Publications by authors named "Mohamed M F Fathalla"

14 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

The role of newborn gender in postpartum depressive symptoms among women in Upper Egypt.

Int J Gynaecol Obstet 2014 May 1;125(2):138-40. Epub 2014 Feb 1.

Department of Psychiatry, Suhag University, Suhag, Egypt.

Objective: To assess the magnitude of postpartum depression among women in Upper Egypt, in addition to the role of newborn gender.

Methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted at the outpatient family-planning clinic of a university hospital. Women were enrolled if their first offspring was female and if they had 2 previous deliveries, the last within 3 months; no obstetric complications; regular marital life; middle social class or higher; and no past or family history of psychiatric illness. The Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale (EPDS) and Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) were used to assess the prevalence and severity of postpartum depressive symptoms.

Results: Of the 290 participants, 150 had a female second child (group 1) and 140 had a male second child (group 2). Overall, 113 (39.0%) women scored more than 13 on the EPDS: 70 in group 1 and 43 in group 2. Of the 113 women, 35 (31.0%) scored mild, 29 (25.7%) scored moderate, and 49 (43.4%) scored severe on the BDI. Significantly more women with a female second child had severe depression (P<0.001).

Conclusion: Postpartum depressive symptoms were common among the present sample of women in Upper Egypt. Having female-only offspring is an important potential risk factor for postpartum depression and its severity.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ijgo.2013.11.006DOI Listing
May 2014

Use of the non-pneumatic anti-shock garment (NASG) for life-threatening obstetric hemorrhage: a cost-effectiveness analysis in Egypt and Nigeria.

PLoS One 2013 30;8(4):e62282. Epub 2013 Apr 30.

University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas, United States of America.

Objective: To assess the cost-effectiveness of a non-pneumatic anti-shock garment (NASG) for obstetric hemorrhage in tertiary hospitals in Egypt and Nigeria.

Methods: We combined published data from pre-intervention/NASG-intervention clinical trials with costs from study sites. For each country, we used observed proportions of initial shock level (mild: mean arterial pressure [MAP] >60 mmHg; severe: MAP ≤60 mmHg) to define a standard population of 1,000 women presenting in shock. We examined three intervention scenarios: no women in shock receive the NASG, only women in severe shock receive the NASG, and all women in shock receive the NASG. Clinical data included frequencies of adverse health outcomes (mortality, severe morbidity, severe anemia), and interventions to manage bleeding (uterotonics, blood transfusions, hysterectomies). Costs (in 2010 international dollars) included the NASG, training, and clinical interventions. We compared costs and disability-adjusted life years (DALYs) across the intervention scenarios.

Results: For 1000 women presenting in shock, providing the NASG to those in severe shock results in decreased mortality and morbidity, which averts 357 DALYs in Egypt and 2,063 DALYs in Nigeria. Differences in use of interventions result in net savings of $9,489 in Egypt (primarily due to reduced transfusions) and net costs of $6,460 in Nigeria, with a cost per DALY averted of $3.13. Results of providing the NASG for women in mild shock has smaller and uncertain effects due to few clinical events in this data set.

Conclusion: Using the NASG for women in severe shock resulted in markedly improved health outcomes (2-2.9 DALYs averted per woman, primarily due to reduced mortality), with net savings or extremely low cost per DALY averted. This suggests that in resource-limited settings, the NASG is a very cost-effective intervention for women in severe hypovolemic shock. The effects of the NASG for mild shock are less certain.
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http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0062282PLOS
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3640005PMC
November 2013

Nonatonic obstetric haemorrhage: effectiveness of the nonpneumatic antishock garment in egypt.

ISRN Obstet Gynecol 2011 10;2011:179349. Epub 2011 Aug 10.

Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Faculty of Medicine, Assiut University Women's Health Center, P.O. Box 30, Assiut, Egypt.

The study aims to determine if the nonpneumatic antishock garment (NASG), a first aid compression device, decreases severe adverse outcomes from nonatonic obstetric haemorrhage. Women with nonatonic aetiologies (434), blood loss > 1000 mL, and signs of shock were eligible. Women received standard care during the preintervention phase (226) and standard care plus application of the garment in the NASG phase (208). Blood loss and extreme adverse outcomes (EAO-mortality and severe morbidity) were measured. Women who used the NASG had more estimated blood loss on admission. Mean measured blood loss was 370 mL in the preintervention phase and 258 mL in the NASG phase (P < 0.0001). EAO decreased with use of the garment (2.9% versus 4.4%, (OR 0.65, 95% CI 0.24-1.76)). In conclusion, using the NASG improved maternal outcomes despite the worse condition on study entry. These findings should be tested in larger studies.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.5402/2011/179349DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3154575PMC
November 2011

Implication of umbilical cord in preeclampsia.

Med Princ Pract 2011 20;20(2):124-8. Epub 2011 Jan 20.

Department of Biochemistry, Assiut University, Assiut, Egypt. ragaa_2002 @ yahoo.com

Objectives: To investigate the role of biochemical changes in the umbilical cord and placenta in developing preeclampsia (PE).

Subjects And Methods: Thirty women with PE and 15 healthy pregnant women as controls were enrolled in this study. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), soluble vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 1 (sVEGFR-1), platelet-derived endothelial cell growth factor (PD-ECGF), neutrophil elastase and nitric oxide (NO) were measured.

Results: Both serum (maternal and fetal) and tissue (placenta and umbilical cord) levels of VEGF, sVEGFR-1, PD-ECGF and neutrophil elastase were significantly increased, whereas NO was significantly decreased (except placental tissue showed no changes) in preeclamptic patients. The cord serum level of PD-ECGF was significantly higher in severe PE compared to mild PE and normal pregnant women. The placental and cord tissue levels of PD-ECGF and neutrophil elastase were significantly higher in severe PE, while the cord tissue level of NO was significantly lower in severe PE.

Conclusion: Our data showed that umbilical cord vessels and stroma can serve as an additional source of vasoactive and angiogenic substances that contribute to the biochemical changes occurring in PE.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1159/000321212DOI Listing
May 2011

Emergency contraception in the context of marriage in Upper Egypt.

Int J Gynaecol Obstet 2011 Mar 17;112(3):195-9. Epub 2011 Jan 17.

Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Assiut University, Assiut, Egypt.

Objective: To explore the degree of knowledge, perception, and practice of emergency contraception (EC) within marital relations in Egypt.

Methods: The present study was a pilot cross-sectional survey. Eligible participants were randomly selected from 4 governorates in Upper Egypt. A questionnaire was designed by the investigators and administered to an unselected sample of healthcare providers and potential users of EC. The questionnaire collected information in 4 domains: demographics; knowledge about EC; attitudes toward EC; and practice of EC in Egypt.

Results: In total, 240 healthcare providers and 60 potential users of EC completed the questionnaire. Approximately 85% of healthcare providers and 30% of potential users had heard about EC. A similar proportion of study participants said that EC methods are needed. Only 32.7% of healthcare providers and very few potential users had actually used EC.

Conclusion: There is a need for EC in Egypt. However, a big gap in knowledge leads to nonuse or incorrect use of EC and negative attitude toward it. If health service planners and policy makers could fill this gap, a considerable decline in the prevalence of unwanted pregnancy may be achieved by using EC.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ijgo.2010.09.013DOI Listing
March 2011

Global women's health in 2010: facing the challenges.

J Womens Health (Larchmt) 2010 Nov 28;19(11):2081-9. Epub 2010 Oct 28.

Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts 02120, USA.

Women's health is closely linked to a nation's level of development, with the leading causes of death in women in resource-poor nations attributable to preventable causes. Unlike many health problems in rich nations, the cure relies not only on the discovery of new medications or technology but also getting basic services to the people who need them most and addressing underlying injustice. In order to do this, political will and financial resources must be dedicated to developing and evaluating a scaleable approach to strengthen health systems, support community-based programs, and promote widespread campaigns to address gender inequality, including promoting girls' education. The Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) have highlighted the importance of addressing maternal health and promoting gender equality for the overall development strategy of a nation. We must capitalize on the momentum created by this and other international campaigns and continue to advocate for comprehensive strategies to improve global women's health.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1089/jwh.2010.2083DOI Listing
November 2010

Obstetric hemorrhage and shock management: using the low technology Non-pneumatic Anti-Shock Garment in Nigerian and Egyptian tertiary care facilities.

BMC Pregnancy Childbirth 2010 Oct 18;10:64. Epub 2010 Oct 18.

Department of Obstetrics, Gynecology and Reproductive Sciences, University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco, USA.

Background: Obstetric hemorrhage is the leading cause of maternal mortality globally. The Non-pneumatic Anti-Shock Garment (NASG) is a low-technology, first-aid compression device which, when added to standard hypovolemic shock protocols, may improve outcomes for women with hypovolemic shock secondary to obstetric hemorrhage in tertiary facilities in low-resource settings.

Methods: This study employed a pre-intervention/intervention design in four facilities in Nigeria and two in Egypt. Primary outcomes were measured mean and median blood loss, severe end-organ failure morbidity (renal failure, pulmonary failure, cardiac failure, or CNS dysfunctions), mortality, and emergency hysterectomy for 1442 women with ≥750 mL blood loss and at least one sign of hemodynamic instability. Comparisons of outcomes by study phase were assessed with rank sum tests, relative risks (RR), number needed to treat for benefit (NNTb), and multiple logistic regression.

Results: Women in the NASG phase (n = 835) were in worse condition on study entry, 38.5% with mean arterial pressure <60 mmHg vs. 29.9% in the pre-intervention phase (p = 0.001). Despite this, negative outcomes were significantly reduced in the NASG phase: mean measured blood loss decreased from 444 mL to 240 mL (p < 0.001), maternal mortality decreased from 6.3% to 3.5% (RR 0.56, 95% CI 0.35-0.89), severe morbidities from 3.7% to 0.7% (RR 0.20, 95% CI 0.08-0.50), and emergency hysterectomy from 8.9% to 4.0% (RR 0.44, 0.23-0.86). In multiple logistic regression, there was a 55% reduced odds of mortality during the NASG phase (aOR 0.45, 0.27-0.77). The NNTb to prevent either mortality or severe morbidity was 18 (12-36).

Conclusion: Adding the NASG to standard shock and hemorrhage management may significantly improve maternal outcomes from hypovolemic shock secondary to obstetric hemorrhage at tertiary care facilities in low-resource settings.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/1471-2393-10-64DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2966449PMC
October 2010

A comparative study of the non-pneumatic anti-shock garment for the treatment of obstetric hemorrhage in Egypt.

Int J Gynaecol Obstet 2010 Apr 22;109(1):20-4. Epub 2010 Jan 22.

Department of Obstetrics, Gynecology and Reproductive Sciences, University of California, San Francisco, CA 94105, USA.

Objective: To assess the impact of the non-pneumatic anti-shock garment (NASG) on maternal outcome following severe obstetric hemorrhage.

Methods: A non-randomized pre-intervention/intervention study was conducted in 2 tertiary hospitals in Egypt from June 2006 to May 2008. Women with obstetric hemorrhage (estimated blood loss >or=1000 mL and/or >or=1 sign of shock [systolic blood pressure <100 mm Hg or pulse >100 beats per minute]) were treated with either a standardized protocol (pre-intervention) or a standardized protocol plus the NASG (intervention). The primary outcome was extreme adverse outcome (EAO), combining maternal mortality and severe morbidity (cardiac, respiratory, renal, or cerebral dysfunction). Secondary outcomes were measured blood loss, urine output, emergency hysterectomy, and (individually) mortality or morbidity. Analyses were performed to examine independent association of the NASG with EAO.

Results: Mean measured blood loss decreased from 379 mL pre-intervention to 253 mL in the intervention group (P<0.01). In a multiple logistic regression model, the NASG was associated with reduced odds of EAO (odds ratio 0.38; 95% confidence interval, 0.17-0.85).

Conclusion: The NASG, in addition to standardized protocols at tertiary facilities for obstetric hemorrhage and shock, resulted in lower measured blood loss and reduced EAO.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ijgo.2009.11.016DOI Listing
April 2010

Maternal serum placental growth factor and soluble fms-like tyrosine kinase 1 as early predictors of preeclampsia.

Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand 2010 ;89(1):143-6

Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Assiut University, Assiut, Egypt.

Abstract The aim of this study was to identify pregnant women at risk of preeclampsia (PE) before clinical manifestations appeared using a panel of serum markers. We recruited 240 consecutive women who presented for antenatal care. We investigated whether serum levels of placental growth factor (PlGF), its inhibitor, soluble fms-like tyrosine kinase-1 (sFlt-1), measured at 13-16 weeks gestation and the expression of fms-like tyrosine kinase-1 (Flt-1) in the maternal neutrophils measured by flow cytometry could be predictive of the subsequent development of PE. Serum PlGF levels were found to be significantly lower among women who developed PE than patients with gestational hypertension or patients in the control group (p < 0.001). In contrast, serum sFlt1 levels were most elevated in patients who developed PE versus those with gestational hypertension or the control group (p < 0.001). Serum levels of neutrophil-Flt-1, however, were lower in women who developed PE than in those with gestational hypertension or those in the control group (p < 0.001). Increased serum levels of sFlt-1, decreased levels of neutrophil-Flt-1, and decreased levels of PlGF may predict women at risk of developing PE later in pregnancy.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3109/00016340903289892DOI Listing
January 2010

Prevalence and characteristics of female sexual dysfunction in a sample of women from Upper Egypt.

Int J Gynaecol Obstet 2010 Mar 14;108(3):219-23. Epub 2009 Dec 14.

Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Sohag University, Sohag, Egypt.

Objective: To study the prevalence and associated risk factors for female sexual dysfunction (FSD) in Upper Egypt.

Methods: Married women attending the outpatient clinic of Sohag University Hospital between February 2008 and March 2009 were recruited. Through direct interviews, each woman completed a questionnaire that included questions on sexual dysfunction.

Results: From 648 recruited patients, 47 declined to participate in the study. Of the 601 remaining participants, 462 women (76.9%) reported 1 or more sexual problems. Low sexual desire was the most common sexual problem (66.4%). Patients with FSD were significantly more likely to be older than 40 years, have sexual intercourse fewer than 3 times a week, have been married for 10 years or more, have 5 children or more, be circumcised, have a husband aged 40 years or more, and be postmenopausal. Age of the women maintained a statistically significant positive relationship with FSD in the regression model (odds ratio 1.39; 95% CI, 1.26-1.53).

Conclusions: There was a high prevalence of FSD in this sample of women from Upper Egypt. The prevalence of sexual problems increased with increasing age of the women.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ijgo.2009.09.031DOI Listing
March 2010

Modified balloon vaginoplasty: the fastest way to create a natural: minor changes in technique eliminate the need for customized instruments.

Am J Obstet Gynecol 2009 Nov;201(5):546.e1-5

Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Assiut University, Assiut, Egypt.

We studied the feasibility of performing balloon vaginoplasty (BV) with conventional laparoscopic instruments through 2 modified techniques aiming at providing BV for open use. Three of 6 cases with vaginal aplasia were offered modified laparoscopically assisted balloon vaginoplasty (LAB-V) and the other 3 cases underwent modified retropubic balloon vaginoplasty (RBV). We measured operative time, complications, anatomical outcomes, functional outcomes, and re-intervention rates. Modified RBV and LAB-V were performed successfully in the 6 cases within 9-12 and 29-38 min, respectively. The neovagina depths were 8-10 and 9-12 cm, respectively. Anterior rectal wall needle puncture was encountered in 1 case of LAB-V group and posterior urethral wall puncture in an abnormally dilated urethra in 1 case of the RBV group; both cases passed uneventfully. Intercourse was initiated after removal of all catheters. The neovagina was a cosmetically appealing mimic to nature and stained with iodine up to its apex. It was feasible to perform balloon vaginoplasty operations without specialized instrument sets with comparable outcomes.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ajog.2009.09.018DOI Listing
November 2009

Distension versus traction in laparoscopically assisted balloon vaginoplasty for management of vaginal aplasia.

Int J Gynaecol Obstet 2009 Jan 15;104(1):72-3. Epub 2008 Oct 15.

Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Faculty of Medicine, Assiut University, Assiut, Egypt.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ijgo.2008.08.001DOI Listing
January 2009

Gynecological and related morbidities among ever-married Omani women.

Afr J Reprod Health 2004 Dec;8(3):188-97

Department of Research and Studies, Ministry of Health Headquarters, Oman.

To assess the prevalence and correlates of gynecologic and related morbidity in Omani women, a nationally representative sample of Omani women selected by a multi-stage, stratified probability sampling procedure was selected (total = 364). Questionnaire interview, physical and gynecological examination, and laboratory investigations were used to elicit information. The prevalence of lower reproductive tract infections was 22.4%, upper reproductive tract infections 2.7%, and cervical dysplasia was very rare. Genital prolapse was present in 10%, 11% had a urinary infection, 27% were anaemic, 23% were hypertensive, and 54% were either overweight or obese. The predictors of common morbidities were assessed using regression analysis according to a pre-specified conceptual model.
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December 2004

Reliability of Omani women's self-reporting of gynaecologic morbidities.

Med Princ Pract 2005 Mar-Apr;14(2):92-7

Department of Research and Studies, Ministry of Health, Headquarters, Muscat, Oman.

Objectives: To assess the agreement of women's self-reports of gynaecologic morbidities (reproductive tract infections, RTIs; genital prolapse, and urinary tract infections, UTIs), physician's observations and the final diagnosis of these conditions.

Subjects And Methods: A nationally representative sample of 1,662 Omani women selected by a multi-stage, stratified probability-sampling procedure was included in the study. A questionnaire interview, physical and gynaecologic examination, and laboratory investigations were used.

Results: A total of 1,364 women completed all forms. The agreement between women's report of vaginal discharge and the diagnosis of RTI was poor. The sensitivity but not the specificity improved when the women were asked about specific discharge questions that upset them or are medically suspicious. Sensitivity of self-report in the diagnosis of genital prolapse and UTI from self-report was high but specificity was low.

Conclusions: Self-report of vaginal discharge, coupled with clinical examination, can be used in community diagnosis of RTI. Self-report of symptoms of vaginal prolapse can also be used for community diagnosis of genital prolapse. A urinary culture should supplement self-reports of UTI to enhance specificity, although the presence of a positive culture in the absence of symptoms is of no clinical significance in non-pregnant women or women without renal disease.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1159/000083918DOI Listing
June 2005