Publications by authors named "Mitu Dogra"

6 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Growth Factor Variation in Two Types of Autologous Platelet Biomaterials: PRP Versus PRF.

Indian J Hematol Blood Transfus 2017 Jun 6;33(2):288-292. Epub 2016 Sep 6.

Department of Transfusion Medicine, Dr Ram Manohar Lohia Hospital, New Delhi, India.

Autologous platelet biomaterials represent a key source of cytokines and growth factors extensively used for clinical and surgical applications involving tissue regeneration; wound healing and tissue repair. In this communication we discuss the growth factors released by activated platelet rich plasma (PRP) and platelet rich fibrin (PRF) releasate. Our study highlights that significantly higher growth factors (TGF-ß1) are released by activated PRP as compared to releasate of PRF. The various growth factors released by both platelet products are significantly higher than the baseline concentration in the whole blood and have different bio-mechanism hence should be individualized as per the clinical indication.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s12288-016-0721-8DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5442062PMC
June 2017

Transfusion-related adverse reactions: From institutional hemovigilance effort to National Hemovigilance program.

Asian J Transfus Sci 2016 Jan-Jun;10(1):31-6

Departement of Immunohematology and Blood Transfusion Medicine, Government Medical College, Jammu, Jammu and Kashmir, India.

Aims: In this study we have evaluated the various adverse reactions related to transfusion occurring in our institution as a pilot institutional effort toward a hemovigilance program. This study will also help in understanding the problems faced by blood banks/Transfusion Medicine departments in implementing an effective hemovigilance program.

Materials And Methods: All the adverse reactions related to transfusion of whole blood and its components in various clinical specialties were studied for a period of 1 year. Any transfusion-related adverse event was worked up in accordance with guidelines laid down by the Directorate General of Health Services (DGHS) and departmental standard operating procedures.

Results: During the study period from November 1, 2011 to October 31, 2012, 45812 components were issued [30939 WB/PRBC; 12704 fresh frozen plasma (FFP); 2169 platelets]. Risk estimation per 1000 units of red cells (WB/PRBC) transfused was estimated to be: 0.8 for febrile nonhemolytic transfusion reaction (FNHTR), 0.7 for allergic reaction, 0.19 for acute hemolytic transfusion reaction (AcHTR), 0.002 for anaphylactoid reactions, 0.1 for bacterial sepsis, and 0.06 for hypervolemia and hypocalcemia. 0.09 is the risk for delayed transfusion reaction and 0.03 is the risk for transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI). Risk estimate per 1,000 units of platelets transfused was estimated to be 1.38 for FNHTR, 1.18 for allergic reaction, and 1 in case of bacterial sepsis. Risk estimation per 1,000 units of FFP was estimated to be 0.15 for FNHTR and 0.2 for allergic reactions.

Conclusions: Factors such as clerical checks at various levels, improvement in blood storage conditions outside blood banks, leukodepletion, better inventory management, careful donor screening, bedside monitoring of transfusion, and documentation of adverse events may decrease transfusion-related adverse events. Better coordination between transfusion specialists and various clinical specialties is the need of the hour and it will help in making the whole transfusion chain safe and effective. There is a need for a hemovigilance program at the national level so that true incidence and the spectrum of adverse events due to transfusion are known and policies formulated to minimize the risks associated with it.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.4103/0973-6247.175391DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4782490PMC
March 2016

Quantification of platelets and platelet derived growth factors from platelet-rich-plasma (PRP) prepared at different centrifugal force (g) and time.

Transfus Apher Sci 2016 Feb 3;54(1):103-10. Epub 2016 Feb 3.

Department of Transfusion Medicine, Dr Ram Manohar Lohia Hospital, New Delhi, India.

Introduction: Platelet derived biomaterials represent a key source of cytokines and growth factors extensively used for tissue regeneration; wound healing and tissue repair. Our study was to quantify platelets and growth factors released by PRP when prepared at different centrifugal force (g) and time.

Material And Methods: Our study was approved by the institutional ethical committee. One hundred millilitres of whole blood (WB) was collected in bag with CPDA as the anticoagulant(AC); (14 mL for 100 mL WB ratio). Nine aliquots of 10 mL each were made from the bag and set of three aliquots were made a group. PRP was prepared at varying centrifugal force (group A: -110 g, group B: -208 g & group C: -440 g) & time (1: -5 min, 2: -10 min & 3: -20 min). Contents of each PRP prepared were analysed. Commercial sandwich ELISA kits were used to quantify the concentrations of CD62P (Diaclone SAS; France), Platelet derived growth factors-AB (Qayee-Bio; China), transforming growth factor-β1 (DRG; Germany) and vascular endothelial growth factor (Boster Immuno Leader; USA) released in each PRP prepared.

Results: Eight volunteers were enrolled in the study (24-30 years). The baseline blood counts of all the volunteers were comparable (p ≥ 0.05). Mean ± SD of platelet yield of all nine groups ranged from 17.2 ± 4.2% to 78.7 ± 5.7%. Each PRP was activated with calcified thromboplastin to quantify the growth factors released by them. Significantly higher (p < 0.05) transforming growth factor-β1 and vascular endothelial growth factor were released compared to the baseline.

Conclusion: Our study highlights the variation in both force (g) and time results in changes at cellular level and growth factor concentrations.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.transci.2016.01.028DOI Listing
February 2016

Hemolysis: A positive agglutination reaction while studying titration of anti A/B antibody for ABO-incompatible solid organ transplants.

Asian J Transfus Sci 2015 Jul-Dec;9(2):115-6

Department of Transfusion Medicine, Post Graduate Institute of Medical Education and Research, Dr. Ram Manohar Lohia Hospital, New Delhi, India.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.4103/0973-6247.162682DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4562127PMC
September 2015

Comparative analysis of activity of coagulation Factors V and VIII and level of fibrinogen in fresh frozen plasma and frozen plasma.

Asian J Transfus Sci 2015 Jan-Jun;9(1):6-8

Department of Immunohematology and Transfusion Medicine, GMC, Jammu, Jammu and Kashmir, India.

Background: The aim of this study was to analyse and compare the activity of factor V, VIII and fibrinogen level in fresh frozen plasma and frozen plasma frozen after 8 hrs but within 24 hours after phlebotomy.

Materials And Methods: Fresh frozen plasma separated from whole blood within 8 hours was compared with plasma separated within 24 hours after phlebotomy in terms of coagulation factors V and VIII and level of fibrinogen by standard methods using semi automated coagulometer sysmex CA50.

Results: Longer storage of whole blood before processing resulted in significant decrease (18.4%) in activity of factor VIII but the fall in activity of factor V (6.52%) or level of fibrinogen (1.81%) was not significant.

Discussion: These data suggest that there is good retention of coagulation factors in both types of plasma. Although there is significant fall in activity of factor VIII, but it is an acute phase reactant and raised in most of the diseases so it is suggested that frozen plasma would be an acceptable product for most patients requiring fresh frozen plasma.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.4103/0973-6247.150936DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4339934PMC
February 2015

Study of adverse whole blood donor reactions in normal healthy blood donors: experience of tertiary health care centre in jammu region.

Indian J Hematol Blood Transfus 2015 Mar 8;31(1):142-5. Epub 2014 May 8.

Government Medical College, Jammu, Jammu, India.

Whole blood donation is generally a safe procedure, but sometimes adverse reactions of varying severity may occur during or at completion of blood donation process. The aim of the present study was to estimate the frequency and type of adverse events during blood donation. This retrospective study conducted from November 2011 to December 2012 at Department of Blood Transfusion Medicine GMC Jammu. All whole blood donations at our Department was analyzed. All adverse events occurring during or at end of donation were noted using standardized format. Overall 108 adverse events were reported in relation to 29,524 donations, resulting in overall adverse event rate of 0.365 %. Presyncopal reactions in other words vasovagal reactions of mild intensity, were the most commonly observed adverse reactions and accounted for approximately 58/108 (53.70 %) of all adverse reactions noted. Only 0.365 % of blood donations were complicated by adverse events and most of these events were presyncopal symptoms. Our study reinforces that blood donation is a very safe procedure which could be made even more event free by following certain friendly, reassuring and tactful practices.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s12288-014-0396-yDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4275519PMC
March 2015