Publications by authors named "Mohammed A Alvi"

14 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Patient-reported outcome improvements at 24-month follow-up after fusion added to decompression for grade I degenerative lumbar spondylolisthesis: a multicenter study using the Quality Outcomes Database.

J Neurosurg Spine 2021 Apr 16:1-10. Epub 2021 Apr 16.

16Department of Neurological Surgery, University of California, San Francisco, California.

Objective: The ideal surgical management of grade I lumbar spondylolisthesis has not been determined despite extensive prior investigations. In this cohort study, the authors used data from the large, multicenter, prospectively collected Quality Outcomes Database to bridge the gap between the findings in previous randomized trials and those in a more heterogeneous population treated in a typical practice. The objective was to assess the difference in patient-reported outcomes among patients undergoing decompression alone or decompression plus fusion.

Methods: The primary outcome measure was change in 24-month Oswestry Disability Index (ODI) scores. The minimal clinically important difference (MCID) in ODI score change and 30% change in ODI score at 24 months were also evaluated. After adjusting for patient-specific and clinical factors, multivariable linear and logistic regressions were employed to evaluate the impact of fusion on outcomes. To account for differences in age, sex, body mass index, and baseline listhesis, a sensitivity analysis was performed using propensity score analysis to match patients undergoing decompression only with those undergoing decompression and fusion.

Results: In total, 608 patients who had grade I lumbar spondylolisthesis were identified (85.5% with at least 24 months of follow-up); 140 (23.0%) underwent decompression alone and 468 (77.0%) underwent decompression and fusion. The 24-month change in ODI score was significantly greater in the fusion plus decompression group than in the decompression-only group (-25.8 ± 20.0 vs -15.2 ± 19.8, p < 0.001). Fusion remained independently associated with 24-month ODI score change (B = -7.05, 95% CI -10.70 to -3.39, p ≤ 0.001) in multivariable regression analysis, as well as with achieving the MCID for the ODI score (OR 1.767, 95% CI 1.058-2.944, p = 0.029) and 30% change in ODI score (OR 2.371, 95% CI 1.286-4.371, p = 0.005). Propensity score analysis resulted in 94 patients in the decompression-only group matched 1 to 1 with 94 patients in the fusion group. The addition of fusion to decompression remained a significant predictor of 24-month change in the ODI score (B = 2.796, 95% CI 2.228-13.275, p = 0.006) and of achieving the 24-month MCID ODI score (OR 2.898, 95% CI 1.214-6.914, p = 0.016) and 24-month 30% change in ODI score (OR 2.300, 95% CI 1.014-5.216, p = 0.046).

Conclusions: These results suggest that decompression plus fusion in patients with grade I lumbar spondylolisthesis may be associated with superior outcomes at 24 months compared with decompression alone, both in reduction of disability and in achieving clinically meaningful improvement. Longer-term follow-up is warranted to assess whether this effect is sustained.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3171/2020.9.SPINE201082DOI Listing
April 2021

Medical Malpractice and Vestibular Schwannomas: A Nationwide Review.

World Neurosurg 2021 06 26;150:e714-e726. Epub 2021 Mar 26.

Department of Neurological Surgery, Montefiore Medical Center, Bronx, New York, USA.

Objective: Most surgeons face litigation related to the care of their patients, with specialties including neurosurgery facing a particularly high risk. Diagnosis and management of vestibular schwannomas can be challenging, potentially giving rise to medicolegal proceedings. Accordingly, a full appreciation of the medicolegal implications of treating these challenging tumors is warranted.

Methods: A systematic search of the Westlaw Edge legal database was conducted to identify all cases of medicolegal proceedings related to the management of vestibular schwannomas. All cases identified by the search were screened in full, and relevant cases included for analysis. Variables pertaining to the nature of the case and legal outcomes were extracted.

Results: A total of 38 cases were included in this analysis from 11 U.S. states. Failure to diagnose and negligent surgery were the most common allegations. Neurosurgeons were the most frequently implicated specialists followed by otolaryngologists and radiologists. A verdict was reached in 30 cases, with the jury finding in favor of the defendant(s) in most cases (n = 26, 87.0%), a proportion that increased across each decade of the study period. Damages were paid out in 11 cases, with a mean value of $1,534,446. Mean value of damages paid in verdicts in favor of the plaintiff were larger than those in settlements ($2,116,543 and $1,385,457, respectively).

Conclusions: The data presented provide a comprehensive overview of medicolegal proceedings related to the management of vestibular schwannomas. This study provides clinicians with a greater appreciation of the medicolegal implications of treating vestibular schwannomas.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.wneu.2021.03.093DOI Listing
June 2021

Diffuse Gliomas of the Brainstem and Cerebellum in Adults Show Molecular Heterogeneity.

Am J Surg Pathol 2021 08;45(8):1082-1090

Departments of Laboratory Medicine and Pathology.

Posterior fossa (PF) diffuse gliomas in pediatric patients frequently harbor the H3 K27M mutation. Among adults, PF diffuse gliomas are rare, with limited data regarding molecular features and clinical outcomes. We identified 28 adult PF diffuse glioma patients (17 males; median: 50 y, range: 19 to 78 y), with surgery performed at our institution (13 brainstem; 15 cerebellum). Histologic subtypes included anaplastic astrocytoma (n=21), glioblastoma (n=6), and diffuse astrocytoma (n=1). Immunohistochemistry was performed for H3 K27M (n=26), IDH1-R132H (n=28), and ATRX (n=28). A 150-gene neuro-oncology-targeted next-generation sequencing panel was attempted in 24/28, with sufficient informative material in 15 (51.7%). Tumors comprised 4 distinct groups: driver mutations in H3F3A (brainstem=4; cerebellum=2), IDH1 (brainstem=4; cerebellum=4), TERT promotor mutation (brainstem=0; cerebellum=3), and none of these (n=5), with the latter harboring mutations of TP53, PDGFRA, ATRX, NF1, and RB1. All TERT promoter-mutant cases were IDH-wild-type and arose within the cerebellum. To date, 20 patients have died of disease, with a median survival of 16.3 months, 1-year survival of 67.5%. Median survival within the subgroups included: H3F3A=16.4 months, IDH mutant=113.4 months, and TERT promoter mutant=12.9 months. These findings suggest that PF diffuse gliomas affecting adults show molecular heterogeneity, which may be associated with patient outcomes and possible response to therapy, and supports the utility of molecular testing in these tumors.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/PAS.0000000000001690DOI Listing
August 2021

"July Effect" Revisited: July Surgeries at Residency Training Programs are Associated with Equivalent Long-term Clinical Outcomes Following Lumbar Spondylolisthesis Surgery.

Spine (Phila Pa 1976) 2021 Jun;46(12):836-843

Department of Neurological Surgery, University of California, San Francisco, Ca.

Study Design: Retrospective analysis of a prospective registry.

Objective: We utilized the Quality Outcomes Database (QOD) registry to investigate the "July Effect" at QOD spondylolisthesis module sites with residency trainees.

Summary Of Background Data: There is a paucity of investigation on the long-term outcomes following surgeries involving new trainees utilizing high-quality, prospectively collected data.

Methods: This was an analysis of 608 patients who underwent single-segment surgery for grade 1 degenerative lumbar spondylolisthesis at 12 high-enrolling sites. Surgeries were classified as occurring in July or not in July (non-July). Outcomes collected included estimated blood loss, length of stay, operative time, discharge disposition, complications, reoperation and readmission rates, and patient-reported outcomes (Oswestry Disability Index [ODI], Numeric Rating Scale [NRS] Back Pain, NRS Leg Pain, EuroQol-5D [EQ-5D] and the North American Spine Society [NASS] Satisfaction Questionnaire). Propensity score-matched analyses were utilized to compare postoperative outcomes and complication rates between the July and non-July groups.

Results: Three hundred seventy-one surgeries occurred at centers with a residency training program with 21 (5.7%) taking place in July. In propensity score-matched analyses, July surgeries were associated with longer operative times ( average treatment effect = 22.4 minutes longer, 95% confidence interval 0.9-449.0, P = 0.041). Otherwise, July surgeries were not associated with significantly different outcomes for the remaining perioperative parameters (estimated blood loss, length of stay, discharge disposition, postoperative complications), overall reoperation rates, 3-month readmission rates, and 24-month ODI, NRS back pain, NRS leg pain, EQ-5D, and NASS satisfaction score (P > 0.05, all comparisons).

Conclusion: Although July surgeries were associated with longer operative times, there were no associations with other clinical outcomes compared to non-July surgeries following lumbar spondylolisthesis surgery. These findings may be due to the increased attending supervision and intraoperative education during the beginning of the academic year. There is no evidence that the influx of new trainees in July significantly affects long-term patient-centered outcomes.Level of Evidence: 3.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/BRS.0000000000003903DOI Listing
June 2021

Minimally Invasive Versus Open Surgery for Degenerative Spine Disorders for Elderly Patients: Experiences from a Single Institution.

World Neurosurg 2021 02 1;146:e1262-e1269. Epub 2020 Dec 1.

Department of Neurologic Surgery, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota, USA; Mayo Clinic Neuro-informatics Laboratory, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota, USA. Electronic address:

Background: Minimally invasive surgery (MIS) of the spine has been associated with lower complication rates and improved patient-reported outcomes in recent studies. In this study, we aimed to investigate operative and postoperative outcomes associated with both surgical techniques in elderly patients.

Methods: Patients who are 65 years old or older underwent either minimally invasive or open surgery for lumbar degenerative conditions. Patients with a nondegenerative cause such as infection or trauma were excluded from the analysis. Patient characteristics such as demographics and associated comorbidities as well as perioperative and postoperative complications were collected. Outcomes of interest were operative time, estimated blood loss (EBL), length of stay (LOS), readmissions, reoperations, and any complications.

Results: A total of 107 elderly patients were identified for this study, with a median age of 73.0 years. Demographics and comorbidities in both groups were similar in both groups. Univariate analysis yielded an MIS group with significantly lower EBL (P < 0.001), operative time (P < 0.001), and LOS (P < 0.001). In multivariable analysis, EBL and LOS were found to be significantly lower in the MIS group (P = 0.02 and 0.001, respectively). Rates of complications, readmissions (no readmissions in MIS group), reoperations, and pain improvement also favored the MIS group and although they were not found to be significantly different between the 2 groups on univariate and multivariable analysis, the results trended toward significance.

Conclusions: These findings suggest that minimally invasive spine surgery in the elderly is safe and may pose a lower risk of associated perioperative and postoperative complications with faster recovery time.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.wneu.2020.11.145DOI Listing
February 2021

Anterior Cervical Osteophyte Resection for Treatment of Dysphagia.

Global Spine J 2021 May 20;11(4):488-499. Epub 2020 Mar 20.

Department of Orthopedic Surgery, 4352Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN, USA.

Study Design: This was a retrospective cohort study.

Objectives: When anterior cervical osteophytes become large enough, they may cause dysphagia. There is a paucity of work examining outcomes and complications of anterior cervical osteophyte resection for dysphagia.

Methods: Retrospective review identified 19 patients who underwent anterior cervical osteophyte resection for a diagnosis of dysphagia. The mean age was 71 years and follow-up, 4.7 years. The most common level operated on was C3-C4 (13, 69%).

Results: Following anterior cervical osteophyte resection, 79% of patients had improvement in dysphagia. Five patients underwent cervical fusion; there were no episodes of delayed or iatrogenic instability requiring fusion. Fusion patients were younger (64 vs 71 years, = .05) and had longer operative times (315 vs 121 minutes, = .01). Age of 75 years or less trended toward improvement in dysphagia ( = .09; OR = 18.8; 95% CI 0.7-478.0), whereas severe dysphagia trended toward increased complications ( = .07; OR = 11.3; 95% CI = 0.8-158.5). Body mass index, use of an exposure surgeon, diffuse idiopathic skeletal hyperostosis diagnosis, surgery at 3 or more levels, prior neck surgery, and fusion were not predictive of improvement or complication.

Conclusions: Anterior cervical osteophyte resection improves swallowing function in the majority of patients with symptomatic osteophytes. Spinal fusion can be added to address stenosis and other underlying cervical disease and help prevent osteophyte recurrence, whereas intraoperative navigation can be used to ensure complete osteophyte resection without breaching the cortex or entering the disc space. Because of the relatively high complication rate, patients should undergo thorough multidisciplinary workup with swallow evaluation to confirm that anterior cervical osteophytes are the primary cause of dysphagia prior to surgery.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/2192568220912706DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8119911PMC
May 2021

Predictors of the Best Outcomes Following Minimally Invasive Surgery for Grade 1 Degenerative Lumbar Spondylolisthesis.

Neurosurgery 2020 Jun 4. Epub 2020 Jun 4.

Department of Neurological Surgery, University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco, California.

Background: The factors driving the best outcomes following minimally invasive surgery (MIS) for grade 1 degenerative lumbar spondylolisthesis are not clearly elucidated.

Objective: To investigate the factors that drive the best 24-mo patient-reported outcomes (PRO) following MIS surgery for grade 1 degenerative lumbar spondylolisthesis.

Methods: A total of 259 patients from the Quality Outcomes Database lumbar spondylolisthesis module underwent single-level surgery for degenerative grade 1 lumbar spondylolisthesis with MIS techniques (188 fusions, 72.6%). Twenty-four-month follow-up PROs were collected and included the Oswestry disability index (ODI) change (ie, 24-mo minus baseline value), numeric rating scale (NRS) back pain change, NRS leg pain change, EuroQoL-5D (EQ-5D) questionnaire change, and North American Spine Society (NASS) satisfaction questionnaire. Multivariable models were constructed to identify predictors of PRO change.

Results: The mean age was 64.2 ± 11.5 yr and consisted of 148 (57.1%) women and 111 (42.9%) men. In multivariable analyses, employment was associated with superior postoperative ODI change (β-7.8; 95% CI [-12.9 to -2.6]; P = .003), NRS back pain change (β -1.2; 95% CI [-2.1 to -0.4]; P = .004), EQ-5D change (β 0.1; 95% CI [0.01-0.1]; P = .03), and NASS satisfaction (OR = 3.7; 95% CI [1.7-8.3]; P < .001). Increasing age was associated with superior NRS leg pain change (β -0.1; 95% CI [-0.1 to -0.01]; P = .03) and NASS satisfaction (OR = 1.05; 95% CI [1.01-1.09]; P = .02). Fusion surgeries were associated with superior ODI change (β -6.7; 95% CI [-12.7 to -0.7]; P = .03), NRS back pain change (β -1.1; 95% CI [-2.1 to -0.2]; P = .02), and NASS satisfaction (OR = 3.6; 95% CI [1.6-8.3]; P = .002).

Conclusion: Preoperative employment and surgeries, including a fusion, were predictors of superior outcomes across the domains of disease-specific disability, back pain, leg pain, quality of life, and patient satisfaction. Increasing age was predictive of superior outcomes for leg pain improvement and satisfaction.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/neuros/nyaa206DOI Listing
June 2020

A Comparison of Minimally Invasive and Open Transforaminal Lumbar Interbody Fusion for Grade 1 Degenerative Lumbar Spondylolisthesis: An Analysis of the Prospective Quality Outcomes Database.

Neurosurgery 2020 09;87(3):555-562

Department of Neurological Surgery, University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco, California.

Background: It remains unclear if minimally invasive transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (MI-TLIF) is comparable to traditional, open TLIF because of the limitations of the prior small-sample-size, single-center studies reporting comparative effectiveness.

Objective: To compare MI-TLIF to traditional, open TLIF for grade 1 degenerative lumbar spondylolisthesis in the largest study to date by sample size.

Methods: We utilized the prospective Quality Outcomes Database registry and queried patients with grade 1 degenerative lumbar spondylolisthesis who underwent single-segment surgery with MI- or open TLIF methods. Outcomes were compared 24 mo postoperatively.

Results: A total of 297 patients were included: 72 (24.2%) MI-TLIF and 225 (75.8%) open TLIF. MI-TLIF surgeries had lower mean body mass indexes (29.5 ± 5.1 vs 31.3 ± 7.0, P = .0497) and more worker's compensation cases (11.1% vs 1.3%, P < .001) but were otherwise similar. MI-TLIF had less blood loss (108.8 ± 85.6 vs 299.6 ± 242.2 mL, P < .001), longer operations (228.2 ± 111.5 vs 189.6 ± 66.5 min, P < .001), and a higher return-to-work (RTW) rate (100% vs 80%, P = .02). Both cohorts improved significantly from baseline for 24-mo Oswestry Disability Index (ODI), Numeric Rating Scale back pain (NRS-BP), NRS leg pain (NRS-LP), and Euro-Qol-5 dimension (EQ-5D) (P > .001). In multivariable adjusted analyses, MI-TLIF was associated with lower ODI (β = -4.7; 95% CI = -9.3 to -0.04; P = .048), higher EQ-5D (β = 0.06; 95% CI = 0.01-0.11; P = .02), and higher satisfaction (odds ratio for North American Spine Society [NASS] 1/2 = 3.9; 95% CI = 1.4-14.3; P = .02). Though trends favoring MI-TLIF were evident for NRS-BP (P = .06), NRS-LP (P = .07), and reoperation rate (P = .13), these results did not reach statistical significance.

Conclusion: For single-level grade 1 degenerative lumbar spondylolisthesis, MI-TLIF was associated with less disability, higher quality of life, and higher patient satisfaction compared with traditional, open TLIF. MI-TLIF was associated with higher rates of RTW, less blood loss, but longer operative times. Though we utilized multivariable adjusted analyses, these findings may be susceptible to selection bias.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/neuros/nyaa097DOI Listing
September 2020

Sexual Dysfunction: Prevalence and Prognosis in Patients Operated for Degenerative Lumbar Spondylolisthesis.

Neurosurgery 2020 08;87(2):200-210

Department of Neurological Surgery, University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco, California.

Background: There is a paucity of investigation on the impact of spondylolisthesis surgery on back pain-related sexual inactivity.

Objective: To investigate predictors of improved sex life postoperatively by utilizing the prospective Quality Outcomes Database (QOD) registry.

Methods: A total of 218 patients who underwent surgery for grade 1 degenerative lumbar spondylolisthesis were included who were sexually active. Sex life was assessed by Oswestry Disability Index item 8 at baseline and 24-mo follow-up.

Results: Mean age was 58.0 ± 11.0 yr, and 108 (49.5%) patients were women. At baseline, 178 patients (81.7%) had sex life impairment. At 24 mo, 130 patients (73.0% of the 178 impaired) had an improved sex life. Those with improved sex lives noted higher satisfaction with surgery (84.5% vs 64.6% would undergo surgery again, P = .002). In multivariate analyses, lower body mass index (BMI) was associated with improved sex life (OR = 1.14; 95% CI [1.05-1.20]; P < .001). In the younger patients (age < 57 yr), lower BMI remained the sole significant predictor of improvement (OR = 1.12; 95% CI [1.03-1.23]; P = .01). In the older patients (age ≥ 57 yr)-in addition to lower BMI (OR = 1.12; 95% CI [1.02-1.27]; P = .02)-lower American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) grades (1 or 2) (OR = 3.7; 95% CI [1.2-12.0]; P = .02) and ≥4 yr of college education (OR = 3.9; 95% CI [1.2-15.1]; P = .03) were predictive of improvement.

Conclusion: Over 80% of patients who present for surgery for degenerative lumbar spondylolisthesis report a negative effect of the disease on sex life. However, most patients (73%) report improvement postoperatively. Sex life improvement was associated with greater satisfaction with surgery. Lower BMI was predictive of improved sex life. In older patients-in addition to lower BMI-lower ASA grade and higher education were predictive of improvement.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/neuros/nyz406DOI Listing
August 2020

Periodic focal epileptiform discharges.

Clin Neurophysiol 2019 08 31;130(8):1320-1328. Epub 2019 May 31.

Department of Neurosurgery, Mayo Clinic, Jacksonville, FL, USA.

Objective: To report intraoperative periodic focal epileptiform discharges (PFEDs) during awake craniotomy using high-density electrocorticography (HD-ECoG).

Methods: We retrospectively analyzed 81 patients undergoing awake craniotomy between 9/29/2016 and 7/5/2018. Intraoperative HD-ECoG was performed with direct electrocortical stimulation (DECS) for functional brain mapping. Real-time interpretation was performed and compared to scalp EEG when performed. Perioperative seizures, surgical complications, and characteristics of PFEDs were assessed.

Results: 69/81 patients (mean age 48.5 years) underwent awake surgery; 55 operated for brain tumor, 11 for epilepsy and 3 for cavernomas. A focal abnormality on brain MRI was present in 63/69 (91.3%) patients. 43/69 (62.3%) patients had seizures preoperatively, 4/69 (5.7%) had seizures during DECS. PFEDs were identified in 11 patients (15.9%); 2 on depth recording and 9 during intraoperative HD-ECoG. 32 patients (46.3%) had preoperative EEG. HD-ECoG detected more epileptiform discharges (EDs) than standard EEG (32/43; 74.4% vs 9/32; 28.1%) (p = <0.001). Of 9/43 patients with PFEDs on HD-ECoG, 7 patients also had scalp EEG but only one case had EDs (p = 0.02), and 0/32 had periodic EDs.

Conclusions: Intraoperative PFEDs are novel, highly focal EDs approximating a single gyrus. In patients with brain tumors, PFEDs did not demonstrate a relationship to pre-operative seizures though has similarities to other common waveforms in patients with epilepsy.

Significance: PFEDs expand our understanding of the interictal-ictal continuum and highlight improved temporo-spatial information obtained from increasing sensor density during intracranial EEG recording.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.clinph.2019.04.718DOI Listing
August 2019

Impact of the H3K27M mutation on survival in pediatric high-grade glioma: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

J Neurosurg Pediatr 2018 11;23(3):308-316

2Department of Neurologic Surgery and.

OBJECTIVE Pediatric high-grade gliomas (pHGGs), including diffuse intrinsic pontine glioma, present a prognostic challenge given their lethality and rarity. A substitution mutation of lysine for methionine at position 27 in histone H3 (H3K27M) has been shown to be highly specific to these tumors. Data are accumulating regarding the poor outcomes of patients with these tumors; however, the quantification of pooled outcomes has yet to be done, which could assist in prioritizing management. The aim of this study was to quantitatively pool data in the current literature on the H3K27M mutation as an independent prognostic factor in pHGG. METHODS Searches of seven electronic databases from their inception to March 2018 were conducted according to the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) guidelines. Data were extracted and pooled using a meta-analysis of proportions. Meta-regression was used to identify potential sources of heterogeneity. RESULTS Six observational studies satisfied the selection criteria for inclusion. They reported the survival outcomes of a pooled cohort of 474 pHGG patients, with 258 (54%) and 216 (46%) patients positive and negative, respectively, for the H3K27M mutation. Overall, the presence of the mutation was independently and significantly associated with a worse prognosis (HR 3.630, p < 0.001). Overall survival was significantly shorter (by 2.300 years; p = 0.008) when the H3K27M mutation was present in pHGG. Meta-regression did not identify any study covariates of heterogeneous concern. CONCLUSIONS According to the current literature, pHGG patients positive for the H3K27M mutation are more than 3 times more susceptible to succumbing to this disease by more than 2 years, compared to patients negative for the mutation. More robust outcome data are required to improve our quantitative understanding of this pathological entity in order to assist in prioritizing clinical management. Future larger prospective studies are required to overcome inherent biases in the current literature to validate the quantitative findings of this study. ABBREVIATIONS CI = confidence interval; GRADE = Grades of Recommendation Assessment, Development and Evaluation; HR = hazard ratio; MD = mean difference; NOS = Newcastle-Ottawa Scale; OS = overall survival; pHGG = pediatric high-grade glioma; PRISMA = Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses; RE = random effects.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3171/2018.9.PEDS18419DOI Listing
November 2018

Clinical outcomes following early versus late pharmacologic thromboprophylaxis in patients with traumatic intracranial hemorrhage: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

Neurosurg Rev 2020 Jun 29;43(3):861-872. Epub 2018 Oct 29.

Division of Neurosurgery, Hamilton General Hospital, McMaster University, Hamilton, ON, Canada.

Venous thromboembolism (VTE) after traumatic brain injury (TBI) with intracranial hemorrhage (ICH) presents a serious yet manageable morbidity and mortality risk. This systematic review and meta-analysis aimed to pool the current literature to evaluate whether or not pharmacologic thromboprophylaxis (PTP) administered early after traumatic ICH significantly changes incidence of VTE or hemorrhagic progression when compared to late administration. Systematic searches of seven electronic databases from their inception to July 2018 were conducted following the appropriate guidelines. One thousand four hundred ninety articles were identified for screening. Outcomes of interest were pooled as odd ratios (ORs) and analyzed using a random-effects model. Eleven comparative studies satisfied selection criteria, yielding a total of 5036 cases. Overall, mean age was 47.6 years and 36% patients were female. PTP was administered early (≤ 72 h from admission) in 2106 (42%) patients and late (> 72 h from admission) in 2922 (58%) cases. There was no statistically significant difference in the incidence of hemorrhagic progression (OR, 0.86; P = 0.450) or all-cause mortality (OR, 0.83; P = 0.347) between the early versus late PTP patient groups. However, incidence of VTE was significantly less in the early PTP patient group (OR, 0.58; P = 0.008). The early administration of PTP after traumatic ICH does not appear to confer a worse prognosis in terms of hemorrhagic progression. However, it seems to confer superior VTE prophylaxis, when compared to late PTP administration. We suggest that early PTP should not be prematurely discounted for patients with ICH in TBI on the assumption of aggravating hemorrhagic progression alone.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10143-018-1045-yDOI Listing
June 2020

Minimally invasive percutaneous approach for the management of high grade spondylolisthesis.

J Neurosurg Sci 2018 Aug 4;62(4):521-522. Epub 2017 Sep 4.

Mayo Clinic Neuro-Informatics Laboratory, Rochester, MN, USA -

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http://dx.doi.org/10.23736/S0390-5616.17.03980-7DOI Listing
August 2018
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