed by 37% in the citalopram group compared to placebo. This change was associated with a 38% decrease in total CSF Aβ concentrations in the drug-treated group. The ability to safely decrease Aβ concentrations is potentially important as a preventive strategy for AD. This study demonstrates key target engagement for future AD prevention trials.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1126/scitranslmed.3008169DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4269372PMC
May 2014