Prof. Dr. Mohamed Sabry Medan, Ph D - Suez Canal University

Prof. Dr. Mohamed Sabry Medan

Ph D

Suez Canal University

Ismailia | Egypt

Prof. Dr. Mohamed Sabry Medan, Ph D - Suez Canal University

Prof. Dr. Mohamed Sabry Medan

Ph D

Introduction

Primary Affiliation: Suez Canal University - Ismailia , Egypt

Research Interests:


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Publications

39Publications

469Reads

1Profile Views

66PubMed Central Citations

Changes in serum cortisol level during pregnancy in ewes under field condition and the effect of fetal number.

SCVMJ, XX(1): 117-133.

SCVMJ

This study was carried out to monitor serum cortisol level in pregnant ewes and comparing it with the non-pregnant values under field condition. Also, cortisol levels were monitored in single-fetus bearing and twin-fetus bearing ewes. This study was carried out during the breeding season on 31 pregnant and 5 non-pregnant ewes. Pregnancy and fetal numbers were determined through trans rectal ultrasonography. Blood samples were collected every two weeks starting at day 30 of pregnancy until day 135 of pregnancy. Blood samples were collected in parallel from non-pregnant ewes as a control group. Cortisol was measured using ELISA. The results showed that serum cortisol levels increased gradually in pregnant ewes until day 90 of pregnancy reaching the highest level at day 135. Serum cortisol level was 4.26 ± 0.16 ng/ml at day 135 of pregnancy, while its level in non-pregnant ewes was 1.85 ± 0.15 ng/ml. Cortisol level was little bit higher in primiparous than pluriparous ewes, however, the difference was not significant. Regarding the effect of fetal number on cortisol level, twin-fetus bearing primiparous ewes had the significantly highest level. In addition, twin-fetus pulriparous ewes had a higher cortisol level than single-fetus bearing ewes. In conclusion, cortisol level increased gradually during pregnancy until day 90 reaching the highest level at day 135 of pregnancy. In addition, cortisol level was significantly higher in twin-fetus bearing ewes than single-fetus bearing ewes. This indicates that twinning increases stress on the pregnant ewes specially in primipara which need more care and attention. (Suez Canal Vet. Med. Journal, 2015; XX(1): 117-133) .

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January 2015
16 Reads

Treatment of Ovarian Inactivity in Mares During the Breeding Season with PMSG/hCG, PMSG or GnRH and the Effect of Treatment on Estradiol and Progesterone Concentrations

American Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences 2014, 9 (4): 211-216

American Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences

The objective of the present study was to treat ovarian inactivity in mares during the breeding season by using three protocols. Mares (n = 52) kept under field condition in the Green Mountain area, north of Libya were examined transrectally by ultrasound during the breeding season. They were assigned to have inactive ovaries which was confirmed by measuring serum estradiol and progesterone concentrations. Mares were treated with either PMSG/hCG (n = 32), PMSG alone (n = 10) or GnRH (n = 10). Estrus was detected by stallions and mares in estrus were allowed to be mated two times 2 days apart and examined for pregnancy by ultrasound one month later. The results showed that in the PMSG/hCG group, 19 (59.4%) mares out of 32 exhibited estrus, while 6 (60%) and 5 (50%) mares out of 10 exhibited estrus in PMSG and GnRH groups, respectively. Also the results showed that 16 mares (50.0%) ovulated in PMSG/hCG group compared with 4 mares (40.0%) in GnRH group. However, there was no ovulation in PMSG group. Conception rate was 37.0 and 30.0% in PMSG/hCG and GnRH groups, respectively. Hormonal analysis showed that estradiol and progesterone concentrations were basal at start of treatment. Thereafter, estradiol concentration increased dramatically during estrus in all treated groups. Moreover, progesterone concentration increased 10 days post-mating in PMSG/hCG and GnRH groups while still low in PMSG group. Finally, we conclude that PMSG/hCG and GnRH can be used to treat ovarian inactivity in mares and induce follicular growth and ovulation. On the other hand, we cannot recommend PMSG alone to treat ovarian inactivity in mares.

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November 2014
9 Reads

Changes in circulatory FSH of Barbari goats following treatment with high molecular weight inhibin isolated from buffalo follicular fluid.

Res Vet Sci 2013 Oct 17;95(2):374-80. Epub 2013 Apr 17.

Division of Biochemistry and Food Science, Indian Veterinary Research Institute, Izatnagar, Bareilly, UP 243122, India.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.rvsc.2013.03.013DOI Listing
October 2013
23 Reads
3 Citations
1.410 Impact Factor

Effects of vitamin E and selenium complex on heat-stressed rabbits

SCVMJ. 2012, 17(2): 129-138

SCVMJ

The effects of vitamin E & selenium were evaluated on 27 heat-stressed New Zealand white rabbits. After induction of heat stress, rabbits were randomly divided into 3 groups (9 rabbits of each). The first group (control group) did not receive any supplementation of vitamin E or selenium. The second group was injected subcutaneously with 0.2 ml (5.05 mg) vitamin E & selenium per animal weekly. The third group was injected subcutaneously with 0.4 ml (10.10 mg) vitamin E & selenium per animal weekly. Heat stress was induced through exposure of all groups to a temperature of 35 °C daily for 6 hours and continued for 35 days. Rectal and skin temperatures were recorded 1 hour before and at the end of heat stress. Blood samples were collected from the ear vein into heparinized vacutainer tubes and plasma was separated for estimation of glucose, urea, cholesterol, calcium, phosphorus, potassium, sodium, albumin and globulin. The rectal and skin temperatures increased significantly (P<0.05) after induction of heat stress. The results showed that supplementation of vitamin E & selenium complex decreased both rectal and skin temperatures in heat-stressed rabbits. Plasma glucose and cholesterol were significantly higher in all treated groups compared to control group. Regarding the effect of vitamin E & selenium dose, there was no significant difference between the two treated groups. From these results we can conclude that vitamin E & selenium complex could be used to alleviate the adverse effects of heat stress in rabbits.

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June 2012
13 Reads

Comparative changes in the serum concentrations of inhibin-B, prolactin, gonadotropins and steroid hormones at different reproductive States in domestic Turkey hens.

J Reprod Dev 2009 Oct 14;55(5):523-8. Epub 2009 Jul 14.

Animal Production Department, Faculty of Agriculture, Suez Canal University, Ismailia, Egypt.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1262/jrd.20137DOI Listing
October 2009
20 Reads
1 Citation
1.515 Impact Factor

Survival and fertility rate of cooled dromedary camel spermatozoa supplemented with catalase enzyme.

J Reprod Dev 2008 Feb 18;54(1):84-9. Epub 2007 Dec 18.

Department of Theriogenology, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Suez Canal University, Ismailia, Egypt.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1262/jrd.19124DOI Listing
February 2008
49 Reads
1 Citation
1.515 Impact Factor

Effects of bilateral efferent duct ligation on sperm motility and secretion of FSH, LH, inhibin, and testosterone in adult male rats.

Endocrine 2006 Oct;30(2):151-60

Department of Basic Veterinary Science, The United Graduate School of Veterinary Sciences, Gifu University, Gifu, Japan.

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http://link.springer.com/content/pdf/10.1385/ENDO:30:2:151.p
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1385/ENDO:30:2:151DOI Listing
October 2006
12 Reads
3.530 Impact Factor

Effect of echo-guided high-intensity focused ultrasound ablation on localized experimental tumors.

J Vet Med Sci 2006 Oct;68(10):1069-74

Central Research Laboratory, Hitachi, Ltd., Tokyo, Japan.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1292/jvms.68.1069DOI Listing
October 2006
11 Reads
1 Citation
0.782 Impact Factor

Seasonal changes in immunolocalization of inhibin/activin subunits and testicular activity in wild male raccoon dogs (Nyctereutes procyonoides).

J Reprod Dev 2006 Aug 12;52(4):503-10. Epub 2006 May 12.

Faculty of Biological Science and Technology, Beijing Forestry University, China.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1262/jrd.18011DOI Listing
August 2006
10 Reads
1 Citation
1.515 Impact Factor

Immunization of goats against inhibin increased follicular development and ovulation rate.

J Reprod Dev 2006 Aug 7;52(4):543-50. Epub 2006 Jun 7.

Central Research Laboratory, Hitachi, Ltd, Tokyo, Japan.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1262/jrd.18028DOI Listing
August 2006
6 Reads
4 Citations
1.515 Impact Factor

Effects of experimental cryptorchidism on sperm motility and testicular endocrinology in adult male rats.

J Reprod Dev 2006 Apr 16;52(2):219-28. Epub 2006 Jan 16.

Department of Basic Veterinary Science, The United Graduate School of Veterinary Sciences, Gifu University, Japan.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1262/jrd.17073DOI Listing
April 2006
29 Reads
3 Citations
1.515 Impact Factor

Changes in serum inhibin levels and immunolocalization of inhibin/activin subunits during the breeding season in the wild male Japanese black bear (Ursus thibetanus japonicus).

Endocrine 2006 Apr;29(2):345-50

Faculty of Biological Science and Technology, Beijing Forestry University, Beijing 100083, China.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1385/ENDO:29:2:345DOI Listing
April 2006
13 Reads
2 Citations
3.530 Impact Factor

Effect of active immunization against inhibin on hormonal concentrations and semen characteristics in Shiba bucks.

Theriogenology 2006 Mar 15;65(4):691-702. Epub 2005 Jul 15.

Laboratory of Veterinary Physiology, Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology, Tokyo 183-8509, Japan.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.theriogenology.2005.06.007DOI Listing
March 2006
5 Reads
1.800 Impact Factor

The effect of active immunization against inhibin on gonadotropin secretions and follicular dynamics during the estrous cycle in cows.

J Reprod Dev 2006 Feb 18;52(1):107-13. Epub 2005 Nov 18.

Laboratory of Veterinary Physiology, Department of Veterinary Medicine, Faculty of Agriculture, Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology, Fuchu, Tokyo, Japan.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1262/jrd.17064DOI Listing
February 2006
14 Reads
2 Citations
1.515 Impact Factor

Secretion of inhibin and testicular expression of inhibin subunits in male duck embryos and newly hatched ducks.

Endocrine 2005 Nov;28(2):171-9

Division of Endocrinology and Metabolism, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, Little Rock, 72205-7199, USA.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1385/ENDO:28:2:171DOI Listing
November 2005
14 Reads
3.530 Impact Factor

Induction of superovulation by immunoneutralization of endogenous inhibin in immature rats.

J Reprod Dev 2005 Oct 21;51(5):559-66. Epub 2005 Jul 21.

Laboratory of Veterinary Physiology, Faculty of Agriculture, Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology, Japan.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1262/jrd.17020DOI Listing
October 2005
37 Reads
2 Citations
1.515 Impact Factor

Immunolocalization of steroidogenic enzymes in the fetal, neonatal and adult testis of the Shiba goat.

Exp Anim 2005 Oct;54(5):451-4

Faculty of Biological Science and Technology, Beijing Forestry University, Beijing, China.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1538/expanim.54.451DOI Listing
October 2005
9 Reads
4 Citations

Developmental changes of plasma inhibin, gonadotropins, steroid hormones, and thyroid hormones in male and female Shao ducks.

Gen Comp Endocrinol 2005 Sep 8;143(2):161-7. Epub 2005 Apr 8.

Division of Endocrinology and Metabolism, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, Little Rock, AR 72205-7199, USA.

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http://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S001664800500071
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ygcen.2005.03.001DOI Listing
September 2005
20 Reads
1 Citation
2.470 Impact Factor

Follicular and hormonal dynamics during the estrous cycle in goats.

J Reprod Dev 2005 Aug;51(4):455-63

Laboratory of Veterinary Physiology, Department of Veterinary Medicine, Faculty of Agriculture, Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology, Japan.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1262/jrd.17017DOI Listing
August 2005
10 Reads
1.515 Impact Factor

Immunolocalization of inhibin/activin subunits in the shiba goat fetal, neonatal, and adult testes.

J Reprod Dev 2005 Aug;51(4):521-6

Faculty of Biological Science and Technology, Beijing Forestry University, China.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1262/jrd.17007DOI Listing
August 2005
8 Reads
2 Citations
1.515 Impact Factor

Immunolocalization of steroidogenic enzymes P450scc, 3betaHSD, P450c17, and P450arom in Göttingen miniature pig testes.

J Reprod Dev 2005 Jun 22;51(3):299-304. Epub 2005 Feb 22.

Faculty of Biological Science and Technology, Beijing Forestry University, China.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1262/jrd.16077DOI Listing
June 2005
22 Reads
5 Citations
1.515 Impact Factor

Immunolocalization of nerve growth factor (NGF) and its receptors (TrkA and p75LNGFR) in the reproductive organs of Shiba goats.

J Reprod Dev 2005 Jun 28;51(3):399-404. Epub 2005 Feb 28.

Department of Basic Veterinary Science, The United Graduate School of Veterinary Sciences, Gifu University, Japan.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1262/jrd.16082DOI Listing
June 2005
12 Reads
2 Citations
1.515 Impact Factor

Active immunization against inhibin improves superovulatory response to exogenous FSH in cattle.

J Reprod Dev 2005 Jun 11;51(3):341-6. Epub 2005 Mar 11.

Embryo Transfer Center, Hokkaido, Japan.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1262/jrd.16055DOI Listing
June 2005
8 Reads
4 Citations
1.515 Impact Factor

Secretion of leptin throughout pregnancy and early postpartum period in Japanese monkeys: placenta as another potential source of leptin.

Endocrine 2005 Jun;27(1):75-81

Laboratory of Veterinary Physiology, Department of Veterinary Medicine, Faculty of Agriculture, Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology, Tokyo, Japan.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1385/ENDO:27:1:075DOI Listing
June 2005
12 Reads
3 Citations
3.530 Impact Factor

Plasma concentrations of immunoreactive (ir)-inhibin, gonadotropins and steroid hormones during the ovulatory cycle of the duck.

J Reprod Dev 2005 Jun 11;51(3):353-8. Epub 2005 Mar 11.

Division of Endocrinology and Metabolism, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, Little Rock 72205-7199, USA.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1262/jrd.16093DOI Listing
June 2005
17 Reads
1.515 Impact Factor

Immunolocalization of steroidogenic enzymes in the corpus luteum and placenta of the Japanese Shiba goat.

J Reprod Dev 2005 Apr 7;51(2):247-52. Epub 2005 Feb 7.

Faculty of Biological Science and Technology, BeiJing Forestry University, China.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1262/jrd.16081DOI Listing
April 2005
16 Reads
4 Citations
1.515 Impact Factor

Passive immunoneutralization of endogenous inhibin increases ovulation rate in miniature Shiba goats.

J Reprod Dev 2004 Dec;50(6):705-10

Laboratory of Veterinary Physiology, Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology, Tokyo 183-8509, Japan.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1262/jrd.50.705DOI Listing
December 2004
5 Reads
1.515 Impact Factor

Effects of re-immunization of heifers against inhibin on hormonal profiles and ovulation rate.

Reproduction 2004 Oct;128(4):475-82

Laboratory of Veterinary Physiology, Department of Veterinary Medicine, Faculty of Agriculture, Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology, Tokyo 183-8509, Japan.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1530/rep.1.00232DOI Listing
October 2004
6 Reads
2 Citations
3.174 Impact Factor

Plasma concentrations of ir-inhibin, inhibin A, inhibin pro-alphaC, FSH, and estradiol-17beta during estrous cycle in mares and their relationship with follicular growth.

Endocrine 2004 Oct;25(1):7-14

Labortory of Veterinary Physiology, Department of Veterinary Medicine, Faculty of Agriculture, Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology, Tokyo 183-8509, Japan.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1385/ENDO:25:1:07DOI Listing
October 2004
13 Reads
7 Citations
3.530 Impact Factor

Transrectal ultrasonic diagnosis of ovarian follicular cysts in goats and treatment with GnRH.

Domest Anim Endocrinol 2004 Aug;27(2):115-24

Laboratory of Veterinary Physiology, Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology, 3-5-8 Saiwai-cho, Fuchu, 183-8509, Japan.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.domaniend.2004.03.006DOI Listing
August 2004
9 Reads
1 Citation
2.171 Impact Factor

Immunization against endogenous inhibin increases normal oocyte/embryo production in adult mice.

Endocrine 2004 Jul;24(2):115-9

Laboratory of Veterinary Physiology, Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology, Tokyo 183-8509, Japan.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1385/ENDO:24:2:115DOI Listing
July 2004
15 Reads
3 Citations
3.530 Impact Factor

A new alternative method for superovulation using passive immunization against inhibin in adult rats.

Biol Reprod 2004 Jul 17;71(1):236-43. Epub 2004 Mar 17.

Biol. Reprod.

The present study was undertaken to investigate the effects of passive immunoneutralization of endogenous inhibin on ovulation rate and embryo development in vivo and in vitro to establish a new alternative superovulation method in the adult rat. Female adult rats of Wistar strain were superovulated with a single injection of inhibin antiserum (inhibin-AS; 100 or 400 microl) or an injection of 20 IU eCG followed by an injection of 10 IU hCG. Untreated animals served as controls. Embryos were collected from oviducts or uteri on Days 1-5 of pregnancy, and the number of embryos and implantation sites were observed. On Day 1 of pregnancy, the two-cell-stage embryos were cultured and embryos from the 100-microl inhibin-AS group and the control group were transferred to recipient females to determine developmental competence. There were no significant differences between groups in fertilization rate. The numbers of normal embryos in the inhibin-AS-treated groups were significantly higher than the control and the eCG-hCG-treated groups throughout Days 1-4 of pregnancy. The number of implantation sites observed on Day 5 of pregnancy in the inhibin-AS-treated groups was significantly higher than both the control and the eCG-hCG-treated groups. Furthermore, the rate of blastocyst development in vitro in the inhibin-AS-treated groups and posttransfer viability in the 100-microl-inhibin-AS group were comparable with those of the control group. These results indicate that immunoneutralization of endogenous inhibin is a new practical alternative for induction of superovulation as a substitution for eCG-hCG method in the adult rat.

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July 2004
11 Reads

Ovarian dynamics and their associations with peripheral concentrations of gonadotropins, ovarian steroids, and inhibin during the estrous cycle in goats.

Biol Reprod 2003 Jul 5;69(1):57-63. Epub 2003 Feb 5.

Department of Theriogenology, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Suez Canal University, Ismailia, Egypt.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1095/biolreprod.102.013334DOI Listing
July 2003
7 Reads
3 Citations
3.320 Impact Factor

Effects of passive immunization of goats against inhibin on follicular development, hormone profile and ovulation rate.

Reproduction 2003 May;125(5):751-7

Department of Theriogenology, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Suez Canal University, Ismailia, Egypt.

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May 2003
14 Reads
5 Citations
3.174 Impact Factor

Ovarian and hormonal response of female goats to active immunization against inhibin.

J Endocrinol 2003 May;177(2):287-94

J. Endocrinol.

This study was conducted to evaluate the effect of active immunization against inhibin on hormonal levels and the ovulation rate in goats. Ten adult Shiba goats (Capra hircus) in two groups were used in this study. The first group was injected with inhibin vaccine (immunized, n=5) and the second group was injected with Freund's adjuvant (control, n=5) followed by three booster injections at 4-week intervals. After the third booster injection, three consecutive periods of oestrus were induced using prostaglandin F(2alpha) at intervals of 11 days. Blood samples were collected at 2-6 h intervals and the ovaries were monitored using B-mode ultrasonography. All inhibin-immunized goats generated antibodies that bound (125)I-labelled bovine inhibin and their FSH concentrations were significantly higher than corresponding values in the control group. Also, inhibin-immunized goats had significantly higher preovulatory oestradiol-17beta (P<0.01) and higher concentrations of progesterone in the luteal phase (P<0.05). Immunization of goats against inhibin resulted in a significant (P<0.01) increase in ovulation rate (control: 1.7+/-0.3 vs immunized: 7.6+/-1.1). These results demonstrate that active immunization against inhibin enhances ovarian follicular development and ovulation rate by promoting an increase in pituitary FSH secretion. Therefore, immunization against inhibin may be a useful alternative to the conventional approach of superovulation in goats.

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May 2003
13 Reads

Induction of estrus during the non-breeding season in Egyptian Baladi goats.

J Vet Med Sci 2002 Jan;64(1):83-5

Department of Theriogenology, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Suez Canal University, Ismailia, Egypt.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1292/jvms.64.83DOI Listing
January 2002
23 Reads
0.782 Impact Factor

Uterine involution and progesterone level during the postpartum period in Barbary ewes in north Libya

Open Veterinary Journal

The objectives of the present study were to determine the time of uterine involution and ovarian activity using ultrasound examination and progesterone assay. Weekly progesterone levels were measured starting one week postpartum until two weeks after the 1st postpartum estrus in Barbary ewes lambed during winter in AL-Bayda city, north of Libya. A total of 15 Barbary ewes were used in the present study distributed in three groups according to the month of lambing as group1 (lambed in January), group2 (lambed in February) and group3 (lambed in March). Ewes were examined weekly by trans-rectal ultrasound to check involution of the uterus starting one week after lambing until complete uterine involution. Blood samples were collected from jugular vein, serum was separated and stored at ˗20 ºC until measuring progesterone using ELISA. The results showed that uterine involution completed at day 35 postpartum in groups 1 and 2, while it occurred at day 28 in group 3. Also, the results showed that the mean progesterone level was basal (less than 1ng/ml) for a long period and started to increase at days 119, 99 and 77 postpartum in group 1, 2 and 3, respectively. One ewe did not show estrus at all during the period of study in group2 and there were no growing follicles on their ovaries. The obtained results indicate that, uterine involution as determined by ultrasound completed earlier in ewes lambed in March than those lambed in February or January. Also, progesterone level and ultrasound examination showed that there was no ovarian activity for a longtime after parturition indicating that reproduction in Barbary ewes tends to be seasonal in AL-Bayda city, north Libya.

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Determination of Fetal Gender by Ultrasound in Ewes and its Correlation with Maternal Serum Levels of Calcium, Phosphorus and Iron

Agricultural Research Journal; Suez Canal University

The purpose of this study was to evaluate the accuracy of ultrasonography for determination of the fetal gender and also to study the effect of fetal gender on the maternal serum levels of calcium, phosphorus and iron. Twenty four cyclic ewes were used in the present study. Estrus was detected two times daily at the morning and evening and the ewes detected in estrus were mated with fertile rams 3 times 12 hours interval. Blood samples were collected from each ewe on the day of mating and every 15 days until lambing or 150 days after mating for determination of calcium, phosphorus and iron. For detection of fetal gender, ultrasonographic examinations were performed transrectally or transabdominally using a real-time B-mode scanner equipped with a multiple-frequency (5, 7.5 or 10 MHz) transducer. Ultrasonographic examinations confirmed pregnancy of all ewes at day 30 post-mating and then all ewes examined two times weekly until taking decision of fetal gender type. The results showed that ultrasonography is a reliable method for pregnancy diagnosis in ewes with accuracy 100% at day 30 post-mating. Fetal gender identification was possible at day 50.95 post-mating with accuracy 92.3% for males and 87.5% for females. There were no significant effects of fetal gender on blood (calcium, phosphorus and iron) levels. On the other hand, there was a significant (P≤0.01) drop in calcium level from mid- to late gestation, and a significant elevation (P≤0.05) in iron level during the last month of gestation.In conclusion, trans-rectal or trans-abdominal B-mode ultrasonography was efficient in pregnancy diagnosis and determination of fetal gender in ewes. There was no obvious effect of fetal gender on the maternal serum levels of calcium, phosphorus and iron.

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Advances in ultrasonography and its applications in domestic ruminants and other farm animals reproduction

Journal of Advanced Research

Ultrasound techniques are becoming increasingly important in animal reproduction, offering both a mean of diagnosis and a useful therapeutic tool. Accordingly, understanding the use of ultrasound technology is critical in contemporary animal sciences, since ultrasound examinations are now a routine component of diagnostic workups in reproduction. Ultrasound technology offers the assessment of pregnancy status and foetal viability early post breeding in order to identify animals that fail to conceive, improving reproductive efficiency; early identification of animals carrying twin foetuses, allowing for the implementation of differential management strategies to avoid the negative effects of twinning on general health of the mother animal and also at parturition; and the visualisation of ovarian and uterine pathologies not accurately detected via rectal palpation, allowing appropriate therapies to be implemented. In addition, determination of foetal sex in utero can be done by ultrasonography. The new information that has been generated through ultrasound has thrown light on therapeutic uses, thereby opening up new areas for research. Moreover, ultrasound-guided interventional techniques can be used for diagnostic or therapeutic purposes. In this review, advances and applications of ultrasonography in domestic animal reproduction are reviewed.

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