Publications by authors named "Mohammad Mohsenzadeh"

8 Publications

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Chemical composition, antioxidative‎, antibacterial‎‎, and time-kill activities of some selected plant essential oils against foodborne pathogenic and spoilage organisms.

Vet Res Forum 2020 15;11(4):339-346. Epub 2020 Dec 15.

Department of Food Hygiene and Aquaculture, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Ferdowsi University of Mashhad, Mashhad, Iran.

Essential oils (EOs) have been utilized as a growth inhibitor of microorganisms. This study was aimed to recognize the composition, antioxidative‎, antibacterial‎‎‎‎‎‎‎‎, and time-kill activities of , , ; and EOs against O157:H7, and . Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry was used to determine the chemical composition of EOs. Disc diffusion, minimum inhibitory concentration, minimum bactericidal concentration, and time-kill methods were used to determine the antibacterial ‎‎activity of EOs. The antioxidative ‎ activity of EOs were determined by 2, 20-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl radical scavenging and ferric reducing antioxidative ‎ power methods. All EOs exhibited antibacterial ‎‎activity, however, EO was the most effective followed by EO The lowest antibacterial‎‎‎‎‎ activity was observed in EO. The most sensitive among tested bacteria to and EOs was O157:H7 and to ; and EOs were and , respectively and EOs were able to kill 85.00% and 80.00% of the O157: H7 and cells in 4 hr, respectively. The highest antioxidative ‎activity was observed in EO. The tested EOs showed the highest antioxidative ‎activity at a concentration of 2.00 g L. Ferric reducing antioxidant power value of , and was 2.01 ± 0.03, 1.47 ± 0.04, 1.01 ± 0.03, and 0.66 ± 0.34, respectively. High concentrations of tested EOs showed a decrease in antioxidative ‎ activity.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.30466/vrf.2018.91902.2223DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7904113PMC
December 2020

Ribose-induced Maillard Reaction as an Analytical Method for Detection of Adulteration and Differentiation of Chilled and Frozen-thawed Minced Veal.

Food Sci Anim Resour 2020 Apr 30;40(3):350-361. Epub 2020 Apr 30.

Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Basic Sciences, Ferdowsi University of Mashhad, Mashhad, Iran.

Quality control of meat products is one of the main concerns of consumers, governmental control authorities, and retailers. The purpose of this study was to employ ribose-induced Maillard reaction in detection of meat adulteration and differentiation of fresh-chilled from frozen-thawed minced veal. The browning intensity was assessed through measuring the absorbance at 420 nm with a spectrophotometer as well as the direct analysis of the color and pH. The results showed that CIE b*, CIE a*, and A values in the extract of fresh-chilled veal were significantly (p<0.05) higher than frozen-thawed samples. The extract of frozen meat samples stored at -18°C became significantly darker and more yellowish compared to -4°C. The results showed that the A value in the frozen-thawed veal stored at -4°C and -18°C was reduced by approximately 17.22±3.53% and 11.68±2.49%, respectively, compared with fresh-chilled veal. The findings also showed that the storage temperature of minced veal and the heating time in this reaction had a significant effect on all tested variables (p<0.0001). The proposed method can be considered as an easy, quick, and inexpensive test for differentiating between the fresh-chilled and frozen-thawed minced veal.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.5851/kosfa.2020.e13DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7207089PMC
April 2020

Copper, Iron, Manganese, Zinc, Cobalt, Arsenic, Cadmium, Chrome, and Lead Concentrations in Liver and Muscle in Iranian Camel (Camelus dromedarius).

Biol Trace Elem Res 2020 Apr 29;194(2):390-400. Epub 2019 Jun 29.

Department of Food Hygiene and Aquaculture, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Ferdowsi University of Mashhad, Mashhad, Iran.

Camel meat as healthy food has received much attention for human consumption. In the present study, liver and muscle from 60 camels (Camelus dromedarius) including 26 males and 34 females were sampled to determine the concentration of As, Cd, Pb, Cr, Cu, Fe, Mn, Zn, and Co using the inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES). Based on the obtained results, the average content of essential or toxic elements in the liver and muscle was as follows: 111.2 ± 26.51, 38.57 ± 7.97 (Zn), 3.28 ± 0.79, 2.12 ± 0.49 (Cu), 76.98 ± 14.20, 59.34 ± 11.81 (Fe), 0.87 ± 0.22, 0.48 ± 0.12 (Mn), 0.52 ± 0.27, 0.03 ± 0.01 (Co), ND ± 0.008, 0.012 ± 0.008 (Cd), 7.06 ± 1.58, 3.90 ± 0.86 (Cr), 0.85 ± 0.043, and 0.18 ± 0.02, and 1.12 ± 0.21 (As) mg kg. Pb concentration was lower than the detection limit (ND). The results showed that the liver concentrations of Cu, Zn, Fe, Mn, Co, and Cr were significantly higher than those in the muscle. The association of sex, age, region, and sampling period, with a concentration of these elements, revealed that concentration of zinc in the liver and cobalt in the muscle were significantly higher in the male. Also, significantly higher cobalt and zinc concentrations in muscle were seen in the first 6 months of the year. Age-related differences in muscle concentrations were observed for cobalt. The concentration of trace elements and heavy metals in the liver and muscle samples were not correlated. Comparison of heavy metals concentration in both tissues with European Commission regulation showed that except Cd, the other heavy metals had a higher level than the EU standard. The results of this study showed that camel meat can be contaminated with heavy metals, but more investigations are needed.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s12011-019-01788-2DOI Listing
April 2020

Optical and electrochemical aptasensors for the detection of amphenicols.

Biosens Bioelectron 2018 Oct 25;118:137-152. Epub 2018 Jul 25.

Pharmaceutical Research Center, Pharmaceutical Technology Institute, Mashhad University of Medical Sciences, Mashhad, Iran. Electronic address:

Various methods have been introduced to detect amphenicols in biological samples. However, because of some problems involved in conventional methods, such as time-consuming processes, expensive equipment, and high consumption of reagents, novel strategies for the detection and quantitative determination of amphenicols are required. Aptamer-based biosensors with unique recognition features have gained much attention because of their rapid response, high specificity, and simple fabrication. In this study, we summarized the optical and electrochemical amphenicol aptasensors with a focus on the recent advancements and modern approaches in amphenicol aptasensors to provide readers with an inclusive understanding of their improvement.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.bios.2018.07.045DOI Listing
October 2018

Development and characterization of DNA aptamers against florfenicol: Fabrication of a sensitive fluorescent aptasensor for specific detection of florfenicol in milk.

Talanta 2018 May 1;182:193-201. Epub 2018 Feb 1.

Pharmaceutical Research Center, Pharmaceutical Technology Institute, Mashhad University of Medical Sciences, Mashhad, Iran; Department of Pharmaceutical Biotechnology, School of Pharmacy, Mashhad University of Medical Sciences, Mashhad, Iran. Electronic address:

Specific ssDNA aptamers for the antibiotic florfenicol (FF) were developed from an enriched nucleotide library using magnetic beads-based SELEX (Systematic Evolution of Ligands by EXponential enrichment) technique with high-binding affinity. After 12 rounds of selection, thirty-six sequences were obtained that were then divided into five major families, according to the primary sequence similarity. Binding affinity analyses of three fluorescently tagged aptamers belonging to different families demonstrated that the dissociation constants (K) were in the low nanomolar range (K = 52.78-211.4 nmol L). Furthermore, to verify the potential application of the aptamers, a fluorescent aptasensor was fabricated for detecting the FF residue in raw milk samples based on the energy transfer between graphene oxide as the acceptor and fluorescently tagged FF-specific aptamer as the donor. Under optimal conditions, the aptasensor displayed a wide linear range from 5 to 1200 nmol L and a detection limit of 5.75 nmol L with excellent selectivity in milk. The recovery rate in the milk was between 101% ± 0.14% and 110% ± 2.8%, indicating high accuracy. This fluorescent aptasensor possessed considerable potential for rapid analysis of FF in raw milk because of its simplicity of detection. Moreover, the interaction between the aptamer and FF was studied using molecular modeling.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.talanta.2018.01.083DOI Listing
May 2018

Characterization of a novel biodegradable edible film obtained from Dracocephalum moldavica seed mucilage.

Int J Biol Macromol 2018 Mar 2;108:874-883. Epub 2017 Nov 2.

Department of Food Hygiene and Aquaculture, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Ferdowsi University of Mashhad (FUM), P.O. Box 9177948974, Mashhad, Iran.

This study investigated the feasibility of using Dracocephalum moldavica seed mucilage (DMSM) as a novel film-forming material. The chemical composition and functional group of the dried DMSM were determined. The DMSM films were prepared using three levels of glycerol (10-40%, w/w). The thermal, micro-structural, barrier, physical, and mechanical properties of the films and their antioxidant activity were examined as a function of the glycerol concentration. As the concentration increased, the films' water vapour permeability, elongation at break (%EB), water solubility, and moisture content significantly increased. But the tensile strength, surface hydrophobicity, melting point, and glass transition point (T) decreased significantly. The films became slightly greenish or yellowish in colour but still looked transparent All the DMSM films displayed remarkable antioxidant activities. The electron micrographs showed that the plasticized films had a uniform surface without any obvious cracks or pores. The results of the present study suggest that DMSM as a novel antioxidant edible film with interesting specifications can be used to package several food products.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ijbiomac.2017.10.184DOI Listing
March 2018

Frequency of specific agr groups and antibiotic resistance in Staphylococcus aureus isolated from bovine mastitis in the northeast of Iran.

Vet Res Forum 2015 15;6(4):295-9. Epub 2015 Dec 15.

Department of Pathobiology, School of Medicine, North Khorasan University of Medical Sciences, Boujnord, Iran.

Staphylococcus aureus is generally regarded as a leading cause of mastitis in dairy cattle. The aim of this study was to investigate the pattern of agr groups and any possible relationship between agr groups and antibiotic resistance among S. aureus strains isolated from bovine mastitis in Northeast of Iran. For this purpose, a total of 300 bovine mastitic milk samples were taken from dairy industry farms of Khorasan Razavi Province, Iran. S. aureus were isolated and identified according to the standard methods. Antibiotic susceptibility testing was conducted by disk diffusion method. In this study a total of 31 isolates of S. aureus were evaluated for agrD gene polymorphism by specific primers. Most of the isolates belonged to agr group I (54.8%), followed by agr group III (25.8%) and agr group II (19.4%). There was not any isolates belonging to group IV. Resistance to methicillin in agr group I isolates was more than other groups. Agr groups II and III were quite susceptible to methicillin. Due to high prevalent of S. aureus isolates and high antibiotic resistance rate in bovine mastitic isolates, it is important to verify the characteristics of S. aureus strains in Iran.
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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4769334PMC
March 2016

Evaluation of antibacterial activity of selected Iranian essential oils against Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli in nutrient broth medium.

Pak J Biol Sci 2007 Oct;10(20):3693-7

Department of Food Hygiene and Public Health, Ferdowsi University of Mashhad, P.O. Box 91775-1793, Mashhad, Iran.

The antibacterial effect of different concentrations (0.01 to 15%) of thyme (Thymus vulgaris), peppermint (Mentha piperita L.) caraway seed (Carum carvi), fennel (Foeniculum vulgar), tarragon (Artmesia dracunculus) and pennyroyal (Mentha pullegium) essential oils on the Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli was studied in nutrient broth medium. The MIC values of peppermint, fennel, thyme, pennyroyal and caraway essential oils against Escherichia coli were 0.5 +/- 0.03, 1 +/- 0.03, 0.3 +/- 0.01, 0.7 +/- 0.03 and 0.6 +/- 0.02% and in contrast, for Staphylococcus aureus were 0.4 +/- 0.01, 2 +/- 0.13, 0.1 +/- 0.01, 0.5 +/- 0.02 and 0.5 +/- 0.02%, respectively. The MBC values of peppermint, fennel, thyme, pennyroyal and caraway essential oils for Escherichia coli were 0.7 +/- 0.02, 2 +/- 0.05, 0.5 +/- 0.02, 1 +/- 0.02 and 0.8 +/- 0.02 and for Staphylococcus aureus were 0.5 +/- 0.02, 4 +/- 0.26, 0.3 +/- 0.02, 0.7 +/- 0.02 and 0.6 +/- 0.01, respectively. Statistical evaluation of the results indicated that the essential oils of thyme (Thymus vulgaris) showed the broadest spectrum of action (p < 0.05). Essential oils of peppermint (Mentha piperita), caraway seed (Carum carvi), pennyroyal (Menthae pullegium) and fennel (Foeniculum vulgar) had moderate effect against tested microorganisms and in contrast, tarragon essential oil were less effective against tested microorganisms. In conclusion, essential oils of edible plants could be a potential source for inhibitory substances for some foodborne pathogens. Natural substances that extracted from plants have applications in controlling pathogens in foods.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3923/pjbs.2007.3693.3697DOI Listing
October 2007