Publications by authors named "Mohammad Reza Abbasian"

10 Publications

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Which Route of Tranexamic Acid Administration is More Effective to Reduce Blood Loss Following Total Knee Arthroplasty?

Arch Bone Jt Surg 2016 Jan;4(1):65-9

Akhtar Orthopedic Hospital, Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran.

Background: The most appropriate route of tranexamic acid administration is controversial. In the current study, we compared the efficacy of intravenous (IV) and topical intra-articular tranexamic acid in reducing blood loss and transfusion rate in patients who underwent primary total knee arthroplasty.

Methods: One hundred twenty 120 patients were scheduled to undergo primary total knee arthroplasty. Patients were randomly allocated to three equal groups: IV tranexamic acid (500 mg), topical tranexamic acid (3 g in 100 mL normal saline) and the control. In the topical group, half of the volume was used to irrigate the joint and the other half was injected intra-articularly. The volume of blood loss, hemoglobin (Hb) level at 24 hours postoperative, and rate of transfusion was compared between groups.

Results: The blood loss and Hb level were significantly greater and lower in the control group, respectively (P=0.031). Also, the rate of transfusion was significantly greater in the control group (P=0.013). However, IV and topical groups did not differ significantly in terms of measured variables. No patient experienced a thromboembolic event in our study.

Conclusion: Tranexamic acid is a useful antifibrinolytic drug to reduce postoperative blood loss, Hb drop, and rate of blood transfusion in patients undergoing total knee arthroplasty. The route of tranexamic acid administration did not affect the efficacy and safety.
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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4733239PMC
January 2016

Effect of Pentoxifylline Administration on an Experimental Rat Model of Femur Fracture Healing With Intramedullary Fixation.

Iran Red Crescent Med J 2015 Dec 28;17(12):e29513. Epub 2015 Dec 28.

Department of Anatomical Sciences and Biology, School of Medicine, Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, IR Iran; Cellular and Molecular Biology Research Center, School of Medicine, Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, IR Iran.

Background: Globally, musculoskeletal injuries comprise a major public health problem that contributes to a large burden of disability and suffering. Pentoxifylline (PTX) has been originally used as a hemorheologic drug to treat intermittent claudication. Previous test tube and in vivo studies reported the beneficial effects of PTX on bony tissue.

Objectives: This study aims to evaluate the effects of different dosages of PTX on biomechanical properties that occur during the late phase of the fracture healing process following a complete femoral osteotomy in a rat model. We applied intramedullary pin fixation as the treatment of choice.

Materials And Methods: This experimental study was conducted at the Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran. We used the simple random technique to divide 35 female rats into five groups. Group 1 received intraperitoneal (i.p.) PTX (50 mg/kg, once daily) injections, starting 15 days before surgery, and group 2, group 3, and group 4 received 50 mg/kg, 100 mg/kg, and 200 mg/kg i.p. PTX injections, respectively, once daily after surgery. All animals across groups received treatment for six weeks (until sacrificed). Complete surgical transverse osteotomy was performed in the right femur of all rats. At six weeks after surgery, the femurs were subjected to a three-point bending test.

Results: Daily administration of 50 mg/kg PTX (groups 1 and 2) decreased the high stress load in repairing osteotomized femurs when compared with the control group. The highest dose of PTX (200 mg/kg) significantly increased the high stress load when compared with the control group (P = 0.030), group 1 (P = 0.023), group 2 (P = 0.008), and group 3 (P = 0.010), per the LSD findings.

Conclusions: Treatment with 200 mg/kg PTX accelerated fracture healing when compared with the control group.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.5812/ircmj.29513DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4707237PMC
December 2015

Treatment of Humeral Shaft Fractures: Minimally Invasive Plate Osteosynthesis Versus Open Reduction and Internal Fixation.

Trauma Mon 2015 Aug 1;20(3):e26271. Epub 2015 Aug 1.

Orthopedics Research Center, Akhtar Hospital, Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, IR Iran.

Background: The optimal technique for operative fixation of humeral shaft fractures remains controversial and warrants research.

Objectives: The purpose of the current study was to compare the functional and clinical outcomes of conventional open reduction and internal fixation (ORIF) with minimally invasive plate osteosynthesis (MIPO) in patients with fractures in two-third distal humeral shaft.

Patients And Methods: In the current prospective case-control study, 65 patients with humeral shaft fractures were treated using ORIF (33 patients) or MIPO (32 patients). Time of surgery, time of union, incidence of varus deformity and complications were compared between the two groups. Also, the university of California-Los Angeles (UCLA) shoulder rating scale and Mayo Elbow performance score (MEPS) were used to compare the functional outcomes between the two groups.

Results: The median of union time was shorter in the MIPO group (4 months versus 5 months). The time of surgery and functional outcomes based on the UCLA and MEPS scores were the same. The incidence of varus deformity was more than 5° and was higher and the incidence of nonunion, infection and iatrogenic radial nerve injury were lower in the MIPO group; however, the differences were not significant.

Conclusions: Due to the shorter union time, to some extent less complication rate and comparable functional and clinical results, the authors recommend to use the MIPO technique in treating the mid-distal humeral shaft fracture.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.5812/traumamon.26271v2DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4630601PMC
August 2015

Arthroscopic Meniscal Repair: "Modified Outside-In Technique".

Arch Bone Jt Surg 2015 Apr;3(2):104-8

Sohrab Keyhani MD Mohammad Reza Abbasian MD Nasim Siatiri MD Ali Sarvi MD Ali Akbar Esmailiejah MD Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Akhtar Hospital, Shahid Beheshti University of medical sciences, Tehran, Iran.

Background: Despite the introduction of different techniques for meniscal repair, no single procedure is superior in all situations. The new method for meniscal repair named "modified outside-in technique" aims to achieve higher primary fixation strength by an alternative suture technique as well as avoid disadvantages of outside-in, inside-out, and all-inside suture procedures. Additionally, the mid-term results of surgically treated patients with meniscal injuries by our new technique were evaluated.

Methods: The current prospective study included 66 patients who underwent meniscal repair by the modified outside-in technique. The International Knee Documentation Committee (IKDC) Subjective Knee Evaluation Form was completed pre- and post-operatively. At final follow-up, Lysholm score was completed and patients were questioned about their return to previous sport activities. Clinical success was defined as lack of swelling and joint line tenderness, absence of locking, negative McMurray test and no need for meniscectomy. Patients' satisfaction was evaluated using the visual analogue scale (VAS). Patients were followed for 26±1.7 months.

Results: Clinical success was achieved in 61 patients (92.4%) and 5 candidates required meniscectomy (7.6%). IKDC Subjective Knee Evaluation Form score increased significantly from 54.2±12.7 preoperatively to 90.8±15.6 postoperatively (P<0.001). Lysholm score was excellent and good in 49 (80.3%) patients and fair in 12 (19.7%). Patients' satisfaction averaged at 8.35±1 (6-10). Neurovascular injury, synovitis and other knot-related complications were not reported.

Conclusions: The modified outside-in technique has satisfactory functional and clinical outcomes. We believe that this procedure is associated with better clinical and biomechanical results; however, complementary studies should be performed to draw a firm conclusion in this regard.
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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4464318PMC
April 2015

Temporary Internal Fixation for Ligamentous and Osseous Lisfranc Injuries: Outcome and Technical Tip.

Foot Ankle Int 2015 Aug 1;36(8):976-83. Epub 2015 Apr 1.

Inselspital, Orthopaedic Surgery, Berne, Switzerland

Background: Open rather than closed reduction and internal fixation as well as primary definitive arthrodesis are well accepted for ligamentous and osseous Lisfranc injuries. For ligamentous injuries, a better outcome after primary definitive partial arthrodesis has been published.

Methods: Of 135 Lisfranc injuries that were treated from 1998 to 2012 with open reduction, temporary internal fixation by screws and plates, and restricted weight bearing in a lower leg cast for 3 months followed by an arch support for another 4 to 6 weeks, 29 ligamentous Lisfranc injuries were available for follow-up. They were compared with 29 osseous Lisfranc injuries matched in age and gender.

Results: Between the groups, there were no significant differences in average age (39.9 vs 38 years) or in average follow-up time (8.3 vs 9.1 years). Also, no significant differences were seen in the AOFAS midfoot score (84 vs 85.3 points), the FFI pain scale (9.9 vs 14.9 points), SF 36 physical component (56.2 vs 53.9 points), SF 36 mental component (57 vs 56.4 points), or VAS for pain (1.6 vs 1.5 points). The FFI function scale was significantly lower in the ligamentous group (11.6 vs 19.5 points). Radiographically, loss of reduction was recorded 3 times in the ligamentous injuries and 4 times in the osseous injuries. Arthritis was mild/moderate/severe in 5/3/0 ligamentous injuries and in 7/2/1 osseous injuries, requiring 1 definitive secondary Lisfranc arthrodesis in each group.

Conclusion: With longer and conservative postoperative management, open reduction and temporary internal fixation in ligamentous and osseous Lisfranc injuries led to equal medium-term outcome. Inferior outcome in ligamentous injuries was not found.

Level Of Evidence: Level III, retrospective comparative cohort study.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/1071100715577787DOI Listing
August 2015

Modified retro-tubercle opening-wedge versus conventional high tibial osteotomy.

Orthopedics 2011 Jan 1;34(2):90. Epub 2011 Jan 1.

Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Shahid Beheshti University M.C., Tehran, Iran.

Despite the fact that common surgical techniques for the treatment of genu varum usually correct the malalignment in the affected knee, these methods have significant complications and cause problems in the long term. Retro-tubercle opening-wedge high tibial osteotomy is among the newer techniques for the treatment of genu varum. The goal of this study was to compare the results of retro-tubercle opening-wedge high tibial osteotomy with those of medial opening-wedge osteotomy. In a randomized, controlled trial, 72 patients with varus knees who were scheduled for surgery were assigned into either the retro-tubercle opening-wedge high tibial osteotomy (n=34) or medial opening-wedge osteotomy groups (n=38). Groups were matched for age and sex. The position of the patella was compared with respect to the tuberosity and the upper tibial slope pre- and postoperatively. Patients were followed for an average of 13 months (range, 10-21 months). In the retro-tubercle opening-wedge high tibial osteotomy group, the length of the patellar tendon did not significantly differ pre- and postoperatively (P≥.5); however, in the medial opening-wedge osteotomy group, a statistically significant shortening was noted in patellar tendon postoperatively (P≤.05). Similarly, the tibial plateau inclination showed a statistically significant difference postoperatively in the medial opening-wedge osteotomy group, while the difference in the retro-tubercle opening-wedge high tibial osteotomy group did not reach statistical significance.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3928/01477447-20101221-09DOI Listing
January 2011

Clinical results of reversed V-shaped high tibial corticotomy with minimally invasive surgery without internal fixation devices.

Orthopedics 2010 Jun 9;33(6):388. Epub 2010 Jun 9.

Akhtar Orthopaedic Hospital, Shahid Beheshti Medical University, Tehran, Iran.

High tibial osteotomy is a method of treating knee osteoarthritis due to genu varum in advanced stages. High tibial osteotomy-associated problems continue to be reported. The purpose of this study was to investigate the clinical results of a new, innovative method of high tibial osteotomy with 3- to 13-year follow-up. Between 1996 and 2006, our new surgical method was performed on 293 patients with medial compartment osteoarthritis and genu varum. All patients were examined preoperatively, 6 months postoperatively, and at final follow-up. The Hospital for Special Surgery Knee Scoring System (HSS) was used at final follow-up, and limb alignment and patient satisfaction were reassessed. Immediate postoperative complications included varus recurrence, knee instability, and peroneal nerve palsy, and no signs of tibial nonunion or infection were observed. At final follow-up, 3 cases of genu recurvatum, 2 cases of peroneal nerve palsy, and 25 cases of loss of correction were observed. Average postoperative HSS score was 85 (range, 47-97), and 97.8% of the patients were satisfied. This new method is a good alternative for the correction of genu varum because it requires a small incision, is soft tissue friendly, is a corticotomy instead of an osteotomy, requires no internal or external fixation devices, has a shorter duration and an acceptable complication and recurrence rate, and results in satisfactory HSS scores and higher patient satisfaction rates.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3928/01477447-20100429-12DOI Listing
June 2010

Congenital dislocation of the knee in a 16-year-old girl.

Orthopedics 2010 May 12;33(5). Epub 2010 May 12.

Akhtar Orthopaedic Research Center, Akhtar Orthopaedic Hospital,Tehran, Iran.

Congenital dislocation of the knee ranges from hyperextension of the knee to translation of the femur on the tibia. Treatment options include bracing, splinting, manipulation and casting, and surgery. A 16-year-old girl presented with an inability to walk, stand upright, or bend her knees. She exhibited deformity of both lower extremities. She had deformed knees from birth, and they had been put in a cast for 2 months. No other therapeutic measures were taken. The patient walked on her abnormally hyperextended knees and could hyperextend the knees to 150 degrees recurvatum. She was diagnosed with a grade III congenital dislocation of the knee, and a flexion-shortening osteotomy at the distal femur above the trochlear level was performed on her knees in 2 sessions. Postoperatively, range of motion changed from hyperextention to 80 degrees flexion. A femoral supracondylar osteotomy was also performed 2 years later, and as a result, a 15 degrees flexion and 15 degrees valgus were added to the limb. The patient is now able to stand and walk without a knee brace and has 90 degrees passive and 80 degrees active knee flexion on both sides. Congenital dislocation of the knee is a rare congenital disorder. The results of treatment are favorable if started before age 3 months, or sometimes before age 2 years, but there is no effective treatment for older, neglected cases; therefore, we believe this case report demonstrates a novel surgical approach.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3928/01477447-20100329-22DOI Listing
May 2010

Association of rosacea with demodicosis.

Arch Iran Med 2007 Apr;10(2):199-203

Skin Research Center, Department of Dermatology, Shaheed Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran.

Background: There are controversial reports about the role of Demodex mites in pathogenesis of acne rosacea. The aim of this study was to examine the relationship between the presence and number of Demodex mites and the pathogenesis of rosacea.

Methods: In this case-control study, the prevalence of Demodex mites was studied in facial biopsy of 75 patients with acne rosacea as case group, and in 75 patients with discoid lupus erythematosus and 75 patients with actinic lichen planus as control groups.

Results: The prevalence of Demodex mites in patients with acne rosacea (38.6%) was significantly higher than the patients with discoid lupus erythematosus (21.3%) and actinic lichen planus patients (10.6%) (P < 0.001).

Conclusion: This study suggests that Demodex mites may play a role in pathogenesis of rosacea but it is not clear whether rosacea merely provides a suitable environment for multiplication of mites, or whether the mites play a role in the pathological changes.
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http://dx.doi.org/07102/AIM.0014DOI Listing
April 2007

Tumor lysis syndrome in children with non-Hodgkin lymphoma.

Pediatr Hematol Oncol 2006 Jan-Feb;23(1):65-70

Department of Hematology and Oncology, Mofid Children Hospital, Shahid Beheshti Medical University, Tehran, Iran.

This study was designed to evaluate the incidence of tumor lysis syndrome (TLS) among children with non-Hodgkin lymphoma and to define whether renal involvement can be associated with higher incidence of TLS after chemotherapy. Medical charts of 59 patients were reviewed. TLS was diagnosed using laboratory and clinical criteria. Renal involvement was diagnosed based on ultrasound and CT scan findings. Laboratory TLS occurred in 7 patients (11.85%) and clinical TLS was observed in 7 patients (11.85%) as well. In 5 out of 14 TLS patients, hemodialysis was required to correct electrolyte abnormalities and TLS related death was reported overall in 3 patients. Sex, age, pretreatment LDH, and initial WBC count were not associated with higher incidence of TLS after chemotherapy, but a significant correlation was found between pretreatment renal involvement at imaging studies and development of TLS after chemotherapy (p = .027). The results indicate that despite all preventive measures, tumor lysis syndrome still occurs in children with non-Hodgkin lymphoma following chemotherapy. Patients who have evidence of renal involvement at imaging studies are more likely to develop TLS after chemotherapy.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/08880010500313561DOI Listing
July 2006