Publications by authors named "Molly Rosebush"

16 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Microsecretory Adenocarcinoma of Salivary Glands: An Expanded Series of 24 Cases.

Head Neck Pathol 2021 May 12. Epub 2021 May 12.

Department of Pathology, UT Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX, USA.

Microsecretory adenocarcinoma (MSA) is a recently described salivary gland tumor with a characteristic histologic and immunophenotypic profile and recurrent MEF2C-SS18 fusions. Because only six cases of MSA have been published, its complete clinicopathologic spectrum is unclear, and its biologic behavior has not been documented. Here, we present an updated and expanded experience of 24 MSA cases. All cases of MSA were obtained from the authors' files. Immunohistochemistry for S100, SOX10, p63, p40, SMA, calponin, and mammaglobin was performed. Molecular analysis was performed by targeted RNA sequencing, SS18 break apart fluorescence in situ hybridization, and/or reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction for MEF2C-SS18 fusion. Clinical follow-up was obtained from medical records. A total of 24 MSA cases were collected, from 13 women and 11 men, ranging from 17 to 83 years (mean 49.5 years). The vast majority (23 of 24) arose in the oral cavity, with the palate (n = 14) and buccal mucosa (n = 6) as the most frequent subsites. Tumors showed consistent histologic features including: (1) microcystic tubules, (2) flattened intercalated duct-like cells, (3) monotonous oval hyperchromatic nuclei, (4) abundant basophilic luminal secretions, (5) fibromyxoid stroma, and (6) circumscribed borders with subtle infiltration. The tumors were very consistently positive for S100 (24 of 24), p63 (24 of 24), and SOX10 (14 of 14) and negative for p40 (0 of 21), calponin (0 of 12) and mammaglobin (0 of 16), while SMA (4 of 20) was variable. MEF2C-SS18 fusion was demonstrated in 21 of 24 cases; in the remaining 3 cases with insufficient RNA, SS18 break apart FISH was positive. Treatment information was available in 17 cases, all of which were managed with surgery only. In 14 cases with follow-up (1-216 months, mean 30), no cases recurred or metastasized. MSA is a distinct salivary gland neoplasm with remarkably consistent clinical, histologic, immunophenotypic, and genetic features that generally behaves in an indolent manner following surgery alone. These observations solidify MSA as a unique, low-grade salivary gland carcinoma that warrants inclusion in the next version of the WHO classification of head and neck tumors.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s12105-021-01331-7DOI Listing
May 2021

Oral mucosal burning and pain: the diagnostic challenge.

Gen Dent 2020 Jul-Aug;68(4):18-22

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June 2020

Black and Brown: Non-neoplastic Pigmentation of the Oral Mucosa.

Head Neck Pathol 2019 Mar 22;13(1):47-55. Epub 2019 Jan 22.

Louisiana State University, 1100 Florida Avenue, New Orleans, LA, 70119, USA.

Black and brown pigmentation of the oral mucosa can occur due to a multitude of non-neoplastic causes. Endogenous or exogenous pigments may be responsible for oral discoloration which can range from innocuous to life-threatening in nature. Physiologic, reactive, and idiopathic melanin production seen in smoker's melanosis, drug-related discolorations, melanotic macule, melanoacanthoma and systemic diseases are presented. Exogenous sources of pigmentation such as amalgam tattoo and black hairy tongue are also discussed. Determining the significance of mucosal pigmented lesions may represent a diagnostic challenge for clinicians. Biopsy is indicated whenever the source of pigmentation cannot be definitively identified based on the clinical presentation.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s12105-018-0980-9DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6405786PMC
March 2019

Detection of human papillomavirus DNA in formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded squamous papillomas of the oral cavity.

J Clin Exp Dent 2018 Oct 1;10(10):e979-e983. Epub 2018 Oct 1.

DDS, MS, Assistant Professor of Oral and Maxillofacial Pathology, Louisiana State University, New Orleans, LA, USA.

Background: Squamous papillomas are exophytic proliferations of surface oral epithelium. Human papillomavirus (HPV) infection is widely accepted as the etiology of squamous papillomas however the virus cannot be detected in a significant percentage of lesions.

Material And Methods: Using polymerase chain reaction (PCR), we tested 35 formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) squamous papillomas for the presence of HPV DNA.

Results: Six papillomas (17%) tested positive for HPV DNA; four contained HPV-6 and two contained HPV-11. Given that β-globin DNA was only identified in half of the samples, DNA degradation appears to have significantly impacted the results.

Conclusions: The results likely represent an underestimation of the true number of HPV-positive specimens in our study. Potential explanations for HPV-negative squamous papillomas include transient HPV infection, failure of the experiment to detect HPV if present, or the possibility that some lesions may not result from HPV infection. HPV, PCR, FFPE, papilloma, oral.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.4317/jced.55187DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6203908PMC
October 2018

Oral Mycosis Fungoides: A Report of Three Cases and Review of the Literature.

Head Neck Pathol 2019 Sep 26;13(3):492-499. Epub 2018 Apr 26.

Louisiana State University, 1100 Florida Avenue, New Orleans, LA, 70119, USA.

Mycosis fungoides (MF) and Sézary syndrome are clonal T-cell proliferations that exhibit skin homing and represent the majority of cutaneous T-cell lymphomas. Early MF is a diagnostic challenge as both the clinical and microscopic features often mimic benign inflammatory conditions. Oral MF is very rare and has been associated in the past with advanced disease and a poor prognosis. Skin lesions are present for an average of > 6 years before oral involvement occurs. The clinical appearance is highly variable with tongue, palate and gingiva most often affected. We report 3 additional cases of oral MF, including one in which oral lesions are the initial disease presentation. Survival in patients presenting with oral MF is improving and can be attributed to advances in therapy.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s12105-018-0923-5DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6684724PMC
September 2019

Peripheral giant cell granulomas: a series of 279 cases.

Oral Surg Oral Med Oral Pathol Oral Radiol 2014 Oct 5;118(4):475-82. Epub 2014 Jul 5.

Assistant Professor, Department of Periodontics, Louisiana State University Health Science Center School of Dentistry, New Orleans, LA, USA.

Objective: This study investigated the demographic, clinicopathologic, and histopathologic findings of lesions diagnosed as peripheral giant cell granuloma (PGCG) by the Louisiana State University Oral Pathology Biopsy Service from 1974 to 2011.

Study Design: Clinical, demographic, and histopathologic evaluation was completed for 279 cases. A follow-up questionnaire was mailed to all surgeons who performed these biopsies from 1990 to 2011.

Results: Of the 279 lesions, 58% occurred in the mandible, 44% occurred in the anterior portion of the arches, 83% were adjacent to teeth, 14% occurred in edentulous areas, and 2% were adjacent to implants. Average duration was 10.5 months, and the average size was 12.7 mm. The recurrence rate was 17.5%. Histopathologically, 78% of lesions extended to the base of the specimen, 50% exhibited ulceration, 41% contained calcifications, and 6% exhibited features overlapping with another pathologic entity.

Conclusions: PGCG is a well-defined pathologic entity among reactive gingival lesions. Recurrent lesions were more likely to contain calcifications.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.oooo.2014.06.004DOI Listing
October 2014

Odontogenic keratocyst: a case report and review of an old lesion with new classification.

J Tenn Dent Assoc 2012 Fall-Winter;92(2):33-6; quiz 37-8

Department of Periodontology, College of Dentistry, University of Tennessee Health Science Center, Memphis, TN, USA.

The odontogenic keratocyst (OKC) is distinctive among jaw cysts given its tendency toward recurrence and aggressive clinical behavior. This paper presents a well-documented case of OKC and a review of the diagnostic features, treatment modalities and new evidence supporting the reclassification and renaming of this unique pathologic process.
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March 2013

Mandibular abnormalities in a patient with neurofibromatosis type 1.

J Tenn Dent Assoc 2012 ;92(1):29-31; quiz 32-3

Department of Biologic and Diagnostic Sciences, College of Dentistry, University of Tennessee Health Science Center, Memphis, TN, USA.

Neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) is an autosomal dominant disorder characterized by the presence of cutaneous neurofibromas, multiple cafd-au-lait spots and pigmented nodules of the iris known as Lisch nodules. In some cases, the diagnosis can be made at birth while in others the diagnosis is made later in life based on the appearance of additional criteria. We describe radiographic abnormalities of the mandible in a young adult male with NF1.
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August 2012

Oral cancer: enduring characteristics and emerging trends.

J Mich Dent Assoc 2012 Feb;94(2):64-8

Department of Biologic and Diagnostic Sciences and Center for Integrative Cancer Research, University of Tennessee Health Science Center, Memphis, Tennessee, USA.

Oral cancer is arguably the most serious condition that dental providers may encounter in their practice. The relatively poor prognosis associated with oral cancer highlights the importance of the dental team's awareness of the disease. While many characteristics of oral cancer have endured over time, new research is revealing trends that are changing the way we approach its screening, diagnosis and treatment. In this report, we provide a translational overview of oral cancer, including risk factors, signs and symptoms, clinical management, as well as our recent findings on the role of chronic inflammation in the development of the disease. In addition, our recent genetic profiling approach in both cancer cell lines and in patients has identified potential biomarkers, molecular pathways and therapeutic drugs for oral squamous cell carcinomas. This comprehensive review should be of interest to all dental professionals.
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February 2012

Slow-growing gingival mass.

Oral Surg Oral Med Oral Pathol Oral Radiol 2012 Feb 20;113(2):161-7. Epub 2012 Jan 20.

Biologic and Diagnostic Sciences, College of Dentistry, University of Tennessee Health Science Center, Memphis, Tennessee, USA.

Objectives: A 33-year-old woman presented with a slow growing palatal gingival mass. The clinical differential diagnosis included benign tumors and tumor-like lesions, including the pyogenic granuloma, peripheral giant cell granuloma, peripheral ossifying fibroma, giant cell fibroma, peripheral odontogenic tumors, and oral focal mucinosis.

Study Design: The lesion was excised and histopathological examination followed by immunohistochemical staining was carried out.

Results: The microscopic findings and the immunohistochemical reactivity was diagnostic for a nerve sheath myxoma.

Conclusions: The clinical features, microscopic findings, immunohistochemistry, and the differential diagnosis including the relationship to the neurothekeoma are discussed.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.tripleo.2011.07.037DOI Listing
February 2012

Oral cancer: enduring characteristics and emerging trends.

J Tenn Dent Assoc 2011 ;91(2):24-7; quiz 28-9

Department of Biologic and Diagnostic, University of Tennessee Health Science Center, Memphis, Tennessee, USA.

Oral cancer is arguably the most serious condition that dental providers may encounter in their practice. The relatively poor prognosis associated with oral cancer highlights the importance of the dental team's awareness of the disease. While many characteristics of oral cancer have endured over time, new research is revealing trends that are changing the way we approach its screening, diagnosis and treatment. In this report, we provide a translational overview of oral cancer, including risk factors, signs and symptoms, clinical management, as well as our recent findings on the role of chronic inflammation in the development of the disease. In addition, our recent genetic profiling approach in both cancer cell lines and in patients has identified potential biomarkers, molecular pathways and therapeutic drugs (Velcade and Aspirin) for oral squamous cell carcinomas. This comprehensive review should be of interest to all dental professionals.
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July 2011

Pro-inflammatory genes as biomarkers and therapeutic targets in oral squamous cell carcinoma.

J Biol Chem 2010 Oct 11;285(42):32512-21. Epub 2010 Aug 11.

Department of Bioscience Research, University of Tennessee Health Science Center, Memphis, Tennessee 38163, USA.

Oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) is a major health problem worldwide, and patients have a particularly poor 5-year survival rate. Thus, identification of the molecular targets in OSCC and subsequent innovative therapies are greatly needed. Prolonged exposure to alcohol, tobacco, and pathogenic agents are known risk factors and have suggested that chronic inflammation may represent a potential common denominator in the development of OSCC. Microarray analysis of gene expression in OSCC cell lines with high basal NF-κB activity and OSCC patient samples identified dysregulation of many genes involved in inflammation, wound healing, angiogenesis, and growth regulation. In particular IL-8, CCL5, STAT1, and VEGF gene expression was up-regulated in OSCC. Moreover, IL-8 protein levels were significantly higher in OSCC cell lines as compared with normal human oral keratinocytes. Targeting IL-8 expression by siRNA significantly reduced the survival of OSCC cells, indicating that it plays an important role in OSCC development and/or progression. Inhibiting the inflammatory pathway by aspirin and the proteasome/NF-κB pathway by bortezomib resulted in marked reduction in cell viability in OSCC lines. Taken together our studies indicate a strong link between inflammation and OSCC development and reveal IL-8 as a potential mediator. Treatment based on prevention of general inflammation and/or the NF-κB pathway shows promise in OSCCs.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1074/jbc.M110.150490DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2952253PMC
October 2010

The oral biopsy: indications, techniques and special considerations.

J Tenn Dent Assoc 2010 ;90(2):17-20; quiz 21-2

College of Dentistry, University of Tennessee Health Sciences Center, USA.

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August 2010

Clinical-pathological conference: case 2.

Head Neck Pathol 2010 Sep 30;4(3):221-5. Epub 2010 Jul 30.

OMFP Laboratory and Clinical Oral Pathology/Oral Medicine, Room 412, Department of Pathology and Medicine, University of the Pacific, San Francisco, CA 94115-2333, USA.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s12105-010-0192-4DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2923319PMC
September 2010

AAOMP case challenge: a pigmented lesion of the mandibular facial gingiva.

J Contemp Dent Pract 2007 Sep 1;8(6):96-100. Epub 2007 Sep 1.

Oral and Maxillofacial Pathology graduate program, College of Dentistry, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH, USA.

A 55-year-old white male was referred by his dermatologist for evaluation of an asymptomatic dark brown lesion on the mandibular facial attached gingiva.
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September 2007

AAOMP case challenge: an expansile mass of the right posterior mandible.

J Contemp Dent Pract 2006 Feb 15;7(1):186-90. Epub 2006 Feb 15.

Oral and Maxillofacial Pathology Graduate Program, College of Dentistry, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH, USA.

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February 2006