Publications by authors named "Mohamed Rajab"

4 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Expression profiling of WD40 family genes including DDB1- and CUL4- associated factor (DCAF) genes in mice and human suggests important regulatory roles in testicular development and spermatogenesis.

BMC Genomics 2020 Aug 31;21(1):602. Epub 2020 Aug 31.

Department of Comparative Medicine, King Faisal Specialist Hospital & Research Centre, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia.

Background: The WD40-repeat containing proteins, including DDB1-CUL4-associated factors (DCAFs), are abundant and conserved proteins that play important roles in different cellular processes including spermatogenesis. DCAFs are subset of WD40 family proteins that contain WDxR motif and have been proposed to function as substrate receptor for Cullin4-RING-based E3 ubiquitin ligase complexes to recruit diverse proteins for ubiquitination, a vital process in spermatogenesis. Large number of WD40 genes has been identified in different species including mouse and human. However, a systematic expression profiling of WD40 genes in different tissues of mouse and human has not been investigated. We hypothesize that large number of WD40 genes may express highly or specifically in the testis, where their expression is uniquely regulated during testis development and spermatogenesis. Therefore, the objective of this study is to mine and characterize expression patterns of WD40 genes in different tissues of mouse and human with particular emphasis on DCAF genes expressions during mouse testicular development.

Results: Publically available RNA sequencing (RNA seq) data mining identified 347 and 349 WD40 genes in mouse and human, respectively. Hierarchical clustering and heat map analyses of RNA seq datasets revealed differential expression patterns of WD40 genes with around 60-73% of the genes were highly or specifically expressed in testis. Similarly, around 74-83% of DCAF genes were predominantly or specifically expressed in testis. Moreover, WD40 genes showed distinct expression patterns during embryonic and postnatal testis development in mice. Finally, different germ cell populations of testis showed specific patterns of WD40 genes expression. Predicted gene ontology analyses revealed more than 80% of these proteins are implicated in cellular, metabolic, biological regulation and cell localization processes.

Conclusions: We have identified large number of WD40 family genes that are highly or specifically expressed in the testes of mouse and human. Moreover, WD40 genes have distinct expression patterns during embryonic and postnatal development of the testis in mice. Further, different germ cell populations within the testis showed specific patterns of WD40 genes expression. These results provide foundation for further research towards understanding the functional genomics and molecular mechanisms of mammalian testis development and spermatogenesis.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12864-020-07016-9DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7457511PMC
August 2020

A molecular genetic analysis of childhood nephrotic syndrome in a cohort of Saudi Arabian families.

J Hum Genet 2013 Jul 18;58(7):480-9. Epub 2013 Apr 18.

Department of Genetics, King Faisal Specialist Hospital and Research Centre, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia.

Nephrotic syndrome (NS) is a renal disease characterized by heavy proteinuria, hypoalbuminemia, edema and hyperlipidemia. Its presentation within the first 3 months of life or in multiple family members suggests an underlying inherited cause. To determine the frequency of inherited NS, 62 cases (representing 49 families with NS) from Saudi Arabia were screened for mutations in NPHS1, NPHS2, LAMB2, PLCE1, CD2AP, MYO1E, WT1, PTPRO and Nei endonuclease VIII-like 1 (NEIL1). We detected likely causative mutations in 25 out of 49 families studied (51%). We found that the most common genetic cause of NS in our cohort was a homozygous mutation in the NPHS2 gene, found in 11 of the 49 families (22%). Mutations in the NPHS1 and PLCE1 genes allowed a molecular genetic diagnosis in 12% and 8% of families, respectively. We detected novel MYO1E mutations in three families (6%). No mutations were found in WT1, PTPRO or NEIL1. The pathogenicity of novel variants was analyzed by in silico tests and by genetic screening of ethnically matched control populations. This is the first report describing the molecular genetics of NS in the Arabian Peninsula.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/jhg.2013.27DOI Listing
July 2013

(1R,4R,5aS,7S,9aS)-7,9a-Dimethyl-6-methyl-ene-3-oxo-1,3,4,5,5a,6,7,8,9,9a-deca-hydro-naphtho-[1,2-c]furan-1,4-diyl diacetate.

Acta Crystallogr Sect E Struct Rep Online 2012 Sep 1;68(Pt 9):o2612-3. Epub 2012 Aug 1.

Department of Chemistry, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, LA 70803-1804, USA.

The title compound, C(19)H(24)O(6), is a sesquiterpene lactone isolated from the Kenyan plant Warburgia ugandensis. Ring A adopts a chair conformation, ring B is in a C(2) twist conformation and the lactone ring is nearly planar with maximum deviation 0.007 (1) Å. The reported absolute configuration is based on that of the similar compound bromo-parasiticolide A and is supported by analysis of Bijvoet differences from light atoms in Mo Kα radiation.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1107/S1600536812033636DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3435643PMC
September 2012

Cinnamolid-3beta-ol hemihydrate and 3beta-hydroxycinnamolide acetate, two drimanolide-class sesquiterpene lactones from Warburgia ugandensis.

Acta Crystallogr C 2006 Apr 18;62(Pt 4):o219-21. Epub 2006 Mar 18.

Department of Chemistry, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, LA 70803-1804, USA.

View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1107/S0108270106007177DOI Listing
April 2006