Publications by authors named "Mohan Harikrishnan"

3 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

To exclude or to accumulate? Revealing the role of the sodium HKT1;5 transporter in plant adaptive responses to varying soil salinity.

Plant Physiol Biochem 2021 Dec 19;169:333-342. Epub 2021 Nov 19.

School of Science, Hawkesbury Institute for the Environment, Western Sydney University, Penrith, NSW, 2751, Australia.

Arid/semi-arid and coastal agricultural areas of the world are especially vulnerable to climate change-driven soil salinity. Salinity tolerance in plants is a complex trait, with salinity negatively affecting crop yield. Plants adopt a range of mechanisms to combat salinity, with many transporter genes being implicated in Na-partitioning processes. Within these, the high-affinity K (HKT) family of transporters play a critical role in K and Na homeostasis in plants. Among HKT transporters, Type I transporters are Na-specific. While Arabidopsis has only one Na  -specific HKT (AtHKT1;1), cereal crops have a multiplicity of Type I and II HKT transporters. AtHKT1; 1 (Arabidopsis thaliana) and HKT1; 5 (cereal crops) 'exclude' Na from the xylem into xylem parenchyma in the root, reducing shoot Na and hence, confer sodium tolerance. However, more recent data from Arabidopsis and crop species show that AtHKT1;1/HKT1;5 alleles have a strong genetic association with 'shoot sodium accumulation' and concomitant salt tolerance. The review tries to resolve these two seemingly contradictory effects of AtHKT1;1/HKT1;5 operation (shoot exclusion vs shoot accumulation), both conferring salinity tolerance and suggests that contrasting phenotypes are attributable to either hyper-functional or weak AtHKT1;1/HKT1;5 alleles/haplotypes and are under strong selection by soil salinity levels. It also suggests that opposite balancing mechanisms involving xylem ion loading in these contrasting phenotypes exist that require transporters such as SOS1 and CCC. While HKT1; 5 is a crucial but not sole determinant of salinity tolerance, investigation of the adaptive benefit(s) conferred by naturally occurring intermediate HKT1;5 alleles will be important under a climate change scenario.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.plaphy.2021.11.030DOI Listing
December 2021

Tolerance to drought and salt stress in plants: Unraveling the signaling networks.

Front Plant Sci 2014 22;5:151. Epub 2014 Apr 22.

Department of Biochemistry and Physiology of Plants, Faculty of Biology, Bielefeld University Bielefeld, Germany.

Tolerance of plants to abiotic stressors such as drought and salinity is triggered by complex multicomponent signaling pathways to restore cellular homeostasis and promote survival. Major plant transcription factor families such as bZIP, NAC, AP2/ERF, and MYB orchestrate regulatory networks underlying abiotic stress tolerance. Sucrose non-fermenting 1-related protein kinase 2 and mitogen-activated protein kinase pathways contribute to initiation of stress adaptive downstream responses and promote plant growth and development. As a convergent point of multiple abiotic cues, cellular effects of environmental stresses are not only imbalances of ionic and osmotic homeostasis but also impaired photosynthesis, cellular energy depletion, and redox imbalances. Recent evidence of regulatory systems that link sensing and signaling of environmental conditions and the intracellular redox status have shed light on interfaces of stress and energy signaling. ROS (reactive oxygen species) cause severe cellular damage by peroxidation and de-esterification of membrane-lipids, however, current models also define a pivotal signaling function of ROS in triggering tolerance against stress. Recent research advances suggest and support a regulatory role of ROS in the cross talks of stress triggered hormonal signaling such as the abscisic acid pathway and endogenously induced redox and metabolite signals. Here, we discuss and review the versatile molecular convergence in the abiotic stress responsive signaling networks in the context of ROS and lipid-derived signals and the specific role of stomatal signaling.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3389/fpls.2014.00151DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4001066PMC
June 2014

Gibberellins and abscisic acid signal crosstalk: living and developing under unfavorable conditions.

Plant Cell Rep 2013 Jul 23;32(7):1007-16. Epub 2013 Mar 23.

Department of Biochemistry and Physiology of Plants, Faculty of Biology, Bielefeld University, 33615 Bielefeld, Germany.

Plants adapt to adverse environments by integrating growth and development to environmentally activated cues. Within the adaptive signaling networks, plant hormones tightly control convergent developmental and stress adaptive processes and coordinate cellular responses to external and internal conditions. Recent studies have uncovered novel antagonizing roles of the plant hormones gibberellin (GA) and abscisic acid (ABA) in integrating growth and development in plants with environmental signaling. According to current concepts, GRAS transcription factors of the DELLA and SCARECROW-LIKE (SCL) types have a key role as major growth regulators and have pivotal functions in modulating GA signaling. Significantly, current models emphasize a function of DELLA proteins as central regulators in GA homeostasis. DELLA proteins interact with the cellular GA receptor GID1 (GA-INSENSITIVE DWARF1) and degradation of DELLAs activates the function of GA. Supplementary to the prevailing view of a pivotal role of GRAS family transcriptional factors in plant growth regulation, recent work has suggested that the DELLA and SCL proteins integrate generic GA responses into ABA-controlled abiotic stress tolerance. Here, we review and discuss how GRAS type proteins influence plant development and versatile adaptation as hubs in GA and ABA triggered signaling pathways.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00299-013-1409-2DOI Listing
July 2013
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