Publications by authors named "Misha Koshelev"

19 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Papulovesicular lesions near the right breast.

JAAD Case Rep 2021 Dec 24;18:64-66. Epub 2021 Aug 24.

Department of Dermatology, University of Texas at Houston Health Science Center, Houston, Texas.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jdcr.2021.07.042DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8605304PMC
December 2021

Assessing dermatology resident confidence in caring for patients with skin of color.

Clin Dermatol 2021 Sep-Oct;39(5):873-878. Epub 2021 Aug 20.

Department of Dermatology, The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston, Houston, Texas, USA.

Many dermatology residency programs lack sufficient didactics and experiences with patients with skin of color (SOC). This may impact resident confidence with this patient population, which may affect patient satisfaction and perceptions of care. Dermatology residents nationwide were surveyed to determine their confidence in care of patients with SOC and white skin across several dimensions, including detailing morphology, making diagnostic and therapeutic decisions, tailoring treatment recommendations, and detecting suspicious lesions. A total of 125 dermatology residents representing 46 programs (of 119, 39%) responded. Resident confidence was significantly lower across all categories measured regarding caring for patients with SOC compared with patients with white skin (P <.001). After multivariate analysis adjusting for demographic and residency program characteristics, confidence in caring for patients with SOC remained significantly lower. Residents in programs with SOC education (i.e., SOC didactics, SOC clinical rotation) reported significantly higher confidence in one or more aspects of SOC care compared with residents in programs without such curricula. A deficiency in SOC education may contribute to the lower resident confidence observed. Integrating only one type of SOC education into residents' curricula, although helpful, may not sufficiently enhance confidence across all dimensions of care. A multifaceted approach is needed.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.clindermatol.2021.08.019DOI Listing
November 2021

Antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibody positivity and cutaneous IgA vasculitis in a patient with antisynthetase syndrome.

JAAD Case Rep 2021 Dec 20;18:26-28. Epub 2021 Oct 20.

Department of Dermatology, University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston, Houston, Texas.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jdcr.2021.10.012DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8577075PMC
December 2021

Granular cell tumor: importance of histopathology in determining malignant potential.

Dermatol Online J 2021 May 15;27(5). Epub 2021 May 15.

Department of Dermatology, University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston, Houston, TX.

Granular cell tumors (GCTs), sometimes called Abrikossoff tumors, are rare and typically benign soft tissue tumors. Malignant GCTs, which are even rarer than benign GCTs, can occur and must be detected early given their high mortality rate. Distinguishing between benign and malignant GCTs is difficult clinically; however, histologic evaluation plays an essential role in this endeavor.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.5070/D327553617DOI Listing
May 2021

Acrokeratoelastoidosis: is there an association between asthma and sporadic cases in children?

Dermatol Online J 2020 Dec 15;26(12). Epub 2020 Dec 15.

Department of Dermatology, The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston, Houston, TX.

Acrokeratoelastoidosis (AKE) is a rare, benign papular keratoderma that presents as keratotic papules on the lateral margins of the palms and soles. It is most commonly inherited in an autosomal dominant fashion, although sporadic cases are also described. We present a sporadic case of AKE in an 11-year-old girl with a past medical history significant for asthma. On literature review, we found three other cases presenting in children with a past medical history of asthma. We suggest a possible association between asthma and sporadic cases of AKE in children. Current understanding of the pathophysiology of AKE and its associated risk factors is limited and no effective treatment exists. Awareness of a possible association with asthma and atopy, careful history recording in young patients presenting with sporadic cases of AKE, and further research may help to delineate the likelihood of an association between AKE and asthma or atopy. Developing a better understanding of the associated factors that may contribute to the disease process may help guide more effective, targeted treatments in the future.
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December 2020

Linezolid as a treatment option for cutaneous non-tuberculous mycobacterial infections.

Dermatol Online J 2020 Sep 15;26(9). Epub 2020 Sep 15.

Department of Dermatology, The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston, Houston, TX.

Cutaneous non-tuberculous mycobacterial (NTM) infections have rapidly increased in incidence in recent years. Currently there is no standard treatment and the variable and nonspecific ways in which cutaneous NTM infection presents makes it a therapeutic and diagnostic challenge. We describe a 67-year-old immunocompetent woman with cutaneous NTM infection after she recently underwent a root canal procedure. Although the species was not identified and she was unable to tolerate multiple antibiotics, she ultimately responded well to three months of treatment with linezolid. Given that cutaneous NTM infection can present in immunocompetent patients and that the incidence is rising, it is important for clinicians to maintain a high index of clinical suspicion, especially in patients with a recent history of surgery, trauma, or cosmetic procedures. Linezolid has coverage against non-tuberculous mycobacteria and is an effective therapeutic option for cutaneous NTM cases in which identification to the species level is not possible or when adverse effects limit therapeutic options.
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September 2020

Upcoming topical TRPV1 anti-pruritic compounds.

Dermatol Online J 2020 Sep 15;26(9). Epub 2020 Sep 15.

Department of Dermatology, University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston, Houston, TX.

Transient receptor potential vanilloid type 1 (TRPV1) is found on sensory neurons, keratinocytes, sebocytes, and dendritic cells. Activated TRPV1 channels are believed to help propagate the itch sensation. Therefore, there has been great interest in targeting TRPV1 to treat pruritus. Since oral formulations aimed at TRPV1 have led to adverse effects such as hyperthermia, there has been emphasis on developing novel topical agents. Several companies are investigating topical TRPV1 anti-pruritic compounds and the initial data has been very promising. These drugs have the potential to be important treatment options for the management of itch. This paper reviews topical products in current development for pruritus that target TRPV1 channels.
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September 2020

Reply to "Medical students' ability to diagnose common dermatologic conditions in skin of color".

J Am Acad Dermatol 2020 12 29;83(6):e455-e456. Epub 2020 Jul 29.

Department of Dermatology, The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston, Houston, Texas.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jaad.2020.07.102DOI Listing
December 2020

The association of broadband internet access with dermatology practitioners: An ecologic study.

J Am Acad Dermatol 2020 Dec 31;83(6):1767-1770. Epub 2020 Mar 31.

Department of Dermatology, Loma Linda University Health, Loma Linda, California.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jaad.2020.03.065DOI Listing
December 2020

HIV patient with painless bilateral external ear nodules.

JAAD Case Rep 2020 Mar 20;6(3):222-224. Epub 2020 Feb 20.

Department of Dermatology, University of Texas McGovern Medical School at Houston, Houston, Texas.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jdcr.2020.01.010DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7037540PMC
March 2020

Hydroxyurea-induced hyperpigmentation with iron deposition.

Dermatol Online J 2019 Oct 15;25(10). Epub 2019 Oct 15.

McGovern Medical School, Houston, TX.

Hydroxyurea is a chemotherapeutic agent that is used in the treatment of various hematological diseases including chronic myelogenous leukemia, polycythemia vera, and sickle cell anemia. Hydroxyurea is also used to treat psoriasis. Drug-induced hyperpigmentation is a known cutaneous side effect of hydroxyurea along with xerosis, dermal ulcers, and dermatomyositis-like eruptions. Hyperpigmentation has been observed in the oral mucosa, nails, and in a generalized or a diffuse pattern. The mechanism of hyperpigmentation related to hydroxyurea is believed to be correlated with increased melanin. Classically, clinical types of diffuse hyperpigmentation owing to iron deposition in the dermis have been associated with minocycline and not with hydroxyurea. We report a novel case in which hydroxyurea hyperpigmentation is associated with iron deposition.
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October 2019

Histiocytoid Sweet syndrome recalcitrant to prednisone causing severe scarring.

JAAD Case Rep 2019 Nov 24;5(11):937-939. Epub 2019 Oct 24.

Department of Dermatology, University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston, Houston, Texas.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jdcr.2019.09.006DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6820278PMC
November 2019

An unusual series of patients with Kaposi sarcoma.

JAAD Case Rep 2019 Aug 31;5(8):646-649. Epub 2019 Jul 31.

McGovern Medical School at University of Texas Health Science Center, Houston, Texas.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jdcr.2019.05.016DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6677764PMC
August 2019

A toxic epidermal necrolysis-like presentation of linear IgA bullous dermatosis treated with dapsone.

Dermatol Online J 2017 Aug 15;23(8). Epub 2017 Aug 15.

Department of Dermatology, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, Texas.

Linear IgA bullous dermatosis is a rare autoimmune vesiculobullous disease characterized by linear deposition of IgA along the basement membrane zone. It is classically idiopathic, but may also arise secondary to drug exposure. A heterogeneous spectrum of clinical features has been described, including a rare, morbid variant mimicking toxic epidermal necrolysis. Herein, we present a case of vancomycin-induced linear IgA bullous dermatosis that manifested clinically as toxic epidermal necrolysis and resolved with dapsone therapy.
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August 2017

Cutaneous leishmaniasis in Cuban immigrants to Texas who traveled through the Darién Jungle, Panama.

Am J Trop Med Hyg 2014 Aug 27;91(2):345-7. Epub 2014 May 27.

Medical Scientist Training Program, Interdepartmental Program in Translational Biology and Molecular Medicine, Department of Dermatology, Department of Pathology and Immunology, Department of Pediatrics, National School of Tropical Medicine, and Department of Medicine, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, Texas; Department of Dermatology, University of Texas Health Science Center, Houston, Texas.

Cutaneous leishmaniasis is rarely seen in the United States. Four Cuban immigrants traveled along the same route at different times from Cuba to Ecuador, then northward, including through the Darién Jungle in Panama. These patients had chronic ulcerative non-healing skin lesions and were given a diagnosis of leishmaniasis.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.4269/ajtmh.14-0124DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4125260PMC
August 2014

Concurrent hidradenitis suppurativa, inflammatory acne, dissecting cellulitis of the scalp, and pyoderma gangrenosum in a 16-year-old boy.

Pediatr Dermatol 2014 Jan-Feb;31(1):e20-1. Epub 2013 Sep 30.

Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX.

We report the case of a 16-year-old boy who presented to our clinic with concomitant hidradenitis suppurativa, inflammatory acne, dissecting cellulitis of the scalp, and pyoderma gangrenosum. Recent reports describe the co-occurrence of pyoderma gangrenosum, acne, and hidradenitis suppurativa. This case further expands the spectrum of concomitant pyoderma gangrenosum and dissecting cellulitis of the scalp.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/pde.12196DOI Listing
September 2014

Fixed drug eruption related to ibuprofen presenting as giant bullae on the posterior thigh.

Dermatol Online J 2012 Nov 15;18(11):10. Epub 2012 Nov 15.

MSTP Program, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, Texas, USA.

Fixed drug eruptions (FDEs), first described by Bourns in 1889, are solitary or multiple, sharply demarcated, round to oval, edematous and erythematous patches that arise after exposure to a specific medication. They can be pink to dark red to brown and can be larger than 10 cm in size. In almost a third of patients in some case series, these lesions have been reported to progress to vesicles or bullae. Fixed drug eruptions have been associated in up to 40 percent of cases with non-steroidal inflammatory drugs, including ibuprofen. We describe an interesting case of a biopsy-confirmed FDE that presented as large bullae on the posterior thigh after ibuprofen use.
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November 2012

Biosensor approach to psychopathology classification.

PLoS Comput Biol 2010 Oct 21;6(10):e1000966. Epub 2010 Oct 21.

Program in Cell and Molecular Biology, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, Texas, USA.

We used a multi-round, two-party exchange game in which a healthy subject played a subject diagnosed with a DSM-IV (Diagnostic and Statistics Manual-IV) disorder, and applied a Bayesian clustering approach to the behavior exhibited by the healthy subject. The goal was to characterize quantitatively the style of play elicited in the healthy subject (the proposer) by their DSM-diagnosed partner (the responder). The approach exploits the dynamics of the behavior elicited in the healthy proposer as a biosensor for cognitive features that characterize the psychopathology group at the other side of the interaction. Using a large cohort of subjects (n = 574), we found statistically significant clustering of proposers' behavior overlapping with a range of DSM-IV disorders including autism spectrum disorder, borderline personality disorder, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, and major depressive disorder. To further validate these results, we developed a computer agent to replace the human subject in the proposer role (the biosensor) and show that it can also detect these same four DSM-defined disorders. These results suggest that the highly developed social sensitivities that humans bring to a two-party social exchange can be exploited and automated to detect important psychopathologies, using an interpersonal behavioral probe not directly related to the defining diagnostic criteria.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1371/journal.pcbi.1000966DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2958801PMC
October 2010

Heart-specific overexpression of CUGBP1 reproduces functional and molecular abnormalities of myotonic dystrophy type 1.

Hum Mol Genet 2010 Mar 5;19(6):1066-75. Epub 2010 Jan 5.

Department of Pathology, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX 77030, USA.

Myotonic dystrophy type 1 (DM1) is caused by a CTG expansion within the 3'-untranslated region of the DMPK gene. The predominant mechanism of pathogenesis is a toxic gain of function of CUG repeat containing RNA transcribed from the expanded allele. The molecular mechanisms by which the RNA containing expanded repeats produce pathogenic effects include: sequestration of muscleblind-like 1 (MBNL1) protein and up-regulation of CUG binding protein 1 (CUGBP1). MBNL1 and CUGBP1 are RNA binding proteins that regulate alternative splicing transitions during development. Altered functions of these proteins in DM1 lead to misregulated splicing of their target genes, resulting in several features of the disease. The role of MBNL1 depletion in DM1 is well established through a mouse knock-out model that reproduces many disease features. Here we directly test the hypothesis that CUGBP1 up-regulation also contributes to manifestations of DM1. Using tetracycline-inducible CUGBP1 and heart-specific reverse tetracycline trans-activator transgenes, we expressed human CUGBP1 in adult mouse heart. Our results demonstrate that up-regulation of CUGBP1 is sufficient to reproduce molecular, histopathological and functional changes observed in a previously described DM1 mouse model that expresses expanded CUG RNA repeats as well as in individuals with DM1. These results strongly support a role for CUGBP1 up-regulation in DM1 pathogenesis.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/hmg/ddp570DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2830830PMC
March 2010
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