Publications by authors named "Mohsen Farhadpour"

9 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Neuroprotective effect of Lithospermum officinale callus extract on inflamed primary microglial cells.

Curr Pharm Biotechnol 2020 Nov 4. Epub 2020 Nov 4.

Department of Plant Bioproducts, National Institute for Genetic Engineering and Biotechnology, P.O.Box:14965/161, Tehran. Iran.

Background And Objective: Lithospermum officinale is a famous medicinal herb in the traditional medicine of India. However, the medicinal use of its root extract is limited due to the presence of pyrrolizidine alkaloids (PzAl). It was recently shown that PzAl are not accumulated in the cell culture of L. officinale while the biosynthetic pathway of phenolic acids remains active so that rosmarinic acid (RsA) is the main product in the proliferated callus. Considering the existing literature on the anti-inflammatory effects of caffeic acid (CfA) and its derivatives, this research was devoted to the evaluation of the anti-inflammatory capacity of methanolic extracts of L. officinale callus (LoE) on the rat microglial cells as the immune cells of the Central Nervous System, which play an essential role in the responses to neuroinflammation.

Methods: primary microglia were obtained from Wistar rat, then they were subjected to various amounts of CfA and methanolic extracts of 17 and 31-day L. officinale callus prior to stimulation by LPS. In addition to HPLC analysis of the extracts, viability, nitric oxide production, evaluation of the pro-inflammatory genes and cytokines in the inflamed microglia were investigated.

Results: Methanolic extract of the 17-day old callus of L. officinale exhibited anti-inflammatory effects on the LPS- stimulated microglial cells much higher than that was observed for CfA. The data was further supported by the decreased expression of NOS2, TNF-α, and Cox-2 mRNA and the suppression of TNF-α and IL-1β release in the activated microglial cells pretreated with the effective dose of LoE (0.8 mg mL-1).

Conclusion: It was assumed that better anti-neuroinflammatory performance of LoE than CfA in LPS-activated primary microglia could be a result of synergism of the components of the extract and the lipophilic nature of RsA as the main phenolic acid of LoE. Considering the fact that LoE shows high antioxidant capacity and lacks PzAl, it is anticipated that LoE is considered as a reliable substitute to the extract of the natural root of L. officinale and plays a key role in the preparation of neuroprotective pharmaceutical formula.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.2174/1389201021666201104145439DOI Listing
November 2020

Mechanism of antibodies purification by protein A.

Anal Biochem 2020 11 20;609:113909. Epub 2020 Aug 20.

Medicinal Plants and Drugs Research Institute, Shahid Beheshti University, G.C, Evin, P.O.Box: 19835-389, Tehran, Iran. Electronic address:

Protein A, a major cell wall component of Staphylococcus aureus, is one of the first immunoglobulin-binding proteins that is discovered about 80 years ago. However, a great deal of development in both purification methods and application of antibodies in treatment have been done. There are many publications based on the untargeted (size exclusion, ion exchange and hydrophobic interactions) and targeted (affinity) methods by scientists in academic/industry groups. In this review, we have focused on the study of both native and engineered Protein A to understand its mechanism in the purification of antibodies. What domain of Protein A dose interact with antibody? Where are contact regions? What is the non-covalent interaction mechanism of Protein A and antibody? Does alkaline condition, in the washing step, influence on antibody structure and activity? On the other hand, the immobilization of Protein A on various sorbents such as agarose, silica, polysaccharide, polymers, and magnetic nanoparticles have investigated. Also, the application of Protein A as biosensor for detection of the antibody is discussed. We have tried to find interesting and stimulating answers to all these questions.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ab.2020.113909DOI Listing
November 2020

Production of phenolic acids in hairy root cultures of medicinal plant L. in response to elicitors.

Mol Biol Res Commun 2020 Apr;9(1):23-34

Department of Plant Bioproducts, National Institute of Genetic Engineering and Biotechnology (NIGEB), Tehran, Iran.

In this study, hairy root induction in leaf and stem explants of using various strains was established for the first time. Although inoculation of explants by immersion method resulted in tissue necrosis, direct injection of explants by all examined strains (A13,R318,A4,GMI 9534 and ATCC15834) was effective. All different parts of the stem were susceptible to infection. However, the middle and lower internodes showed a higher rate of transformation. Among the different strains, the strain A13 exhibited the highest infection efficiency (almost 75% of the explants). A13 and R318-infected hairy roots showed the highest biomass production (close to 60 mg/flask), while infection with GMI 9534 produced the highest content of phenolic acids. Finally, the effect of phytohormone elicitation on hairy root growth and phenolic acid biosynthesis was investigated. A substantial increase in root growth and phenolic acids accumulation was obtained followed by 0.3 mg L IBA and 100 µM MeJA treatment, respectively.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.22099/mbrc.2020.36031.1475DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7275824PMC
April 2020

A click tyrosine zwitterionic stationary phases for hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography.

J Chromatogr A 2020 Jun 13;1621:461045. Epub 2020 Mar 13.

Medicinal Plants and Drugs Research Institute, Shahid Beheshti University, G.C., Evin, Tehran, Iran. Electronic address:

New zwitterionic (ZIC) stationary phases (SPs) are synthesized with the click and conventional bonding of tyrosine to silica gel. Infrared spectra and elemental analysis demonstrate the successful click and conventional bonding of this ZIC group on silica particles by the surface coverage including 2.36 and 0.75 µm m, respectively. Given the above-mentioned explanation, the present study evaluated the retention mechanism and chromatographic manners of polar compounds on these new materials under hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography (HILIC) conditions. Based on the results, the Click-Tyrosine Stationary Phase provided good HILIC characteristics when it was applied to separate phenolic compounds, amino acids, alkaloids, and nucleobases compared to bare silica gel SP and even conventional tyrosine SPs. Further, this new Click-Tyrosine-SP represented appropriate HILIC features and column efficiency (the theoretical plate number was up to 50,000 plates m for thebaine). Furthermore, the study investigated the effect of solute polarity (the number of the hydroxyl group of phenolic compounds) and hydrophobicity (the number of the side chain of aliphatic amino acids) on retention behaviors. Finally, some important factors were studied as the potential variables for guiding the retention behavior of the polar compound in HILIC condition including solvent composition, salt concentration, and the buffer pH of the mobile phase.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.chroma.2020.461045DOI Listing
June 2020

Health risk assessment of neonicotinoid insecticide residues in pistachio using a QuEChERS-based method in combination with HPLC-UV.

Biomed Chromatogr 2020 Mar 17;34(3):e4747. Epub 2020 Jan 17.

Pharmaceutical and Drug Industries Research Division, Pharmaceutical and Medicinal Chemistry Department, National Research Centre, Cairo, Egypt.

There is an increasing need to address the potential risks arising from combined exposures to multiple residues from pesticides in the diet. Pesticide residue-related pollution is a problem that arises because of the increased use of pesticides in agriculture to meet the growing demands of food production. In this study, pesticide residue data were obtained based on an optimized extraction method. For this purpose, we established a method based on quick, easy, cheap, effective, rugged, and safe (QuEChERS) extraction for simultaneous determination of imidacloprid (IMI) and acetamiprid (ACT) in pistachio nuts. The parameters influencing the QuEChERS method were the sample-to-water ratio and adsorbent amounts. As a result, both were optimized to improve the recovery of the analytes as well as the clean-up efficiency of the pistachio matrix. Our results indicated that a freeze-out step and use of primary and secondary amines as an adsorbent led to much cleaner chromatograms with lower baseline drift, without using graphitized carbon black and C -based adsorbent, which reduced both cost and time of analysis. Following extraction, the pesticide residues were separated and quantified by reverse-phase HPLC. For validation purposes, recovery studies were carried out using a concentration range from 20 to 2500 μg/L at nine levels. The suitable linearity, precision, and accuracy were obtained with HPLC-UV with recoveries of 70.37%-89.80% for IMI and 81.05%-113.57% for ACT, with relative standard deviations <12%. The validated method was successfully applied to the analysis of pistachio samples collected from a field trial to estimate maximum residue limits. There was no significant health risk for consumers via pistachio consumption.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/bmc.4747DOI Listing
March 2020

Pyrrolizidine Alkaloids-Free Extract from the Cell Culture of Lithospermum officinale with High Antioxidant Capacity.

Appl Biochem Biotechnol 2019 Mar 27;187(3):744-752. Epub 2018 Jul 27.

National Institute for Genetic Engineering and Biotechnology, P.O. Box: 14965/161, Tehran, Iran.

The benefits of Lithospermum officinale has encouraged people to continue using its extract (CAS 90063-58-4) in both medicinal and cosmetic industries despite the fact that chemical analysis confirms the presence of pyrrolizidine alkaloids (PAs) in the extract. While the cultivation of L. officinale takes, at least, 2 years to produce usable crops, its callus culture proliferated 8.3 times with 4.9-fold biomass in less than 30 days under the applied conditions in this study. Under the applied conditions, the cell extract contained no toxic PAs while phenylpropanoid pathway was active toward phenolic acids formation not toward naphthoquinone derivatives. Rosmarinic acid was produced as the main constituent. Total phenolic content and antioxidant capacity of the proliferated cell extracts were similar to those of the extracts of the natural plant tissues, in particular from the root. These results support the idea that the extract of L. officinale cells can be a reliable substitute for the extract of the natural plant tissues.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s12010-018-2830-3DOI Listing
March 2019

Evaluation of hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography stationary phases for analysis of opium alkaloids.

J Chromatogr A 2017 Aug 30;1511:77-84. Epub 2017 Jun 30.

Pharmaceutical and Medicinal Chemistry Department, Pharmaceutical and Drug Industries Research Division, National Research Centre, Dokki, Giza 12622, Egypt. Electronic address:

The separation of a mixture containing five major opium alkaloids, namely morphine, codeine, thebaine, noscapine and papaverine has been investigated in hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography (HILIC) mode using five different stationary phases: bare silica, zwitterion, aminopropyl, diol and cyanopropyl. In order to propose the appropriate column for separation and purification, retention behaviors of the five natural opioids have been studied on mentioned HILIC stationary phases. The mechanism of separation in diverse HILIC media, based on the formation of water-rich layer on surface of the HILIC stationary phases and the physicochemical properties of opium alkaloids, such as pKa (acidic pK) and the octanol-water distribution coefficient (log Do/w) are discussed. Chromatographic responses including modified limit of detection LOD, signal to noise ratio (S/N), and defined modified R have considered for suggestion of the suitable column for quantitative/qualitative and preparative purposes. According to the obtained results, diol stationary phase is best suited for analytical chromatography, whereas bare silica and zwitterionic stationary phases are appropriate for preparative applications.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.chroma.2017.06.072DOI Listing
August 2017

Viola plant cyclotide vigno 5 induces mitochondria-mediated apoptosis via cytochrome C release and caspases activation in cervical cancer cells.

Fitoterapia 2016 Mar 2;109:162-8. Epub 2016 Jan 2.

Department of Phytochemistry, Medicinal Plants and Drugs Research Institute, Shahid Beheshti University, G.C., Evin, Tehran, Iran. Electronic address:

Cyclotides describe a unique cyclic peptide family that displays a broad range of biological activities including uterotonic, anti-bacteria, anti-cancer and anti-HIV. The vigno cyclotides consist of vigno 1-10 were reported recently from Viola ignobilis. In the present study, we examined the effects of vigno 5, a natural cyclopeptide from V. ignobilis, on cervical cancer cells and the underlying mechanisms. We found that vigno 5-treated Hela cells were killed off by apoptosis in a dose-dependent manner within 24h, and were characterized by the appearance of nuclear shrinkage, cleavage of poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) and DNA fragmentation. The mitochondrial pathway of apoptosis revealed that cytochrome C is released from mitochondria to cytosol, associated with the activation of caspase-9 and -3, and the cleavage of poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP). Overall, the results indicate that vigno 5 induces apoptosis in part via the mitochondrial pathway, which is associated with a release of cytochrome C and elevated activity of caspase-9 and -3 in Hela cells.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.fitote.2015.12.021DOI Listing
March 2016

Microwave-assisted extraction of cyclotides from Viola ignobilis.

Anal Biochem 2016 Mar 17;497:83-9. Epub 2015 Dec 17.

Medicinal Plants and Drugs Research Institute, Shahid Beheshti University, Evin, Tehran, Iran. Electronic address:

Cyclotides are an interesting family of circular plant peptides. Their unique three-dimensional structure, comprising a head-to-tail circular backbone chain and three disulfide bonds, confers them stability against thermal, chemical, and enzymatic degradation. Their unique stability under extreme conditions creates an idea about the possibility of using harsh extraction methods such as microwave-assisted extraction (MAE) without affecting their structures. MAE has been introduced as a potent extraction method for extraction of natural compounds, but it is seldom used for peptide and protein extraction. In this work, microwave irradiation was applied to the extraction of cyclotides. The procedure was performed in various steps using a microwave instrument under different conditions. High-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight (MALDI-TOF) results show stability of cyclotide structures on microwave radiation. The influential parameters, including time, temperature, and the ratio of solvents that are affecting the MAE potency, were optimized. Optimal conditions were obtained at 20 min of irradiation time, 1200 W of system power in 60 °C, and methanol/water at the ratio of 90:10 (v/v) as solvent. The comparison of MAE results with maceration extraction shows that there are similarities between cyclotide sequences and extraction yields.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ab.2015.12.001DOI Listing
March 2016
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