Publications by authors named "Mohamad Khasawneh"

8 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Cases from the irAE Tumor Board: A Multidisciplinary Approach to a Patient Treated with Immune Checkpoint Blockade Who Presented with a New Rash.

Oncologist 2019 01 24;24(1):4-8. Epub 2018 Oct 24.

Department of Hematology and Oncology, Taussig Cancer Institute, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, Ohio, USA

Immune checkpoint inhibitors (ICIs) have revolutionized the treatment paradigms for a broad spectrum of malignancies. Because immune checkpoint inhibitors rely on immune reactivation to eliminate cancer cells, they can also lead to the loss of immune tolerance and result in a wide range of phenomena called immune-related adverse events (irAEs). At our institution, the management of irAEs is based on multidisciplinary input obtained at an irAE tumor board that facilitates expedited opinions from various specialties and allows for a more uniform approach to these patients. In this article, we describe a case of a patient with metastatic urothelial carcinoma who developed a maculopapular rash while being treated with a programmed death-ligand 1 inhibitor. We then describe the approach to management of dermatologic toxicities with ICIs based on the discussion at our irAE Tumor Board. KEY POINTS: Innocuous symptoms such as pruritis or a maculopapular rash may herald potentially fatal severe cutaneous adverse reactions (SCARs); therefore, close attention must be paid to the symptoms, history, and physical examination of all patients.Consultation with dermatology should be sought for patients with grade 3 or 4 toxicity or SCARs and prior to resumption of immune checkpoint inhibitors for patients with grade 3 or higher toxicity.A multidisciplinary immune-related adverse events (irAE) tumor board can facilitate timely input and expertise from various specialties, thereby ensuring a streamlined approach to management of irAEs.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1634/theoncologist.2018-0434DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6324641PMC
January 2019

Cancer metabolism and oxidative stress: Insights into carcinogenesis and chemotherapy via the non-dihydrofolate reductase effects of methotrexate.

BBA Clin 2015 Jun 7;3:152-61. Epub 2015 Feb 7.

Marshall University School of Medicine, Edwards Comprehensive Cancer Center, 1400 Hal Greer Blvd., Huntington, WV 25701, United States.

Methotrexate has been in use as an anti-cancer agent for over 60 years. Though inhibition of dihydrofolate reductase is its best known mechanisms of action, its non-dihydrofolate reductase dependent mechanisms disrupt metabolic pathways resulting in a depletion of NAD(P)H and increasing oxidative stress. These mechanisms highlight a novel dependence of cancer cells on their metabolic abnormalities to buffer oxidative stress and chemotherapeutic agents interfere with these cellular abilities. Mitochondria appear to play a significant role in maintaining cancer cell viability and alterations in metabolism seen in cancer cells aid this mitochondrial ability. Further research is needed to understand the effects of other chemotherapeutic agents on these pathways.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.bbacli.2015.01.006DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4661551PMC
June 2015

Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome after Treatment of Metastatic Prostate Cancer with Taxotere: A Case Report and Literature Review.

Case Rep Urol 2015 13;2015:198381. Epub 2015 Aug 13.

Division of Hematology-Oncology, Department of Medicine, Joan C. Edwards School of Medicine, Marshall University, Edward Comprehensive Care Center, Huntington, WV 25701, USA.

Prostate cancer is the most common cancer in men. Docetaxel is a common chemotherapeutic agent that has proven its efficacy in the treatment of patients with both castration sensitive and resistant metastatic prostate cancer. We report a case of acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) in a patient with metastatic prostate cancer treated with docetaxel (Taxotere). ARDS is very rare but life threatening complication of docetaxel which requires aggressive supportive care and close monitoring. Better awareness and prompt diagnosis of this treatment related ARDS will improve the effectiveness and outcome of its management.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/198381DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4550759PMC
September 2015

Recent discoveries in molecular characterization of acute myeloid leukemia.

Curr Hematol Malig Rep 2014 Jun;9(2):93-9

Edwards Comprehensive Cancer Center, Department of Oncological Sciences, Marshall University School of Medicine, 1400 Hal Greer Blvd, Huntington, WV, 25701-4114, USA,

Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is a clinically heterogeneous disease, yet it is one of the most molecularly well-characterized cancers. Risk stratification of patients currently involves determination of the presence of cytogenetic abnormalities in combination with molecular genetic testing in a few genes. Several new recurrent genetic molecular abnormalities have recently been identified, including TET2, ASXL1, IDH1, IDH2, DNMT3A, and PHF6. Mutational analyses have identified that patients with DNMT3A or NPM1 mutations or MLL translocation have improved overall survival with high-dose chemotherapy. Mutational profiling can refine prognostication, particularly for patients in the intermediate-risk group or with a normal karyotype. CD25 expression status improves prognostic risk classification in AML independent of established biomarkers. Biomarkers such as 2- hydroxyglutarate in IDH1/2-mutant AML patients predict patient responses and minimal residual disease. These recent discoveries are being incorporated into our existing molecular risk stratification as well as the exploration of new therapeutics directed to these molecular targets.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11899-014-0200-yDOI Listing
June 2014

Sunitinib-induced macrocytosis in patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma.

Cancer 2008 Sep;113(6):1309-14

Department of Solid Tumor Oncology, Cleveland Clinic Taussig Cancer Institute, Cleveland, Ohio 44195, USA.

Background: Sunitinib and sorafenib are small molecules that inhibit the vascular endothelial growth factor and related receptors with substantial clinical activity reported in metastatic renal cell carcinoma (RCC). Cytopenia and macrocytosis have been described in patients treated with these agents.

Methods: A retrospective review of all patients with metastatic RCC who were treated with sunitinib or sorafenib for at least 3 months at the Cleveland Clinic Taussig Cancer Institute was undertaken. Complete blood count (CBC) data including red blood cell indices were recorded at baseline, after 3 months of therapy, and at the end of treatment.

Results: A total of 61 patients were treated with sunitinib and 37 patients were treated with sorafenib with available CBC data. In patients treated with sunitinib, the median corpuscular volume (MCV) increased significantly at 3 months compared with baseline (median increase of 5.1 femtoliters [fL]; P < .001) and continued to increase throughout treatment. Patients who developed hypothyroidism had a larger MCV increase at 3 months than patients who remained euthyroid (P = .06), although macrocytosis was observed in patients without hypothyroidism. Ten patients discontinued sunitinib therapy, and the MCV decreased in all patients within 2 to 4 months, without further intervention. Bone marrow analysis of 4 patients revealed a hypocellular bone marrow with trilineage hematopoiesis and no evidence of metastasis. There was no evidence of folate or vitamin B12 deficiency. In contrast to sunitinib, there was no change in the MCV for patients treated with sorafenib.

Conclusions: Macrocytosis was a common occurrence after treatment with sunitinib but not sorafenib in patients with metastatic RCC. Sunitinib-induced macrocytosis is reversible with drug discontinuation.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/cncr.23711DOI Listing
September 2008

An association between renal cell carcinoma and multiple myeloma: a case series and clinical implications.

BJU Int 2008 Mar 26;101(6):712-5. Epub 2007 Oct 26.

Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA.

Objective: To describe an association between renal cell carcinoma (RCC) and multiple myeloma (MM) in patients with both disorders, and suggest possible explanations for the association.

Patients And Methods: We retrospectively reviewed the records of patients with MM and RCC at the Cleveland Clinic between 1990 and 2005, and identified 1100 with MM, 2704 with RCC and eight with concomitant MM and RCC. The medical records of these eight patients were reviewed.

Results: In four of the eight patients, RCC was diagnosed after the MM at 3, 8, 23 and 46 months, respectively; in the remaining four, the RCC was diagnosed before MM by 108, 35, 13 and 1 months, respectively. The number of cases of RCC expected in the present 1100 patients with MM over 15 years was lower than the four recorded (P < 0.001, Fisher's exact test). Similarly, the number of cases of MM expected in the 2704 patients with RCC was also lower than the four recorded (P < 0.001, Fisher's exact test).

Conclusions: RCC and MM can occur in the same patient at an incidence higher than the expected rate. Possible explanations include genetic abnormalities, environmental exposures or immune-related mechanisms predisposing to the second malignancy. These findings are particularly relevant in the management of patients with known RCC and lytic bone lesions, or those with known MM and subsequent or concomitant renal masses, especially those involving the right kidney.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1464-410X.2007.07268.xDOI Listing
March 2008

Clinical factors associated with outcome in patients with metastatic clear-cell renal cell carcinoma treated with vascular endothelial growth factor-targeted therapy.

Cancer 2007 Aug;110(3):543-50

Cleveland Clinic Taussig Cancer Center, Cleveland, Ohio, USA.

Background: Therapy targeted against the vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) pathway is a standard of care for patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma (RCC). The identification of patients who are more likely to benefit from these agents is warranted.

Methods: In total, 120 patients with metastatic clear-cell RCC received bevacizumab, sorafenib, sunitinib, or axitinib on 1 of 9 prospective clinical trials at the Cleveland Clinic. Clinical features associated with outcome were identified by univariate analysis; then, a stepwise modeling approach based on Cox proportional hazards regression was used to identify independent prognostic factors and to form a model for progression-free survival (PFS). A bootstrap algorithm was used to provide internal validation.

Results: The overall median PFS was 13.8 months, and the objective response according to the Response Criteria in Solid Tumors was 34%. Multivariate analysis identified time from diagnosis to current treatment <2 years; baseline platelet and neutrophil counts >300 K/microL and >4.5 K/microL, respectively; baseline corrected serum calcium <8.5 mg/dL or >10 mg/dL; and initial Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status >0 as independent, adverse prognostic factors (PF) for PFS. Three prognostic subgroups were formed based on the number of adverse prognostic factors present. The median PFS in patients with 0 or 1 adverse prognostic factor was 20.1 months compared with 13 months in patients with 2 adverse prognostic factors and 3.9 months in patients with >2 adverse prognostic factors.

Conclusions: Five independent prognostic factors for predicting PFS were identified and were used to categorize patients with metastatic RCC who received VEGF-targeted therapies into 3 risk groups. These prognostic factors can be incorporated into patient care and clinical trials that use such novel, VEGF-targeted agents.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/cncr.22827DOI Listing
August 2007

Pathways of dysregulation in renal cell carcinoma: rational approaches to development of novel treatment.

Clin Genitourin Cancer 2006 Dec;5 Suppl 1:S7-S18

Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH 44195-0001, USA.

Recent developments have involved a series of novel agents that produce clinical benefit in patients with advanced clear-cell renal cell carcinoma (RCC). The molecular characteristics of RCC, pathways involved in growth and progression, and development of targeted therapeutic approaches have become the focus of many investigators in the past decade. A variety of genetic abnormalities, molecular markers and drugs that target these markers or alter the genetic expression of certain regulatory proteins, have been identified and might have clinical significance for prognosis and treatment. However, specific markers associated with RCC and further development of novel single or combination targeted therapies is now required. An understanding of the complicated and unique biologic behavior of RCC and its various histologic subtypes is crucial for the continued development of novel and targeted therapies.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3816/cgc.2006.s.002DOI Listing
December 2006
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