Publications by authors named "Mohammed M Fathalla"

2 Publications

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Oral misoprostol reduces vaginal bleeding following surgical evacuation for first trimester spontaneous abortion.

Int J Gynaecol Obstet 2009 Nov 18;107(2):117-20. Epub 2009 Jul 18.

Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Women's Health Centre, Assiut University, Assiut, Egypt.

Objective: To assess the effectiveness and tolerability of misoprostol to reduce the amount and duration of vaginal bleeding following surgical evacuation for first trimester spontaneous abortion.

Methods: A total of 160 patients who underwent surgical evacuation for first trimester spontaneous abortion between 8 and 12 weeks of pregnancy were randomized into 2 groups to receive either 200 microg of oral misoprostol immediately after evacuation followed every 6 hours for 48 hours or no misoprostol. Pain scores, duration and amount of bleeding, and endometrial thickness were assessed over 10 days.

Results: Women who received misoprostol had significantly fewer bleeding days after evacuation (4.11+/-2.69 vs 5.89+/-3.06; P<0.001), fewer patients reported vaginal bleeding lasting 10 days or more (3.8% vs 15.0%; P=0.014), and endometrial thickness 10 days after evacuation was less (6.25+/-2.38 vs 7.23+/-1.94; P=0.05). Pain scores were comparable in both groups (1.54+/-0.65 vs 1.63+/-0.83; P=0.40) after 10 days.

Conclusion: Oral misoprostol is effective in reducing the prevalence and amount of vaginal bleeding after surgical evacuation for first trimester spontaneous abortion.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ijgo.2009.06.008DOI Listing
November 2009

Sexual and reproductive health for all: a call for action.

Lancet 2006 Dec;368(9552):2095-100

Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Assiut University, Egypt.

At the United Nations International Conference on Population and Development in Cairo in 1994, the international community agreed to make reproductive health care universally available no later than 2015. After a 5-year review of progress towards implementation of the Cairo programme of action, that commitment was extended to include sexual, as well as reproductive, health and rights. Although progress has been made towards this commitment, it has fallen a long way short of the original goal. We argue that sexual and reproductive health for all is an achievable goal--if cost-effective interventions are properly scaled up; political commitment is revitalised; and financial resources are mobilised, rationally allocated, and more effectively used. National action will need to be backed up by international action. Sustained effort is needed by governments in developing countries and in the donor community, by inter-governmental organisations, non-governmental organisations, civil society groups, the women's health movement, philanthropic foundations, the private for-profit sector, the health profession, and the research community.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/S0140-6736(06)69483-XDOI Listing
December 2006