Publications by authors named "Mohan S Zalake"

4 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

A Pilot Study Examining the Efficacy of Delivering Colorectal Cancer Screening Messages via Virtual Health Assistants.

Am J Prev Med 2021 Apr 19. Epub 2021 Apr 19.

Department of Computer & Information Science & Engineering, College of Engineering, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida.

Introduction: Patients are more likely to complete colorectal cancer screening when recommended by a race-concordant healthcare provider. Leveraging virtual healthcare assistants to deliver tailored screening interventions may promote adherence to colorectal cancer screening guidelines among diverse patient populations. The purpose of this pilot study is to determine the efficacy of the Agent Leveraging Empathy for eXams virtual healthcare assistant intervention to increase patient intentions to talk to their doctor about colorectal cancer screening. It also examines the influence of animation and race concordance on intentions to complete colorectal cancer screening.

Methods: White and Black adults (N=1,363) aged 50-73 years and not adherent to colorectal cancer screening guidelines were recruited from Qualtrics Panels in 2018 to participate in a 3-arm (animated virtual healthcare assistant, static virtual healthcare assistant, attention control) message design experiment. In 2020, a probit regression model was used to identify the intervention effects.

Results: Participants assigned to the animated virtual healthcare assistant (p<0.01) reported higher intentions to talk to their doctor about colorectal cancer screening than participants assigned to the other conditions. There was a significant effect of race concordance on colorectal cancer screening intentions but only in the static virtual healthcare assistant condition (p=0.04). Participant race, age, trust in healthcare providers, health literacy, and cancer information overload were also significant predictors of colorectal cancer screening intentions.

Conclusions: Animated virtual healthcare assistants were efficacious compared with the static virtual healthcare assistant and attention control conditions. The influence of race concordance between source and participant was inconsistent across conditions. This warrants additional investigation in future studies given the potential for virtual healthcare assistant‒assisted interventions to promote colorectal cancer screening within guidelines.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.amepre.2021.01.014DOI Listing
April 2021

A Subjective Culture Approach to Cancer Prevention: Rural Black and White Adults' Perceptions of Using Virtual Health Assistants to Promote Colorectal Cancer Screening.

Health Commun 2021 Apr 20:1-12. Epub 2021 Apr 20.

STEM Translational Communication Center, University of Florida.

In the US, Black adults are less likely than White adults to be screened for colorectal cancer (CRC). This study uses a subjective culture approach to describe and compare perceptions of a CRC screening intervention delivered via virtual health assistants (VHAs) among rural Black and White study participants. We analyzed 28 focus groups with Black ( = 85) and White ( = 69) adults aged 50-73. Participants, largely recruited through community engagement efforts, tested the VHA intervention on mobile phones provided by the research team. Moderated discussions were recorded, transcribed, and analyzed using thematic analysis. All groups preferred the VHA to be friendly. Other important cues included trustworthiness, authority, and expertise. Black participants expressed a preference for receiving information about their CRC risk from the VHA compared with White adults. Black participants also expressed the importance of sharing the intervention and the CRC screening messages with younger members of their networks, including family members who could benefit from screening messages before reaching the recommended age for screening. The key similarities and differences between Black and White adults' perceptions of the intervention that were identified in this study can help inform future efforts to develop effective communication strategies and reduce cancer screening inequities.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/10410236.2021.1910166DOI Listing
April 2021

Tailoring virtual human-delivered interventions: A digital intervention promoting colorectal cancer screening for Black women.

Psychooncology 2020 12 15;29(12):2048-2056. Epub 2020 Sep 15.

STEM Translational Communication Center, College of Journalism & Communications, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida, USA.

Objective: Despite efforts to reduce cancer disparities, Black women remain underrepresented in cancer research. Virtual health assistants (VHAs) are one promising digital technology for communicating health messages and promoting health behaviors to diverse populations. This study describes participant responses to a VHA-delivered intervention promoting colorectal cancer (CRC) screening with a home-stool test.

Methods: We recruited 53 non-Hispanic Black women 50 to 73 years old to participate in focus groups and think-aloud interviews and test a web-based intervention delivered by a race- and gender-concordant VHA. A user-centered design approach prioritized modifications to three successive versions of the intervention based on participants' comments.

Results: Participants identified 26 cues relating to components of the VHA's credibility, including trustworthiness, expertise, and authority. Comments on early versions revealed preferences for communicating with a human doctor and negative critiques of the VHA's appearance and movements. Modifications to specific cues improved the user experience, and participants expressed increased willingness to engage with later versions of the VHA and the screening messages it delivered. Informed by the Modality, Agency, Interactivity, Navigability Model, we present a framework for developing credible VHA-delivered cancer screening messages.

Conclusions: VHAs provide a systematic way to deliver health information. A culturally sensitive intervention designed for credibility promoted user interest in engaging with guideline-concordant CRC screening messages. We present strategies for effectively using cues to engage audiences with health messages, which can be applied to future research in varying contexts.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/pon.5538DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7821126PMC
December 2020

Tailoring virtual human-delivered interventions: A digital intervention promoting colorectal cancer screening for Black women.

Psychooncology 2020 12 15;29(12):2048-2056. Epub 2020 Sep 15.

STEM Translational Communication Center, College of Journalism & Communications, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida, USA.

Objective: Despite efforts to reduce cancer disparities, Black women remain underrepresented in cancer research. Virtual health assistants (VHAs) are one promising digital technology for communicating health messages and promoting health behaviors to diverse populations. This study describes participant responses to a VHA-delivered intervention promoting colorectal cancer (CRC) screening with a home-stool test.

Methods: We recruited 53 non-Hispanic Black women 50 to 73 years old to participate in focus groups and think-aloud interviews and test a web-based intervention delivered by a race- and gender-concordant VHA. A user-centered design approach prioritized modifications to three successive versions of the intervention based on participants' comments.

Results: Participants identified 26 cues relating to components of the VHA's credibility, including trustworthiness, expertise, and authority. Comments on early versions revealed preferences for communicating with a human doctor and negative critiques of the VHA's appearance and movements. Modifications to specific cues improved the user experience, and participants expressed increased willingness to engage with later versions of the VHA and the screening messages it delivered. Informed by the Modality, Agency, Interactivity, Navigability Model, we present a framework for developing credible VHA-delivered cancer screening messages.

Conclusions: VHAs provide a systematic way to deliver health information. A culturally sensitive intervention designed for credibility promoted user interest in engaging with guideline-concordant CRC screening messages. We present strategies for effectively using cues to engage audiences with health messages, which can be applied to future research in varying contexts.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/pon.5538DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7821126PMC
December 2020