Publications by authors named "Mohamed El-Kishawi"

7 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

The role of prosthetic, orthodontic and implant-supported rehabilitation in the management of secondary malocclusion to maxillofacial trauma- A systematic review.

Saudi Dent J 2021 May 16;33(4):177-183. Epub 2020 Dec 16.

Department of Preventive and Restorative Dentistry, College of Dental Medicine, University of Sharjah, United Arab Emirates.

Purpose: Different approaches have been proposed to treat malocclusion secondary to the treatment of maxillofacial trauma. This study aimed to investigate the efficacy of prosthodontic treatment, orthodontic treatment, and implant-supported rehabilitation for the management of secondary malocclusion after maxillofacial trauma.

Study Selection: We searched five electronic databases and hand searched eight journals. The types of studies included were randomized controlled trials, cohorts, case-controls, and case series with at least eight patients with maxillofacial trauma and postoperative malocclusion. These studies used prosthetic treatment and implant-supported rehabilitation for secondary malocclusion after maxillofacial trauma. Risk of bias of eligible studies to be included in the final analysis was assessed independently by two authors using a tool for methodological quality assessment and synthesis of case series and case reports.

Results: After initial screening and identification of titles and abstracts, full text of 44 articles were found and evaluated against inclusion criteria. Of these 42 articles were excluded and remaining two were included in the review. Both the studies were case series with moderate to high risk of bias.

Conclusions: Both prosthetic treatment and implant-supported rehabilitation have the potential to restore secondary malocclusion after maxillofacial trauma. However, because less number of well-designed studies with high risk of bias were included in this systematic review, the findings should be interpreted with caution. Well-designed high-quality studies are required to draw definitive conclusions.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.sdentj.2020.12.004DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8117368PMC
May 2021

Evaluation of Conscious Monitoring and Movement Control Efforts Among Dental Students.

Percept Mot Skills 2021 May 3:315125211014869. Epub 2021 May 3.

Preventive and Restorative Dentistry Department, College of Dental Medicine, University of Sharjah, UAE.

Prior research has demonstrated that motor skill learning is often disrupted by self-focus and attempts to control movement. The propensity for reinvestment (i.e., self-focus and movement control) has been associated with poor motor skill learning in sport and surgery, but it has not yet been examined in dental education. Therefore, the aim of this study was to evaluate the propensity for disruptive reinvestment among dental students so as to optimize their learning needs. Volunteer dental students (210) completed three reinvestment surveys to investigate their self-reported propensity to engage in conscious self-monitoring and control of their movements and decisions. We used analysis of variance (ANOVA), with post-hoc analyses as appropriate, to assess the effect of various participant demographics on their reinvestment scores. Male participants had a lower mean reinvestment scale score than females ( < .05). Older participants were found to have a lower mean movement reinvestment score, compared to younger reinvesters ( < .05). On the other hand, younger reinvesters had a lower mean decision reinvestment score compared to the older age group ( < .05). When compared with participants in previous studies our participants obtained a significantly higher reinvestment score ( < .05). In conclusion, gender and age may be related to dental students' self-reported propensity to reinvest. Moreover, dental students were found to be more self-conscious when compared with individuals who perform gross motor skill tasks. These results provide insight into the acquisition of dental skills that may assist in designing pre-clinical training curriculum in dental education.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/00315125211014869DOI Listing
May 2021

How to Improve Fine Motor Skill Learning in Dentistry.

Int J Dent 2021 8;2021:6674213. Epub 2021 Feb 8.

School of Dentistry, The University of Adelaide, Adelaide, SA, Australia.

Introduction: Restorative dental treatment is a complex task involving various procedures which require the development and integration of both theoretical knowledge and fine motor skills. It aims to provide the theoretical background and role of key factors in learning these skills.

Materials And Methods: The following electronic databases were searched to identify relevant articles to our topic: PubMed, Medline, Google Scholar, and Scopus. Generic keywords, that is, factors, fine, performance, and dentistry, and MeSH terms, that is, "learning," "instruction," "patient simulation," "motor skills," "perception," "tactile," "neurophysiology," and "working memory" were used to conduct our comprehensive search. Several techniques are used in performing different restorative procedures in dentistry, that is, root canal preparation, root planning, and minor oral surgery procedures. Mastering these techniques requires a good understanding of the underpinning cognitive, sensory, and neuromuscular processes. Factors including the amount and timing of instructions provided, cognitive abilities, and practice schedule of learning trials may have significant implications on the design of fine motor skill learning exercises.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2021/6674213DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7884127PMC
February 2021

Effect of errorless learning on the acquisition of fine motor skills in pre-clinical endodontics.

Aust Endod J 2021 Apr 28;47(1):43-53. Epub 2020 Nov 28.

School of Dentistry, The University of Adelaide, Adelaide, South Australia, Australia.

This study aimed to evaluate the impact of errorless and errorful learning, on acquisition of root canal hand-instrumentation skills. Dental students prepared standardised canals of different diameters and curvatures. Learning involved minimising (errorless: n = 21) or maximising errors (errorful: n = 21). Students who had completed accredited pre-clinical activities provided comparative data (n = 17). During testing, the distal canal of a plastic mandibular molar was prepared, first as a single task and then under multi-tasking conditions. Performance was assessed by preparation accuracy and time. Differences were assessed using anova (P < 0.05). Performance in the experimental groups was similar during learning. When multi-tasking, errorful learners showed a deterioration in preparation accuracy (P < 0.05). In contrast, preparation accuracy and completion times for the errorless and comparative groups remained stable when multi-tasking. Errorless learning resulted in stable performance under multi-tasking conditions. Investigation of alternative approaches to learning motor skills in dentistry is warranted as such approaches may provide better outcomes, especially under demanding conditions.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/aej.12464DOI Listing
April 2021

Rethinking Assessment Concepts in Dental Education.

Int J Dent 2020 14;2020:8672303. Epub 2020 Oct 14.

Department of Preventive and Restorative Dentistry, University of Sharjah, PO Box 27272, Sharjah, UAE.

Introduction: Dental education involves teaching and assessing the acquisition of verifiable domains that require superior psychomotor, communication, and cognitive skills. Evolving technologies and methods of assessment could enhance student's learning environment and improve tutor assessment experience. The aim of this study was to review the current body of research and evaluate the effectiveness of various methods of assessments in improving learning and performance in preclinical and clinical dental practice.

Materials And Methods: A search strategy was implemented using electronic search in major databases. The following key terms, clinical skills, preclinical, dental students, and assessment, were included in the search. Two reviewers independently screened all the articles retrieved following very specific inclusion criteria.

Results: The initial search generated 5371 articles and 24 articles were selected for review and data extraction. Cohen's kappa coefficient was used to measure interrater agreement and a score of 94.7% was obtained.

Conclusion: Preclinical assessment is an effective tool for promoting skills transfer to clinical phase. Early psychomotor skills assessment is valuable. It allows early intervention in the learning process and assists in effective utilization of learning resources. Technology-enhanced assessment systems allow better patient simulation, enhance learning and self-assessment experiences, and improve performance evaluation. However, these systems serve as an adjunct to conventional assessment methods. Further research should aim at calibrating and integrating these systems to optimize students learning and performance.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2020/8672303DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7584943PMC
October 2020

Introducing a comprehensive high-stake online exam to final-year dental students during the COVID-19 pandemic and evaluation of its effectiveness.

Med Educ Online 2020 Dec;25(1):1826861

College of Dental Medicine, University of Sharjah , Sharjah, UAE.

Background: Dental education involves teaching and assessing the acquisition of verifiable domains that require superior psychomotor, communication, and cognitive skills. Evolving technologies and methods of assessment could enhance student learning environment and improve tutor assessment experience.

Objective: The aim of this study was to introduce the application of a comprehensive high-stakes online exam to final-year dental students during the COVID-19 pandemic and evaluate its effectiveness.

Design: A high-stakes exam was introduced and implemented online to the final-year dental students prior to their graduation. The exam consisted of four components: MEQs, MCQs, OSCE and an oral exam. The exam and invigilation were conducted using Blackboard and MS Teams programs. Stakeholders' views of the exam were obtained using two tailored surveys, one for students and another for faculty; both included closed- and open-ended questions.

Results: The exam was run successfully without untoward events. Both students and staff were satisfied with the online exam with the latter being more satisfied than the former. Students with previous experience in online learning system were more satisfied with the online exam compared with those with less experience ( < 0.05). The main issues raised by students' satisfaction with the exam were: inadequacy of time for the MEQ part, prevention of back tracking in the MCQ part and minor technological issues, whereas those raised by faculty members were increased time required to complete the exam setup and grading compared to the paper-based exam and minor technological issues.

Conclusions: A newly introduced, multi-format, online high-stakes exam was implemented successfully to final-year dental students with minor technological issues and good satisfaction by students and staff alike.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/10872981.2020.1826861DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7580847PMC
December 2020

Effectiveness of technology-enhanced teaching and assessment methods of undergraduate preclinical dental skills: a systematic review of randomized controlled clinical trials.

BMC Med Educ 2020 Aug 28;20(1):286. Epub 2020 Aug 28.

Department of Preventive and Restorative Dentistry, College of Dental Medicine, University of Sharjah, Sharjah, United Arab Emirates.

Background: To investigate the effectiveness of technology-enhanced teaching and assessment methods of undergraduate preclinical skills in comparison to conventional methods.

Methods: A comprehensive search strategy was implemented using both manual and electronic search methods, including PubMed, Wiley, ScienceDirect, SCOPUS, and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials. The search and selection of articles that met the inclusion criteria were carried out in duplicates. A Cochrane data extraction form for RCTs was used to extract the relevant information from all included articles. Risk of bias of all included articles was assessed independently by two authors using the Cochrane risk of bias tool.

Results: A total of 19 randomized controlled clinical trials met the inclusion criteria and were included in this review. The majority of the studies included in this review have a high risk of bias mainly due to incomplete data, lack of blinding of the examiners, and due to other biases, such as small sample sizes, not accounting for additional hours of training, and the lack of calibration of examiners grading the preparations. Conflicting results were reported in the included studies with regards to whether there were differences between the intervention and control groups in the outcome measure of quality of students' performance. A meta-analysis could not be done for this study due to the heterogeneity among the included studies.

Conclusions: Technology-enhanced teaching and assessment tools used in preclinical skills training of undergraduate dental students have the potential to improve students' performance. However, due to the conflicting outcomes reported in the 19 studies included in this systematic review and their high risk of bias, better quality studies are required to find a definitive answer to the research question of this systematic review.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12909-020-02211-4DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7455918PMC
August 2020