Publications by authors named "Mojgan Morvaridzadeh"

24 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Effect of omega-3 fatty acids supplementation on adipokines: a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials.

Crit Rev Food Sci Nutr 2021 May 17:1-15. Epub 2021 May 17.

Department of Nutritional Science, School of Nutritional Science and Food Technology, Kermanshah University of Medical Sciences, Kermanshah, Iran.

Background: Although a large body of literature reported the beneficial effects of omega-3 fatty acids (omega-3 FAs) consumption on adipokines levels, but recent findings from clinical trials are not univocal. The aim of this systematic review and meta-analysis was to evaluate the effect of omega-3 FAs supplements on adipokines.

Methods: We searched Medline, Web of Science, Scopus, Embase, and Cochrane Library from inception to August 2020 without any particular language limitations. Outcomes were summarized as standardized mean difference (SMD) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) estimated from Hedge's g and random effects modeling.

Results: Fifty-two trials involving 4,568 participants were included. Omega-3 FAs intake was associated with a significant increase in plasma adiponectin levels ( = 43; 3,434 participants; SMD: 0.21, 95% CI: 0.04, 0.37;  = 0.01; = 80.14%). This meta-analysis indicates that supplementing participants with omega-3 fatty acids more than 2000 mg daily and more than 10 weeks resulted in a significant and more favorable improvement in plasma adiponectin levels. However, omega-3 FAs intake had no significant effect on leptin levels (SMD: -0.02, 95% CI: -0.20, 0.17, = 54.13%).

Conclusion: The evidence supports a beneficial effect of omega-3 FAs intake on serum adiponectin levels but does not appear to impact on leptin concentrations. Larger well-designed RCTs are still required to evaluate the effect of omega-3 FAs on leptin in specific diseases.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/10408398.2021.1915743DOI Listing
May 2021

Effect of extra virgin olive oil consumption on glycemic control: A systematic review and meta-analysis.

Nutr Metab Cardiovasc Dis 2021 Jun 24;31(7):1953-1961. Epub 2021 Feb 24.

Department of Nutrition, School of Public Health, Iran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran; Department of Nutritional Science, School of Nutritional Science and Food Technology, Kermanshah University of Medical Sciences, Kermanshah, Iran. Electronic address:

Aims: Several health benefits are contributed to extra virgin olive oil (EVOO). The polyphenol fraction of EVOO may be responsible for its cardioprotective impacts. This systematic review and meta-analysis aimed to investigate the effect of EVOO intake on glycemic parameters. Electronic literature searched through 1 September 2020 across MEDLINE/PubMed, Web of Science, and SCOPUS databases to find all clinical trials that reported the effect of EVOO intake on glycemic parameters [FBS(fasting blood glucose), insulin, HOMA-IR (Homeostatic Model Assessment for Insulin Resistance) and HbA1c (glycated hemoglobin A1c)] vs. control.

Data Synthesis: We pooled standardized mean differences (SMD) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) from randomized clinical trials (RCTs) using random-effects models. Heterogeneity was assessed by Cochran Q-statistic and quantified (I). We found 13 related trials comprising a total of 633 subjects. In pooled analysis, EVOO intake had no effect on FBS (SMD: -0.07; 95% CI: -0.20, 0.07; I = 0.0%), insulin (SMD: -0.32; 95% CI: -0.70, 0.06; I = 38.0%), and HOMA-IR (SMD: -0.32; 95% CI: -0.75, 0.10; I = 51.0%). However, a decreasing trend was observed in these effects. Subgroup analysis based on age, health status, dose, and EVOO intake duration also did not significantly change results.

Conclusion: Although EVOO seems a promising hypoglycemic effects, we did not find any significant evidence that EVOO consumption impacts glucose homeostasis. Furthermore, well-designed RCTs with longer durations are still needed to evaluate the EVOO's efficacy on glycemic parameters.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.numecd.2021.02.017DOI Listing
June 2021

Effect of omega-3 fatty acids supplementation on cardio-metabolic and oxidative stress parameters in patients with chronic kidney disease: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

BMC Nephrol 2021 May 1;22(1):160. Epub 2021 May 1.

Department of Nutritional Science, School of Nutritional Science and Food Technology, Kermanshah University of Medical Sciences, Farabi Hospital, Faculty of Nutrition Sciences and Food Technology, Postal Code: 6715847141, Isar Square, Kermanshah, Iran.

Background: Omega-3 fatty acids (FAs) have been suggested as a beneficial supplement in chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients, but the results of randomized clinical trials (RCTs) are controversial. We conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis to evaluate all the RCTs about the impact of omega-3 FAs supplementation on cardiometabolic outcomes and oxidative stress parameters in patients with CKD.

Methods: We performed a systematic database search in PubMed/MEDLINE, EMBASE, Scopus, Web of Science, and Cochrane Central, up to May 2020. We included all placebo-controlled randomized trials that assessed the effect of omega-3 FAs supplementation on any cardiometabolic outcomes: blood pressure, total cholesterol (TC), low-density lipoprotein (LDL) and high-density lipoprotein (HDL) or triglycerides (TG) and oxidative stress parameters. Data were pooled using DerSimonian-Laird's random-effects model.

Results: Finally, thirteen articles met the inclusion criteria for this review omega-3 FAs supplementation significantly decrease TC (SMD: -0.26; 95% CI: - 0.51, - 0.02; I = 52.7%), TG (SMD: -0.22; 95% CI: - 0.43, - 0.02; I = 36.0%) and Malondialdehyde (MDA) levels (SMD: -0.91; 95% CI: - 1.29, - 0.54; I = 00.0%) and also significantly increase superoxide dismutase (SOD) (SMD: 0.58; 95% CI: 0.27, 0.90; I = 00.0%) and Glutathione peroxidase (GPx) (SMD: 0.50; 95% CI: 0.14, 0.86; I = 00.0%) activities. However our results show that omega-3 FAs supplementation have no significant effects on HDL, LDL and blood pressure. Conclusion This systematic review and meta-analysis supports current evidence for the clinical benefit of omega-3 FAs intake to improve cardiometabolic parameters in CKD patients. However, well-designed RCTs still needed to provide a conclusive picture in this field.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12882-021-02351-9DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8088683PMC
May 2021

Probiotic Yogurt Fortified with Vitamin D Can Improve Glycemic Status in Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease Patients: a Randomized Clinical Trial.

Clin Nutr Res 2021 Jan 22;10(1):36-47. Epub 2021 Jan 22.

Department of Nutrition, Research Center for Environmental Determinants of Health (RCEDH), Kermanshah University of Medical Sciences, Kermanshah 6719851351, Iran.

Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is a significant public health problem globally and the most notable chronic liver disease in Asian countries. Various dietary supplements have been assessed as potential methods to alleviate the metabolic damages related to NAFLD, but the results of these works have been equivocal. This study aimed to evaluate the effects of probiotic yogurt fortified with vitamin D (Pro-YFD) on glycemic and anthropometric indices in patients with NAFLD. One hundred and four NAFLD patients of both sexes were randomly allocated to 2 groups: group A (Pro-YFD) and group B (unfortified yogurt). The intervention period was 3 months. Fasting blood samples were obtained for measuring fasting blood sugar (FBS) and insulin level. Food intake was measured using a validated food frequency questionnaire. Body composition was estimated by bio-impedance. Eighty-eight patients completed the study. The mean serum level of 25(OH)D was elevated significantly (p < 0.001), while insulin level decreased significantly (p < 0.003) in group A at the end of the study. FBS levels showed no significant differences between the groups at the end of the trial. Also, there were no significant changes in diet caloric intake, physical activity, or anthropometric indices in the 2 groups during the interventions. Pro-YFD in the diets of patients with NAFLD may attenuate insulin resistance and improve serum level of 25(OH)D.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.7762/cnr.2021.10.1.36DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7850818PMC
January 2021

Effect of Probiotic, Prebiotic, and Synbiotic Supplementation on Cardiometabolic and Oxidative Stress Parameters in Patients With Chronic Kidney Disease: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis.

Clin Ther 2021 Mar 30;43(3):e71-e96. Epub 2021 Jan 30.

Department of Nutritional Science, School of Nutritional Science and Food Technology, Kermanshah University of Medical Sciences, Kermanshah, Iran. Electronic address:

Purpose: Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is a major health problem worldwide. Evidence supporting the use of probiotic, prebiotic, and synbiotic supplementation in the management of CKD is mixed, although some studies suggest they may be useful. A systematic review and meta-analysis was performed to evaluate the effectiveness of probiotic, prebiotic, and synbiotic supplementation for improving cardiometabolic and oxidative stress parameters in patients with CKD.

Methods: A comprehensive key word search was performed in EMBASE, Medline, Scopus, Cochrane Central, and Web of Science until April 2020. Randomized controlled trials investigating the effectiveness of probiotic, synbiotic, and prebiotic supplementation for the management of adults with CKD were included. Primary outcomes were measures of cardiometabolic parameters such as cholesterol and fasting blood glucose. Secondary outcomes were measures of oxidative stress (eg, malondialdehyde levels) and body mass index. Random effects meta-analyses were used to estimate mean treatment effects. Results are reported as standardized mean differences (SMDs) and 95% CIs.

Findings: Fourteen articles were included. In patients with CKD, probiotic, prebiotic, and synbiotic supplementation significantly reduced total cholesterol (SMD, -0.25; 95% CI, -0.46 to -0.04; I = 00.0%), fasting blood glucose (SMD, -0.41; 95% CI, -0.65 to -0.17; I = 00.0%), homeostatic model assessment of insulin resistance (SMD, -0.63; 95% CI, -0.95 to -0.30; I = 43.3%), insulin levels (SMD, -0.49; 95% CI, -0.90 to -0.08; I = 65.2%), high-sensitivity C-reactive protein levels (SMD, -0.52; 95% CI, -0.81 to -0.22; I = 52.7%), and malondialdehyde levels (SMD, -0.79; 95% CI, -1.22 to -0.37; I = 69.8%) compared with control interventions. Supplementation significantly increased the quantitative insulin sensitivity check index (SMD, 0.78; 95% CI, 0.51 to 1.05; I = 00.0%), total antioxidant capacity (SMD, 0.42; 95% CI, 0.18 to 0.66; I = 00.0%), and glutathione levels (SMD, 0.52; 95% CI, 0.19 to 0.86; I = 37.0%).

Implications: Probiotic, prebiotic, and synbiotic supplementation seems to be a promising intervention for improving cardiometabolic and oxidative stress parameters in patients with CKD.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.clinthera.2020.12.021DOI Listing
March 2021

Resveratrol supplementation and acute pancreatitis: A comprehensive review.

Biomed Pharmacother 2021 May 22;137:111268. Epub 2021 Jan 22.

Department of Nutritional Science, School of Nutritional Science and Food Technology, Kermanshah University of Medical Sciences, Kermanshah, Iran. Electronic address:

Resveratrol, a natural polyphenolic ingredient extracted from herbs, suppresses oxidative stress and inflammation. We performed a comprehensive review to find any evidence about the effects of Resveratrol on acute pancreatitis (AP). Resveratrol has been found to directly impact cytokine generation. As these factors play a crucial role in the pathophysiology of AP, resveratrol might attenuate AP and its complications. Mechanistically, resveratrol exerts its pharmacological effects through anti-inflammatory and antioxidant mechanisms via interaction with different signaling molecules and transcription factors. Indeed, resveratrol might prove to be an effective therapeutic component for AP treatment in the future. In this review, we shed light on potential most recent pathways through which resveratrol might impact the management and control of AP.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.biopha.2021.111268DOI Listing
May 2021

Effect of ginger (Zingiber officinale) supplementation on oxidative stress parameters: A systematic review and meta-analysis.

J Food Biochem 2021 02 17;45(2):e13612. Epub 2021 Jan 17.

Department of Nutritional Science, School of Nutritional Science and Food Technology, Kermanshah University of Medical Sciences, Kermanshah, Iran.

A wide variety of antioxidant properties are attributed to ginger (Zingiber officinale) and several randomized controlled trials (RCTs) have investigated the effect of ginger intake on major oxidative stress (OS) parameters. We conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis to evaluate the effects of using ginger to improve OS levels. Medline, Scopus, ISI Web of Science, EMBASE, and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials were systematically searched up until March 2020 to gather RCTs that evaluated the impact of ginger intake on the levels and activity of OS parameters in adult subjects. Means and standard deviations for relevant OS variables were extracted and evaluated to assess the quality of the trials based on the Cochrane risk-of-bias tool for randomized trials. The gathered data were pooled and expressed as standardized mean difference (SMD) with 95% Confidence Intervals (95% CI). Twelve trials were included in this review. Ginger intake was shown to significantly increase glutathione peroxidase (GPx) activity (SMD: 1.64; 95% CI: 0.43, 2.85; I  = 86.8%) and total antioxidant capacity (TAC) (SMD: 0.40; 95% CI: 0.06, 0.73; I  = 42.8%) and significantly decrease malondialdehyde (MDA) levels (SMD: -0.69; 95% CI: -1.26, -0.12; I  = 85.8%) compared to control groups. Ginger supplementation also non-significantly associated with an increase in CAT activity (SMD: 1.09; 95% CI: -0.07, 2.25; I  = 87.6%). This systematic review and meta-analysis presents convincing evidence supporting the efficacy of ginger supplementation on improving OS levels. PRACTICAL IMPLICATIONS: In health sciences, OS, due to its pivotal role in the pathophysiology of several chronic diseases, is a subject with a long history. Recent research strives for a safe, ideal, and effective antioxidant. Ginger is herbal medicine, which has been widely used in traditional and complementary medicine. Proving the antioxidant effect and potential benefit of ginger has positive clinical implications for the application of this practical herb.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/jfbc.13612DOI Listing
February 2021

Effect of DASH diet on oxidative stress parameters: A systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized clinical trials.

Diabetes Metab Syndr 2020 Nov-Dec;14(6):2131-2138. Epub 2020 Nov 6.

Department of Clinical Nutrition and Dietetics, Faculty of Nutrition and Food Technology, National Nutrition and Food Technology, Research Institute Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran. Electronic address:

Background And Aims: Oxidative stress (OS) is one of the main risk factors for several chronic diseases. The Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension (DASH) contain many antioxidants and may contribute to managing OS.

Objective: To perform a systematic review and meta-analysis to examine the impacts of the DASH diet on OS parameters.

Methods: A comprehensive electronic search in MEDLINE, Scopus, EMBASE, and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials was performed through September 2020 to find related studies evaluating the impact of the DASH diet on OS parameters. Standardized mean differences were pooled using random-effects meta-analysis.

Results: Eight studies with a total of 317 subjects met our inclusion criteria. Four studies included in meta-analysis model with 200 participants (100 in treatment and 100 in control group). The DASH diet was associated with a statistically significant decrease in malondialdehyde (MDA) (SMD: -0.53; 95% CI: -0.89, -0.16; I = 42.1%), and a significant increase in glutathione (GSH) (SMD: 0.83; 95% CI: 0.36, 1.03; I = 42.1%). Meta-analysis found no statistically significant effect of DASH diet on nitric oxide (NO) (SMD: -1.40; 95% CI: -0.12, 1.93; I = 92.6%) or total antioxidant capacity (TAC) levels (SMD: 0.95; 95% CI: -0.10, 1.99; I = 87.6%).

Conclusion: Our results demonstrated that a DASH diet could significantly increase GSH and decrease MDA levels. Furthermore, there is a trend to improve TAC, NO, and f2-isoprostanes by the adherence to the DASH diet. However, long-term, large sample size and well-designed randomized clinical trials are still needed to draw concrete conclusions about DASH diet's effects on OS parameters.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.dsx.2020.10.031DOI Listing
November 2020

Effect of soy products and isoflavones on oxidative stress parameters: A systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials.

Food Res Int 2020 11 21;137:109578. Epub 2020 Jul 21.

Department of Nutritional Science, School of Nutritional Science and Food Technology, Kermanshah University of Medical Sciences, Kermanshah, Iran. Electronic address:

Soy products and isoflavones intake have been shown to exert antioxidant effects. There are several randomized control trials (RCTs) that evaluated the effect of soy products intake on oxidative stress (OS) parameters. The aim of the present systematic review and meta-analysis was to summarize the results of RCTs evaluating the effect of soy products and isoflavones intake on OS parameters. Randomized trials that assessed the effect of soy products and isoflavones intake on OS parameters in adults were identified through searching in electronic databases: Cochrane clinical trial center, Embase, PubMed, Scopus, and Web of Sciences up to April 2020. Random effects model was used to calculate the effects sizes of soy intake on OS parameters. Twenty-four trials with 1,852 participants were eligible and were included in the meta-analysis which measured OS parameters. Soy intake compared to control group significantly reduced MDA levels (SMD: -0.53; 95% CI: -0.86, -0.19; I = 88.3%), increased GSH levels (SMD: 0.51; 95% CI: 0.13, 0.88; I = 72.4%), SOD activity (SMD: 0.53; 95% CI: 0.08, 0.99; I = 84.1%), TAC (SMD: 0.54; 95% CI: 0.27, 0.82; I = 49.3%) and TRAP (SMD: 1.74; 95% CI: 0.82, 2.65; I = 81.3%) significantly compared to control group. Soy products and isoflavones intake are effective in improving OS parameters in adults compared with controls; thus, it could be a valuable advise to control OS progress in chronic diseases.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.foodres.2020.109578DOI Listing
November 2020

Cross-talk between oxidative stress signaling and microRNA regulatory systems in carcinogenesis: Focused on gastrointestinal cancers.

Biomed Pharmacother 2020 Nov 23;131:110729. Epub 2020 Sep 23.

Colorectal Research Center, Iran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran. Electronic address:

Molecular mechanisms underlying development and progression of gastrointestinal (GI) cancers are mediated by both oxidative stress (OS) and microRNAs (miRNAs) involvement. Notably, OS signaling may regulate the expression of miRNAs, and miRNAs function as imperative players in OS-initiated tumors. Given the defined biological roles of both OS systems and miRNAs in GI carcinogenesis, a possible interplay between these two key cellular networks is considered. A growing body of evidence has indicated a reciprocal connection between OS signaling pathways and miRNA regulatory machines in GI cancer development and progression. Illumination of the molecular cross-talking between miRNAs and the OS would improve our pathophysiological insight into carcinogens. Also, understanding the molecular mechanisms in which these systems are reciprocally regulated may imply in future medical practice mainly GI cancer therapy. Nowadays, therapeutic strategies focusing on miRNA and OS in GI cancer treatment are increasingly delineated. Since the use of antioxidants is limited owing to the contrasting consequences of OS signaling in cancer, the discovery of OS-responsive miRNAs may provide a potential new strategy to overcome OS-mediated GI carcinogenesis. Given the possible interaction between OS and miRNAs in GI cancers, this review aimed to elucidate the existing evidence on the interaction between OS and miRNA regulatory machinery and its role in GI carcinogenesis. In this regard, we will illustrate the function of miRNAs which target OS systems during homeostasis and tumorigenesis. We also discuss the biological cross-talk between OS systems and miRNAs and corresponding cell signaling pathways.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.biopha.2020.110729DOI Listing
November 2020

Effects of curcumin supplementation on blood glucose, insulin resistance and androgens in patients with polycystic ovary syndrome: A randomized double-blind placebo-controlled clinical trial.

Phytomedicine 2021 Jan 22;80:153395. Epub 2020 Oct 22.

Department of Nutrition, School of Public Health, Iran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran. Electronic address:

Background: Curcumin is a biologically active phytochemical ingredient found in turmeric. It has several pharmacologic effects that might benefit patients with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS).

Objective: We hypothesized curcumin to be effective in improving blood sugar levels, insulin resistance and hyperandrogenism in individuals with PCOS.

Methods: In a randomized double-blind placebo-controlled trial, individuals with PCOS were treated with curcumin (500 mg three times daily) or placebo for 12 weeks. Primary outcome measures were fasting plasma glucose (FPG), fasting insulin (FI), sex hormone levels, and hirsutism (Ferriman-Gallwey [mFG] score). Secondary outcomes included anthropometric measurements.

Results: Of 72 randomized individuals, 67 completed the trial. The two groups were comparable at baseline. At the end of the study, FPG and Dehydroepiandrosterone levels had decreased significantly in the intervention group compared to control (difference of change (post-pre) between intervention and placebo groups: -4.11 mg/dL; 95% CI: -8.35, -0.35 mg/dL; p = 0.033 and -26.53 microg/dL; 95% CI: -47.99, -4.34 µg/dL; p = 0.035, respectively). We also observed a statistically non-significant increase (p = 0.082) in Estradiol levels in the intervention group compared to control. No serious adverse events were reported throughout the trial.

Conclusions: Curcumin might be a safe and useful supplement to ameliorate PCOS-associated hyperandrogenemia and hyperglycemia. However, longer trials investigating different dosages in longer durations are needed to underpin these findings.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.phymed.2020.153395DOI Listing
January 2021

The effect of cinnamon supplementation on glycemic control in women with polycystic ovary syndrome: A systematic review and meta-analysis.

J Food Biochem 2021 01 27;45(1):e13543. Epub 2020 Oct 27.

Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Imam Khomeini Hospital, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran.

Several clinical trials have identified glycemic-lowering effects of cinnamon, while other studies have reported conflicting findings. A comprehensive systematic search on Embase, PubMed, Scopus, Web of Science, and Cochrane Library was conducted using defined keywords in any language through June 2020. Studies that compared the effect of cinnamon with placebo on insulin resistance (IR) indices, as the primary outcome, in women with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) were considered eligible. Standard Mean difference (SMD) (with 95% confidence intervals) for endpoints were calculated using the random-effects model. Finally, five RCTs which met the criteria were included in the meta-analysis. After pooling data, cinnamon supplementation significantly reduced homeostatic model assessment for insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) scores in women with PCOS (SMD: -0.84, 95% CI: -1.52, -0.16, p = .010). Cinnamon supplementation likely improves certain IR markers in patients with PCOS. PRACTICAL APPLICATIONS: There are controversies reports for cinnamon intake, which animal models have suggested that it decreases IR via promotion of insulin action, stimulating insulin signaling pathways, and enhancing insulin sensitivity. This study provides comprehensive information about the effect of cinnamon on insulin resistance (IR) indices in women with PCOS. In this regard, our results indicated that cinnamon supplementation significantly reduced homeostatic model assessment for insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) scores in women with PCOS. Therefore, consumption of cinnamon can be safe and this can be a useful recommendation for improving IR and promotion of healthy life which indeed are the potential or actual uses of this research.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/jfbc.13543DOI Listing
January 2021

Effect of melatonin supplementation on oxidative stress parameters: A systematic review and meta-analysis.

Pharmacol Res 2020 11 29;161:105210. Epub 2020 Sep 29.

Department of Nutritional Science, School of Nutritional Science and Food Technology, Kermanshah University of Medical Sciences, Kermanshah, Iran. Electronic address:

Background: Oxidative stress, defined as an imbalance between pro-oxidants and neutralizing antioxidants within the body, is a growing public health concern. Oxidative stress is involved in the progression of nearly all chronic diseases. Melatonin has been suggested to reduce oxidative stress by its potential radical scavenging properties.

Objective: To determine the efficacy and safety of melatonin as a therapy for the improvement of oxidative stress parameters in randomized controlled trials.

Methods: A systematic database search using Scopus, PubMed/Medline, EMBASE, Web of Science, the Cochrane Controlled Register of Trials and clinicaltrials.gov (https://clinicaltrials.gov) for studies published up to July 2020 was conducted. We included studies which investigated the effect of supplemental melatonin compared to placebo on oxidative stress parameters in unhealthy patients. Quantitative data synthesis was conducted using a random-effects model with standard mean difference (SMD) and 95 % confidence intervals (CI). Cochrane's Q and I values were used to evaluate heterogeneity.

Results: A total of 12 randomized controlled trials (RCTs) were eligible. The meta-analysis indicated an association between melatonin intake and a significant increase in total antioxidant capacity (TAC) (SMD: 0.76; 95 % CI: 0.30, 1.21; I = 80.1 %), glutathione (GSH) levels (SMD: 0.57; 95 % CI: 0.32, 0.83; I = 15.1 %), superoxide dismutase (SOD) (SMD: 1.38; 95 % CI: 0.13, 2.62; I = 86.9 %), glutathione peroxidase (GPx) (SMD: 1.36; 95 % CI: 0.46, 2.30; I = 89.3 %), glutathione reductase (GR) (SMD: 1.21; 95 % CI: 0.65, 1.77; I = 00.0 %) activities, and a significant reduction in malondialdehyde (MDA) levels (SMD: -0.79; 95 % CI: -1.19, -0.39; I = 73.1 %). Melatonin intake was not shown to significantly affect nitric oxide (NO) levels (SMD: -0.24; 95 % CI: -0.61, 0.14; I = 00.0 %) or catalase (CAT) activity (SMD: -1.38; 95 % CI: -1.42, 4.18; I = 96.6 %).

Conclusion: Melatonin intake was shown to have a significant impact on improving Oxidative stress parameters. However, future research through large, well-designed randomized controlled trials are required to determine the effect of melatonin on oxidative stress parameters in different age groups and different disease types.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.phrs.2020.105210DOI Listing
November 2020

The effects of omega-3 fatty acid supplementation on inflammatory factors in HIV-infected patients: A systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized clinical trials.

Cytokine 2020 12 22;136:155298. Epub 2020 Sep 22.

Department of Nutritional Science, School of Nutritional Science and Food Technology, Kermanshah University of Medical Sciences, Kermanshah, Iran. Electronic address:

High concentrations of C-reactive protein (CRP) and inflammatory markers are common in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected patients and are associated with non-HIV related comorbidity and mortality. Data on the benefits of omega-3 fatty acid (omega-3 FA) supplementation for improving inflammation status in HIV-infected patients are controversial. Thus, we conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis on the beneficial effects of omega-3 FAs on controlling inflammation in HIV-infected patients. We conducted a comprehensive search of the major biomedical databases, including PubMed, EMBASE, Scopus, Web of Science and Cochrane library, for all potentially relevant studies published without restriction from the beginning of time to June 2020. Overall, nine RCTs were included comprising a total of 427 participants. A random-effects model was used to calculate 95% confidence intervals (CI) and the effect was measured as standardized mean difference (SMD). Supplementation of omega-3 FAs showed a significant reduction of CRP (SMD: -0.27, 95% CI: -0.48 to -0.07, P = 0.007). There was no significant difference in levels of TNF-α (SMD: 0.03, 95% CI: -0.79 to 0.85, P = 0.94, I = 87%) and IL-6 (SMD: -0.13, 95% CI: -0.59 to 0.32, P = 0.57, I = 73%, Fig. 3). The results indicate that the supplementation of omega-3 FAs in HIV-infected patients significantly decreases serum CRP levels when compared to the control group, however has no significant effect on IL-6 and TNF-α levels.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.cyto.2020.155298DOI Listing
December 2020

Effect of ginger (Zingiber officinale) on inflammatory markers: A systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials.

Cytokine 2020 11 5;135:155224. Epub 2020 Aug 5.

Department of Nutritional Science, School of Nutritional Science and Food Technology, Kermanshah University of Medical Sciences, Kermanshah, Iran. Electronic address:

The aim of this systematic review and meta-analysis was to investigate the efficacy of ginger supplementation on circulating levels of C-reactive protein (CRP), high sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP), tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α), soluble intercellular adhesion molecule (sICAM), and interleukin-6 (IL-6) concentrations in randomized controlled trials (RCTs). The search included PubMed-Medline, EMBASE, Scopus, Web of Science and Cochrane Library databases to identify randomized clinical trials on the effect of ginger supplementation on circulation levels of CRP, hs-CRP, IL-6, sICAM, and TNF-α published up until February 1st, 2020. We did not restrict articles based on language of publication. Standard mean differences and 95% confidence intervals were calculated for net changes in inflammatory mediators using a random-effects model. Sixteen RCTs comprising 1010 participants were found to be eligible for this meta-analysis. There was a significant reduction of circulating CRP (SMD: -5.11, 95% CI: -7.91, -2.30, I = 98.1%), hs-CRP (SMD: -0.88, 95% CI: -1.63, -0.12, I = 90.8%) and TNF-α levels (SMD: -0.85, 95% CI: -1.48, -0.21, I = 89.4%) following ginger supplementation. However, meta-analysis results did not show any significant impact of ginger supplementation on IL-6 (SMD: -0.45, 95% CI: -1.29, 0.38, I = 89.2%), and sICAM levels (SMD: -0.05, 95% CI: -0.36, 0.26, I = 00.0%). This systematic review and meta-analysis of RCTs demonstrates a significant impact of ginger in lowering circulating CRP, hs-CRP and TNF-α levels. Large-scale RCTs are still needed to draw concrete conclusions about the effect of ginger on other inflammatory mediators.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.cyto.2020.155224DOI Listing
November 2020

Effects of Melissa officinalis (Lemon Balm) on cardio-metabolic outcomes: A systematic review and meta-analysis.

Phytother Res 2020 Dec 2;34(12):3113-3123. Epub 2020 Jul 2.

Department of Nutrition, School of Public Health, Iran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran.

Recent evidence indicates a beneficial effect of Melissa officinalis (MO) intake on several chronic diseases. However, the effects of MO intake have not yet been systematically reviewed. Therefore, we conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) to evaluate the effect of MO intake and focused on several cardiometabolic outcomes. MEDLINE, Scopus, EMBASE, Web of Science and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials were searched for MO-RCTs evaluating cardiometabolic outcomes. Random-effects meta-analyses estimated the pooled standardized mean differences (SMD) between intervention and control groups. Risk of bias was assessed with the Cochrane Collaboration's tool for assessing the risk of bias in RCTs. Seven RCTs were finally deemed eligible. MO intake was associated with a reduced total cholesterol (TC) (SMD: -0.26; 95% CI: -0.52, -0.01; I = 13.7%; k = 6) and a reduced systolic blood pressure (SBP) (SMD: -0.56; 95% CI: -0.85, -0.27; I = 00.0%; k = 3). MO intake was not associated with statistically significant changes in triglycerides, low-density lipoprotein, diastolic blood pressure, high sensitivity c-reactive protein levels, fasting blood sugar, HbA1c, insulin or high-density lipoprotein levels. No serious adverse events were reported. The risk of bias was high in a considerable amount of studies. Our study suggests that MO is a safe supplement with beneficial effects on TC and SBP. However, the findings of our study must be seen in the light of major limitations such as a low number of included studies and a serious risk of bias. High-quality RCTs are needed for firm conclusions concerning the effects of MO on cardiometabolic outcomes.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ptr.6744DOI Listing
December 2020

Coenzyme Q10 supplementation and oxidative stress parameters: a systematic review and meta-analysis of clinical trials.

Eur J Clin Pharmacol 2020 Nov 25;76(11):1483-1499. Epub 2020 Jun 25.

Radiation Sciences Department, School of Allied Medical Sciences, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran.

Purpose: Oxidative stress (OS) is associated with several chronic complications and diseases. The use of coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10) as an adjuvant treatment with routine clinical therapy against metabolic diseases has shown to be beneficial. However, the impact of CoQ10 as a preventive agent against OS has not been systematically investigated.

Methods: A systematic literature search was performed using the PubMed, SCOPUS, EMBASE, and Cochrane Library databases to identify randomized clinical trials evaluating the efficacy of CoQ10 supplementation on OS parameters. Standard mean differences and 95% confidence intervals were calculated for net changes in OS parameters using a random-effects model.

Results: Seventeen randomized clinical trials met the eligibility criteria to be included in the meta-analysis. Overall, CoQ10 supplementation was associated with a statistically significant decrease in malondialdehyde (MDA) (SMD - 0.94; 95% CI - 1.46, - 0.41; I = 87.7%) and a significant increase in total antioxidant capacity (TAC) (SMD 0.67; 95% CI 0.28, 1.07; I = 74.9%) and superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity (SMD 0.40; 95% CI 1.12, 0.67; I = 9.6%). The meta-analysis found no statistically significant impact of CoQ10 supplementation on nitric oxide (NO) (SMD - 1.40; 95% CI - 0.12, 1.93; I = 92.6%), glutathione (GSH) levels (SMD 0.41; 95% CI - 0.09, 0.91; I = 70.0%), catalase (CAT) activity (SMD 0.36; 95% CI - 0.46, 1.18; I = 90.0%), or glutathione peroxidase (GPx) activities (SMD - 1.40; 95% CI: - 0.12, 1.93; I = 92.6%).

Conclusion: CoQ10 supplementation, in the tested range of doses, was shown to reduce MDA concentrations, and increase TAC and antioxidant defense system enzymes. However, there were no significant effects of CoQ10 on NO, GSH concentrations, or CAT activity.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00228-020-02919-8DOI Listing
November 2020

Effect of Cashew Nut on Lipid Profile: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.

Complement Med Res 2020 11;27(5):348-356. Epub 2020 Mar 11.

Department of Nutritional Science, School of Nutritional Science and Food Technology, Kermanshah University of Medical Sciences, Kermanshah, Iran,

Introduction: Nuts are one of the dietary components which appear to have beneficial effects on cardiovascular disease biomarkers. Studies demonstrate beneficial effects of cash-ews on serum lipids concentration, but results in the literature remain inconclusive. We conducted a review to examine the effects of cashew nut supplementation on serum lipid profile.

Methods: Two reviewers independently searched PubMed, Web of Science, Cochrane Library, Scopus, and EMBASE electronic databases from inception until June 2019 without language limitation. Random- and fixed-effects models were used to calculate 95% confidence intervals (CI) for studies.

Results: Six randomized clinical trials comprising 531 participants were included in this systematic review. Three studies were included in the meta-analysis model. There were no significant changes for total cholesterol (TC) (standardized mean difference [SMD]: -0.02, 95% CI: -0.32, 0.28), triglycerides (TG) (SMD: -0.01, 95% CI: -0.22, 0.20), high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol (SMD: 0.09, 95% CI: -0.16, 0.34), or low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol (SMD: -0.18, 95% CI: -0.75, 0.39).

Conclusion: The results of this analysis demonstrate that treatment with cashew nut supplementation alone did not significantly change serum levels of LDL, HDL, TC, or TG.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1159/000506348DOI Listing
May 2021

Effect of Calcium and Vitamin D Co-supplementation on Blood Pressure: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.

Clin Ther 2020 03 14;42(3):e45-e63. Epub 2020 Feb 14.

Department of Nutritional Science, School of Nutritional Science and Food Technology, Kermanshah University of Medical Sciences, Kermanshah, Iran. Electronic address:

Purpose: Vitamin D and calcium insufficiency has been related to elevated blood pressure (BP) and cardiovascular complications. This systematic review and meta-analysis investigates the effect of calcium and vitamin D co-supplementation on BP.

Methods: A systematic search was conducted of electronic databases, including Web of Sciences, MEDLINE, Scopus, EMBASE, and the Cochrane Library, along with searches of gray literature and reference lists from included trials. There were no language restrictions, and the databases were searched from inception to October 2019. Randomized controlled trials, using calcium and vitamin D co-supplementation and reporting mean systolic BP and/or diastolic BP (DBP) with SDs, were included in the systematic review. Articles were evaluated independently by 2 researchers based on inclusion and exclusion criteria. A random effects model was conducted to synthesize the data.

Findings: Eight trials were included in the meta-analysis. Meta-analysis of these 8 trials indicated a nonsignificant reduction in systolic BP in the calcium and vitamin D co-supplementation group compared with control (standardized mean difference, -0.23; 95% CI, -0.52 to 0.06). Conversely, there was a statistically significant decrease in DBP (standardized mean difference, -0.29; 95% CI, -0.55 to -0.02). Subgroup analysis suggested that young adults achieve a greater reduction in DBP than other age groups.

Implications: Calcium and vitamin D co-supplementation can modulate DBP and should be investigated more specifically in large, well-designed trials of hypertensive populations. (Clin Ther. 2020;42:XXX-XXX) © 2020 Elsevier HS Journals, Inc.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.clinthera.2020.01.005DOI Listing
March 2020

The effects of curcumin supplementation on oxidative stress, Sirtuin-1 and peroxisome proliferator activated receptor γ coactivator 1α gene expression in polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS) patients: A randomized placebo-controlled clinical trial.

Diabetes Metab Syndr 2020 Mar - Apr;14(2):77-82. Epub 2020 Jan 8.

Department of Nutrition, School of Public Health, Iran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran. Electronic address:

Background & Aims: Curcumin is a biologically active phytochemical ingredient found in turmeric and has antioxidant pharmacologic actions that may benefit patients with polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS). The aim in this trial was to evaluate the efficacy of curcumin supplementation on oxidative stress enzymes, sirtuin-1 (SIRT1) and Peroxisome proliferator activated receptor γ coactivator 1α (PGC1α) gene expression in PCOS patients.

Methods: Seventy-two patients with PCOS were recruited for this randomized, double-blinded, clinical trial. Thirty-six patients received curcumin, 1500 mg (three times per day), and 36 patients received placebo for 3 months. Gene expression of SIRT1, PGC1α and serum activity of glutathione peroxidase (Gpx) and superoxide dismutase (SOD) enzymes were evaluated at the beginning of trial and at 3-month follow-up.

Results: Sixty-seven patients with PCOS completed the trial. Curcumin supplementation significantly increased gene expression of PGC1α (p = 0.011) and activity of the Gpx enzyme (p = 0.045). Curcumin also non-significantly increased gene expression of SIRT1 and activity of the SOD enzyme.

Conclusions: Curcumin seems to be an efficient reducer of oxidative stress related complications in patients with PCOS. Further studies on curcumin should strengthen our findings.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.dsx.2020.01.002DOI Listing
December 2020

The effect of pomegranate on oxidative stress parameters: A systematic review and meta-analysis.

Complement Ther Med 2020 Jan 22;48:102252. Epub 2019 Nov 22.

Department of Nutritional Science, School of Nutritional Science and Food Technology, Kermanshah University of Medical Sciences, Kermanshah, Iran. Electronic address:

Objective: Pomegranate contains remarkable amounts of phenolic ingredients and it has been related to the antioxidant capacity of this fruit. Several primary studies show that pomegranate intake can improve antioxidant status. The objective of this systematic review and meta-analysis consisted in investigating the effect of pomegranate on oxidative stress (OS) parameters.

Methods: A comprehensive electronic database search in Scopus, Web of science, Embase, Cochrane library and Medline was performed to identify eligible randomized controlled trials (RCTs). A meta-analysis of included studies was performed on selected variables using a random-effects model. Quality assessment was conducted by means of Cochrane risk of bias assessment tool.

Results: Systematic search yielded 575 references. A total of 11 RCTs reporting data from 484 participants included. Meta-analysis of data from 11 included RCTs did not support convincing evidence as to a significant increasing effect of pomegranate intake in TAC (SMD: 0.43 ; 95 %CI: -0.19, 1.06), Gpx (SMD: 0.18, 95 % CI: -0.25, 0.62, p = 0.4) and paraxonase (SMD: 0.36, 95 % CI: -0.50, 1.22, p= 0.41) as well as not significant decrease in Malondialdehyde (MDA) (SMD: -0.81, 95 % CI: -1.79, 0.09, P = 0.08).

Conclusion: Future well-designed clinical trials are needed before definite conclusive claims can be made about the effect of pomegranate on OS parameters.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ctim.2019.102252DOI Listing
January 2020

Omega-3 fatty acids supplementation and oxidative stress parameters: A systematic review and meta-analysis of clinical trials.

Pharmacol Res 2019 11 26;149:104462. Epub 2019 Sep 26.

Department of Biostatistics and Epidemiology, Babol University of Medical Sciences, Babol, Iran. Electronic address:

Omega-3 fatty acids (omega-3 FAs) supplementation effects on oxidants and antioxidants are always controversial. Oxidative stress (OS) is one of the major mechanisms that contribute to the pathogenesis of several chronic diseases. The present systematic review and meta-analysis aimed to summarize the finding of randomized clinical trials (RCTs) examining the effects of omega-3 FAs on OS markers. Five databases including PubMed, Embase, Scopus, Web of science, and Cochrane were searched up to May 5th, 2019 with no language restriction. RCTs included if they compared OS indices among subjects who received omega-3 FAs supplements and subjects who supplemented with placebo. To estimate the effects of omega-3 FAs supplementation, standardized mean difference (SMD) with 95% confidence intervals (95% CI) were pooled using random effects model. Of 5,887 publications, 39 trials involving 2,875 participants were included for the meta-analysis. The pooled analysis of data indicated that omega-3 FAs significantly increased serum total antioxidant capacity (TAC) (SMD: 0.48, 95% CI: 0.23, 0.72, P< 0.001; I= 60%), glutathione peroxidase (GPx) (SMD: 0.73, 95% CI: 0.30, 1.16, P= 0.001; I= 83%) activity and decreased malondialdehyde (MDA) (SMD= -0.42, 95% CI: -0.62, -0.21; P < 0.001; I= 74%) compared to the placebo group. However, the effects of omega-3 FAs on nitric oxide (NO) (SMD: -0.17 , 95% CI: -0.77, 0.43, P = 0.57; I= 91%), reduced glutathione (GSH) (SMD= 0.23, 95% CI= -0.17, 0.64, P= 0.25; I= 75%), superoxide dismutase (SOD) (0.12 , 95% CI: -0.40, 0.65, P= 0.64; I= 89%) and catalase (CAT) (0.16, 95% CI: -0.33, 0.65, P= 0.52; I= 75%,) activities was not significant. Supplementation with omega-3 FAs significantly improves MDA, TAC levels, and GPx activity. Thus, omega-3 FAs can be mentioned as enhancer factors in antioxidant defense against reactive oxygen species (ROS).
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.phrs.2019.104462DOI Listing
November 2019

Effect of omega-3 fatty acid plus vitamin E Co-Supplementation on lipid profile: A systematic review and meta-analysis.

Diabetes Metab Syndr 2019 Mar - Apr;13(2):1649-1656. Epub 2019 Mar 16.

Department of Nutritional Science, School of Nutritional Science and Food Technology, Kermanshah University of Medical Sciences, Kermanshah, Iran. Electronic address:

Background: Dyslipidemia is linked to chronic inflammation, which in return leads to a set of chronic disorders. Omega-3 fatty acids have been reported to reduce inflammation. Furthermore, Vitamin E is a fat-soluble vitamin which has antioxidant and anti-inflammatory effects. Vitamin E and omega-3 fatty acids co-supplementations may be more effective than the single supplementation in control dyslipidemia. Therefore, we designed and conducted the current systematic review and meta-analysis to investigate the effect of co-supplementation of vitamin E and omega-3 fatty acids on the lipid profile.

Methods: A comprehensive search for studies published between January 1990 and July 2018 was performed. The initial search extracted 3015 potentially relevant articles. After studying these publications, 9 RCTs were potentially eligible and retrieved in full text.

Results: The meta-analysis indicate that on total cholesterol, HDL, LDL and triglyceride individually did not show any significant difference between intervention and control groups, but vitamin E an omega-3 fatty acids co-supplementations significantly reduce VLDL levels.

Conclusions: Based on the available evidence, omega-3 fatty acid and vitamin E co-supplementation can reduce VLDL, although its effect on other lipid profile parameters requires more well-designed studies.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.dsx.2019.03.018DOI Listing
December 2019

Effect of omega-3 fatty acid plus vitamin E Co-Supplementation on oxidative stress parameters: A systematic review and meta-analysis.

Clin Nutr 2020 04 10;39(4):1019-1025. Epub 2019 May 10.

Department of Nutritional Science, School of Nutritional Science and Food Technology, Kermanshah University of Medical Sciences, Kermanshah, Iran. Electronic address:

Background & Aims: The impact of combined omega-3 FAs and vitamin E supplementation on oxidative stress (OS) has been evaluated in several studies. However the results are inconsistent. Therefore, we performed a systematic review and meta-analysis to assess the role of omega-3 FAplus vitamin E on anti-oxidant and OS parameters.

Methods: We searched five databases (PubMed, Embase, Web of Sciences, Scopus and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials) from inception until March 15th 2018 for RCT covering OS parameters combined with omega-3 FAs and vitamin E. The effect of omega-3 FAs plus vitamin E combination on OS factors was determined as the standardized mean difference (SMD) calculated according to DerSimonian and Laird for the random effects model.

Results: Nine articles were included in our analyses, significant improvements were observed in trials supplementing with omega-3 FAs plus vitamin E vs placebo for total antioxidant capacity (TAC) (SMD=0.63, 95%CI: 0.31 to 0.95, P<0.001) and nitric oxide (NO) (SMD=0.55, 95%CI: 0.23 to 0.87, P<0.001). Significant reduction was observed for malondialdehyde (MDA) (SMD: -0.48, 95%CI: -0.68 to -0.28, P<0.001). However, the results of meta-analysis did not show a significant difference in levels of glutathione (GSH) (SMD=0.34, 95%CI: -0.07 to 0.75, P=0.10), superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity (SMD: 0.07, 95% CI: -0.58 to 0.73, P=0.82) and Catalase (CAT) activity (SMD: 0.74, 95% CI: -0.30 to 1.79, P=0.16).

Conclusion: Co-supplementation with omega-3 FAs and vitamin E increases the levels of NO and TAC, while MDA levels decrease compared to placebo. However, the results showed no significant alterations on GSH concentrations, CAT, and SOD activities.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.clnu.2019.05.004DOI Listing
April 2020