Publications by authors named "Mohammed J R Ghori"

6 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Integrating common and rare genetic variation in diverse human populations.

Nature 2010 Sep;467(7311):52-8

Broad Institute, 7 Cambridge Center, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02138, USA.

Despite great progress in identifying genetic variants that influence human disease, most inherited risk remains unexplained. A more complete understanding requires genome-wide studies that fully examine less common alleles in populations with a wide range of ancestry. To inform the design and interpretation of such studies, we genotyped 1.6 million common single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in 1,184 reference individuals from 11 global populations, and sequenced ten 100-kilobase regions in 692 of these individuals. This integrated data set of common and rare alleles, called 'HapMap 3', includes both SNPs and copy number polymorphisms (CNPs). We characterized population-specific differences among low-frequency variants, measured the improvement in imputation accuracy afforded by the larger reference panel, especially in imputing SNPs with a minor allele frequency of
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/nature09298DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3173859PMC
September 2010

A genome-wide meta-analysis identifies 22 loci associated with eight hematological parameters in the HaemGen consortium.

Nat Genet 2009 Nov 11;41(11):1182-90. Epub 2009 Oct 11.

Human Genetics, Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute, Hinxton, UK.

The number and volume of cells in the blood affect a wide range of disorders including cancer and cardiovascular, metabolic, infectious and immune conditions. We consider here the genetic variation in eight clinically relevant hematological parameters, including hemoglobin levels, red and white blood cell counts and platelet counts and volume. We describe common variants within 22 genetic loci reproducibly associated with these hematological parameters in 13,943 samples from six European population-based studies, including 6 associated with red blood cell parameters, 15 associated with platelet parameters and 1 associated with total white blood cell count. We further identified a long-range haplotype at 12q24 associated with coronary artery disease and myocardial infarction in 9,479 cases and 10,527 controls. We show that this haplotype demonstrates extensive disease pleiotropy, as it contains known risk loci for type 1 diabetes, hypertension and celiac disease and has been spread by a selective sweep specific to European and geographically nearby populations.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/ng.467DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3108459PMC
November 2009

Meta-analysis of genome-wide scans for human adult stature identifies novel Loci and associations with measures of skeletal frame size.

PLoS Genet 2009 Apr 3;5(4):e1000445. Epub 2009 Apr 3.

Human Genetics Department, Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute, Hinxton, Cambridge, United Kingdom.

Recent genome-wide (GW) scans have identified several independent loci affecting human stature, but their contribution through the different skeletal components of height is still poorly understood. We carried out a genome-wide scan in 12,611 participants, followed by replication in an additional 7,187 individuals, and identified 17 genomic regions with GW-significant association with height. Of these, two are entirely novel (rs11809207 in CATSPER4, combined P-value = 6.1x10(-8) and rs910316 in TMED10, P-value = 1.4x10(-7)) and two had previously been described with weak statistical support (rs10472828 in NPR3, P-value = 3x10(-7) and rs849141 in JAZF1, P-value = 3.2x10(-11)). One locus (rs1182188 at GNA12) identifies the first height eQTL. We also assessed the contribution of height loci to the upper- (trunk) and lower-body (hip axis and femur) skeletal components of height. We find evidence for several loci associated with trunk length (including rs6570507 in GPR126, P-value = 4x10(-5) and rs6817306 in LCORL, P-value = 4x10(-4)), hip axis length (including rs6830062 at LCORL, P-value = 4.8x10(-4) and rs4911494 at UQCC, P-value = 1.9x10(-4)), and femur length (including rs710841 at PRKG2, P-value = 2.4x10(-5) and rs10946808 at HIST1H1D, P-value = 6.4x10(-6)). Finally, we used conditional analyses to explore a possible differential contribution of the height loci to these different skeletal size measurements. In addition to validating four novel loci controlling adult stature, our study represents the first effort to assess the contribution of genetic loci to three skeletal components of height. Further statistical tests in larger numbers of individuals will be required to verify if the height loci affect height preferentially through these subcomponents of height.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1371/journal.pgen.1000445DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2661236PMC
April 2009

The largest prospective warfarin-treated cohort supports genetic forecasting.

Blood 2009 Jan 23;113(4):784-92. Epub 2008 Jun 23.

Department of Medical Sciences, Clinical Pharmacology, Uppsala University Hospital, Uppsala, Sweden.

Genetic variants of cytochrome P450 2C9 (CYP2C9) and vitamin K epoxide reductase (VKORC1) are known to influence warfarin dose, but the effect of other genes has not been fully elucidated. We genotyped 183 polymorphisms in 29 candidate genes in 1496 Swedish patients starting warfarin treatment, and tested for association with response. CYP2C9*2 and *3 explained 12% (P = 6.63 x 10(-34)) of the variation in warfarin dose, while a single VKORC1 SNP explained 30% (P = 9.82 x 10(-100)). No SNP outside the CYP2C gene cluster and VKORC1 regions was significantly associated with dose after correction for multiple testing. During initiation of therapy, homozygosity for CYP2C9 and VKORC1 variant alleles increased the risk of over-anticoagulation, hazard ratios 21.84 (95% CI 9.46; 50.42) and 4.56 (95% CI 2.85; 7.30), respectively. One of 8 patients with CYP2C9*3/*3 (12.5%) experienced severe bleeding during the first month compared with 0.27% of other patients (P = .066). A multiple regression model using the predictors CYP2C9, VKORC1, age, sex, and druginteractions explained 59% of the variance in warfarin dose, and 53% in an independent sample of 181 Swedish individuals. In conclusion, CYP2C9 and VKORC1 significantly influenced warfarin dose and predicted individuals predisposed to unstable anticoagulation. Our results strongly support that initiation of warfarin guided by pharmacogenetics would improve clinical outcome.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1182/blood-2008-04-149070DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2630264PMC
January 2009

Repeated replication and a prospective meta-analysis of the association between chromosome 9p21.3 and coronary artery disease.

Circulation 2008 Apr 24;117(13):1675-84. Epub 2008 Mar 24.

Medizinische Klinik II, Universität zu Lübeck, Lübeck, Germany.

Background: Recently, genome-wide association studies identified variants on chromosome 9p21.3 as affecting the risk of coronary artery disease (CAD). We investigated the association of this locus with CAD in 7 case-control studies and undertook a meta-analysis.

Methods And Results: A single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP), rs1333049, representing the 9p21.3 locus, was genotyped in 7 case-control studies involving a total of 4645 patients with myocardial infarction or CAD and 5177 controls. The mode of inheritance was determined. In addition, in 5 of the 7 studies, we genotyped 3 additional SNPs to assess a risk-associated haplotype (ACAC). Finally, a meta-analysis of the present data and previously published samples was conducted. A limited fine mapping of the locus was performed. The risk allele (C) of the lead SNP, rs1333049, was uniformly associated with CAD in each study (P<0.05). In a pooled analysis, the odds ratio per copy of the risk allele was 1.29 (95% confidence interval, 1.22 to 1.37; P=0.0001). Haplotype analysis further suggested that this effect was not homogeneous across the haplotypic background (test for interaction, P=0.0079). An autosomal-additive mode of inheritance best explained the underlying association. The meta-analysis of the rs1333049 SNP in 12,004 cases and 28,949 controls increased the overall level of evidence for association with CAD to P=6.04x10(-10) (odds ratio, 1.24; 95% confidence interval, 1.20 to 1.29). Genotyping of 31 additional SNPs in the region identified several with a highly significant association with CAD, but none had predictive information beyond that of the rs1333049 SNP.

Conclusions: This broad replication provides unprecedented evidence for association between genetic variants at chromosome 9p21.3 and risk of CAD.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1161/CIRCULATIONAHA.107.730614DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2689930PMC
April 2008

Association scan of 14,500 nonsynonymous SNPs in four diseases identifies autoimmunity variants.

Nat Genet 2007 Nov 21;39(11):1329-37. Epub 2007 Oct 21.

Genetic Epidemiology Group, Department of Health Sciences, University of Leicester, Adrian Building, University Road, Leicester LE1 7RH, UK.

We have genotyped 14,436 nonsynonymous SNPs (nsSNPs) and 897 major histocompatibility complex (MHC) tag SNPs from 1,000 independent cases of ankylosing spondylitis (AS), autoimmune thyroid disease (AITD), multiple sclerosis (MS) and breast cancer (BC). Comparing these data against a common control dataset derived from 1,500 randomly selected healthy British individuals, we report initial association and independent replication in a North American sample of two new loci related to ankylosing spondylitis, ARTS1 and IL23R, and confirmation of the previously reported association of AITD with TSHR and FCRL3. These findings, enabled in part by increased statistical power resulting from the expansion of the control reference group to include individuals from the other disease groups, highlight notable new possibilities for autoimmune regulation and suggest that IL23R may be a common susceptibility factor for the major 'seronegative' diseases.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/ng.2007.17DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2680141PMC
November 2007