Publications by authors named "Misako Urabe"

26 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

A record of juvenile Paragonimus skrjabini miyazakii from the urinary bladder of the Japanese toad, Bufo japonicus formosus.

Parasitol Int 2022 Feb 28;86:102474. Epub 2021 Sep 28.

Division of Environmental Dynamics, Graduate School of Environmental Science, The University of Shiga Prefecture, Shiga 522-8533, Japan.

We found juveniles of Paragonimus in the urinary bladder of a Japanese toad (Bufo japonicus formosus) captured in Kyoto. These were molecularly identified as Paragonimus skrjabini miyazakii Kamo, Nishida, Hatsushika et Tomimura 1961. This is the first report of P. s. miyazakii found in anuran hosts in Japan, indicating that anurans can be paratenic hosts of P. s. miyazakii, as is also the case for Paragonimus skrjabini skrjabini in China. This finding suggests that definitive hosts of P. s. miyazakii can be infected by eating not only crabs or mammal paratenic hosts, but also anurans.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.parint.2021.102474DOI Listing
February 2022

Systematics of Crepidostomum species from the Russian Far East and northern Japan, with description of a new species and validation of the genus Stephanophiala.

Parasitol Int 2021 Oct 22;84:102412. Epub 2021 Jun 22.

Department of Ecosystem Studies, School of Environmental Science, The University of Shiga Prefecture, Shiga 522-8533, Japan.

Current article touched upon the issue of the complicated taxonomic status of some species from the genus Crepidostomum collected from the freshwater fish in the rivers of Primorsky region, Sakhalin, and Hokkaido Islands. Primary morphological analyses showed affiliation of the worms to the species C. farionis (Müller, 1784) Lühe, 1909; C. metoecus Braun, 1900b; C. chaenogobii Yamaguti and Matsumura, 1942; C. nemachilus Krotov, 1959. We described the new species Crepidostomum achmerovi sp. nov. that is a sibling species of C. nemachilus. Molecular-genetic investigation have shown that C. nemachilus and C. achmerovi sp. nov. are closely related to C. metoecus in both 28S rDNA and cox1 mtDNA markers. Crepidostomum nemachilus forms a separate branch within the C. metoecus clade on the 28S BI tree with strong statistical support and separate clade in relation to C. metoecus clade on the cox1 BI tree. Values of p-distances between Crepidostomum species were at intergeneric level. Crepidostomum metoecus species complex including five species (C. metoecus, C. nemachilus, C. oschmarini, C. brinkmanni, and C. achmerovi sp. nov.) was reconsidered as independent genus Crepidostomum sensu stricto. Minimum Spanning Network showed that C. nemachilus, C. metoecus and C. achmerovi sp. nov. were separated by large number of mutational events and represent independent phyletic lines. An amended diagnosis is provided for the subfamily Crepidostomatinae, the genera Crepidostomum s. str. and Stephanophiala Nicoll, 1909, along with keys to species of both genera.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.parint.2021.102412DOI Listing
October 2021

A new species of hemiuroidean trematode from Hatcheria macraei (Siluriformes, Trichomycteridae) and Heleobia hatcheri (Gastropoda, Cochliopidae) in a Patagonian River.

Parasitol Res 2021 Jul 24;120(7):2523-2532. Epub 2021 Jun 24.

Laboratorio de Parasitología, INIBIOMA (CONICET-Univ. Nac. del Comahue), Quintral 1250, (8400), San Carlos de Bariloche, Río Negro, Argentina.

A new hemiuroidean species, Genarchella pichileufuensis n. sp. (Derogenidae: Halipeginae), was found in the stomach of the siluriform freshwater fish, Hatcheria macraei (Girard, 1855), in the Pichileufu River, Patagonia, Argentina. Its rediae with immature cystophorous cercariae were found in the snail Heleobia hatcheri (Pilsbry, 1911) in the same site. The present new species is morphologically featured by having a cyclocoel in the hindbody unlike the other species of the genus. The characteristics of this species allowed us to amend the diagnosis of the genus Genarchella as follows: cyclocoel present or absent; testes symmetrical to tandem; ootype pouch present. In the phylogenetic analysis, G. pichileufuensis forms a well-supported clade with Genarchella spp. recovered from Mexican freshwater fishes. This clade is included in the cluster of representatives of the subfamily Halipeginae. So far, three hemiuroidean species, Thometrema patagonica (Szidat, 1956), Derogenes lacustris Tsuchida, Flores, Viozzi, Rauque et Urabe, 2021 and G. pichileufuensis n. sp., have been reported from freshwater fishes in Argentinean Patagonia.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00436-021-07210-yDOI Listing
July 2021

Hemiuroidean trematodes from freshwater Patagonian fishes: description of a new species, distribution and molecular phylogeny.

Parasitol Res 2021 Apr 1;120(4):1219-1232. Epub 2021 Feb 1.

Department of Ecosystem Studies, School of Environmental Sciences, The University of Shiga Prefecture, 2500 Hassaka, Hikone, Shiga, 522-8533, Japan.

A new trematode species, Derogenes lacustris Tsuchida, Flores, Viozzi, Rauque et Urabe n. sp. (Derogenidae: Derogeninae), from freshwater fishes is described using morphological and molecular approaches in Argentinean Patagonia. D. lacustris is the most common hemiuroidean species in the Limay River basin and parasitizes almost all the native and introduced Patagonian freshwater fish. This new species could be considered as the unique freshwater species in the genus Derogenes Nicoll, 1910. Another hemiuroidean species, Thometrema patagonica Szidat (Archiev Hydrobiol 51: 542-577, 1956) Lunaschi et Drago 2000 (Derogenidae: Halipeginae), is found from Percichthys trucha (Perciformes) in the Neuquén River basin. Its diagnosis and molecular data are provided by the present study. In the molecular analysis of the Patagonian hemiuroideans, T. patagonica composes a group with halipeginean species in the phylogenetic tree of 28S rDNA sequences, while D. lacustris is not included in the same group. D. lacustris also shows low intraspecific variation in COI sequences regardless of the localities or host species.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00436-020-06939-2DOI Listing
April 2021

Ancient drainage networks mediated a large-scale genetic introgression in the East Asian freshwater snails.

Ecol Evol 2020 Aug 14;10(15):8186-8196. Epub 2020 Jul 14.

Division of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology Graduate School of Life Sciences Tohoku University Sendai Japan.

Biogeography and genetic variation of freshwater organisms are influenced not only by current freshwater connections but also by past drainage networks. The Seto Inland Sea is a shallow enclosed sea in Japan, but geological evidence showed that a large freshwater drainage had intermittently appeared in this area between the late Pliocene and Pleistocene. Here, we demonstrated that this paleodrainage greatly affected the genetic variation of the East Asian freshwater snails, spp. We found that the mtDNA haplotypes originated in the Lake Biwa endemic species at the upstream side of the paleodrainage were frequently observed in the riverine species at its downstream side. The genome-wide DNA and morphological analyses consistently showed that there was no clear evidence of nuclear introgression between the Lake Biwa endemics and riverine species. These results suggest that the large paleodrainage had facilitated mitochondrial introgression and had broadly spread the introgressed mtDNA haplotypes to its downstream region around the Seto Inland Sea. Our study highlights the role of paleodrainages in shaping the genetic variation of freshwater organisms.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ece3.6523DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7417214PMC
August 2020

Morphological and molecular studies of Eudiplozoon nipponicum (Goto, 1891) and Eudiplozoon kamegaii sp. n. (Monogenea; Diplozoidae).

Folia Parasitol (Praha) 2020 Jul 28;67. Epub 2020 Jul 28.

School of Environmental Science, The University of Shiga Prefecture, Hikone-City, Japan.

Eudiplozoon nipponicum (Goto, 1891) Khotenovsky, 1985 (Monogenea: Diplozoidae), is known to parasitise Cyprinus carpio Linnaeus and species of Carassius. In this study, we conducted a taxonomic re-examination of E. nipponicum using genetic analysis and morphological comparisons from different host species from a single water system. rDNA nucleotide sequences of the internal transcription spacer 2 (ITS-2) region (645 bp) showed interspecific-level genetic differences among diplozoids from species of Carassius and C. carpio (p-distance: 3.1-4.0%) but no difference among those from different species of Carassius (0-0.4%) or between those from C. carpio collected in Asia and Europe (0-1.1%). Large variation was observed among 346 bp cytochrome c oxidase subunit I (COI) sequences (0.3-16.0 %); the topology of the phylogenetic tree showed no relationship to host genera or geographical regions of origin. Morphological observation showed that average clamp size of diplozoids from C. carpio was larger than those from Carassius spp. The number of folds on the hindbody was 10-25 for diplozoids from C. carpio and 12-19 for those from Carassius spp. Thus, our ITS-2 sequence and morphological comparison results indicate that diplozoids from C. carpio and species of Carassius belong to different species. The scientific name E. nipponicum should be applied to the species infected to the type host, Carassius sp. of Nakabo (2013) (Japanese name ginbuna). The diplozoid infecting C. carpio (Eurasian type) should be established as a new species: Eudiplozoon kamegaii sp. n. A neotype of E. nipponicum is designated in this report because the original E. nipponicum specimens are thought to have been lost.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.14411/fp.2020.018DOI Listing
July 2020

Description and molecular characteristics of Morishitium polonicum malayense Urabe, Nor Hashim & Uni, n. subsp. (Trematoda: Cyclocoelidae) from the Asian glossy starling, Aplonis panayensis strigata (Passeriformes: Sturnidae) in Peninsular Malaysia.

Parasitol Int 2020 Jun 10;76:102074. Epub 2020 Feb 10.

Institute of Biological Sciences, Faculty of Science, University of Malaya, 50603 Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia.

We describe Morishitium polonicum malayense n. subsp. from Asian glossy starlings (Aplonis panayensis strigata) (Horsfield, 1821) (Passeriformis: Sturnidae) caught in Malaysia. The trematodes had parasitized the air sacs and the thoracic and body cavities of 40 out of 67 (59.7%) birds examined. The specimens each had an oral sucker, a postpharyngeal genital pore, and tandem testes, but lacked a ventral sucker. The morphological characteristics of our specimens were similar to those of M. polonicum polonicum (Machalska, 1980) from Poland. However, the anterior extremity of vitelline follicles of the present specimens sometimes extended to the level of pharynx. The oral sucker width, oral sucker width/pharynx width ratio, and intertesticular space metrics differed from those of M. p. polonicum. The maximum-likelihood trees based on the cytochrome c oxidase subunit I (COI) and the internal transcribed spacer 2 (ITS2) sequences indicated that the species from the present study formed a sister group with M. p. polonicum from the Czech Republic. The p-distances of COI and ITS2 sequences between the present specimens and M. p. polonicum from the Czech Republic were 6.9-7.5% and 0.6%, respectively. These genetic divergences indicate the border for intra- or interspecific variation of digeneans. The definitive host species and geographical distribution of the current specimens were distinct from those of M. p. polonicum from Europe. We thus concluded that the present specimens are ranked as a new subspecies of M. polonicum, namely M. polonicum malayense n. subsp.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.parint.2020.102074DOI Listing
June 2020

The curious case of the endemic freshwater crocodile Crocodylus mindorensis as incidental host of marine fish acanthocephalan.

Parasitol Int 2019 Oct 12;72:101940. Epub 2019 Jun 12.

National Museum of the Philippines, 1000 Padre Burgos Drive, Ermita, Manila, Philippines.

We performed the first host-parasite survey of the Philippine crocodile, Crocodylus mindorensis, a critically endangered species for which ecological information is lacking. We collected by gastric lavage samples of the stomach contents of crocodiles (n = 10) residing at the Palawan Wildlife Rescue and Conservation Center in Puerto Princesa, Palawan, Philippines. The only parasite detected was an acanthocephalan, which was identified as Neorhadinorhynchus nudus (n = 68), a parasite typically found in the marine fish species consumed by three crocodile individuals. Given the known hosts of N. nudus, its parasitism of C. mindorensis in captivity is likely established by consumption of marine fish. Our findings have implications for the conservation management of C. mindorensis, particularly in terms of preventing introduction of parasites that could lead to development of infectious disease or alter the fitness of captive animals.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.parint.2019.101940DOI Listing
October 2019

Recent lake expansion triggered the adaptive radiation of freshwater snails in the ancient Lake Biwa.

Evol Lett 2019 Feb 30;3(1):43-54. Epub 2018 Nov 30.

Department of Environmental Life Sciences, Graduate School of Life Sciences Tohoku University Kawauchi 41 Aoba-ku Sendai 980-0862 Japan.

Lake expansion that leads to the formation of new habitats has potential to drive intralacustrine diversification. The ancient Lake Biwa in central Japan has historically experienced substantial changes in the lake size, and it provides a useful system for evaluating the role of lake-size fluctuations in the diversification of endemic fauna. Here, we used genome-wide DNA analyses and reconstructed the diversification history of the endemic freshwater snails belonging to the subgenus with respect to the geological history of Lake Biwa. We found that two genetically distinct snail lineages independently colonized Lake Biwa and they concurrently and rapidly radiated into 15 extant species. A combination of paleontological evidence and molecular dating technique demonstrated that the radiation of was tightly linked to the latest enlargement of the lake about 0.4 million years ago and suggested that increased ecological opportunity associated with the lake expansion drove the rapid adaptive radiation. We propose that the snails in Lake Biwa offer a promising new system for understanding the association between the geological history of the lake and rapid intralacustrine diversification.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/evl3.92DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6369999PMC
February 2019

Phylogenetic analysis of the superfamily Hemiuroidea (Platyhelminthes, Neodermata: Trematoda) based on partial 28S rDNA sequences.

Parasitology 2019 04 5;146(5):596-603. Epub 2018 Nov 5.

Russian Federal Research Institute of Fisheries and Oceanography,Moscow, V. Krasnoselskaya Str., 17, 107140,Russia.

In the present paper, the phylogenetic relationships between genera, subfamilies and families of the Hemiuroidea are explored. Twelve new sequences of 28 rDNA and data taken from GenBank (NSBI) on 43 species affiliated to 34 genera were included in the analysis. Most of the hemiuroidean trematodes form two highly supported clades (A and B), which are sister groups to each other. Hemipera manteri joined with Gonocerca spp. with moderate statistical support. This clade is basal relative to the clades A and B. Сlade A is polytomic and contains representatives of the families Accacoeliidae, Syncoeliidae, Didymozoidae, Hirudinellidae and Sclerodistomidae, and derogenid subfamilies Derogeninae and Halipeginae. At the same time, the Syncoeliidae, Hirudinellidae and Accacoeliidae form a well-supported monophyletic group. The phylogenetic relationship between Derogeninae and Halipeginae is poorly resolved. Сlade B unites the isoparorchiid, bunocotylid, lecithasterid and hemiurid trematodes. Our data re-establishes the family Bunocotylidae, which consists of two subfamilies, Opisthadeninae and Bunocotylinae, and the Machidatrema chilostoma + Hysterolecithoides frontilatus group. The Bunocotylidae is the sister group to the Hemiuridae + Lecithasteridae group and the Isoparorchiidae is a basal relative to the representatives of these three hemiuroid families.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/S0031182018001841DOI Listing
April 2019

Taxonomic tools for the identification of g n. sp. (Digenea: Hemiuroidea: Derogenidae) from of Rohilkhand, India based on light and scanning electron microscopic studies.

J Parasit Dis 2017 Mar 16;41(1):29-39. Epub 2016 Mar 16.

Department of Ecosystem Studies, School of Environmental Sciences, The University of Shiga Prefecture, 2500 Hassaka, Hikone, Shiga 522 8533 Japan.

The stomach of the freshwater snakehead murrel, (n = 250) collected from fresh water habitats of Bareilly, Uttar Pradesh, India revealed , a trematode parasite (Plagiorchiida: Derogenidae). An illustrated account of light (Olympus BX-53 with Cellsens software imaging system) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) (Neo JCM-6000) of n. sp. (prevalence 37 %, intensity 1-4 par/host) is provided. Light microscopy based studies warranting creation of a new species are the robust shape of the body with broad mid-body, blunt anterior and tapering posterior end, large ventral sucker, ratio of oral sucker: ventral sucker 1:3.5, pharynx broader than long, egg size small with relatively short egg filament, excretory vesicle U-shaped bifurcating at posterior end and terminating above intestinal shoulders. Key characteristics of the tegumental microtopography by SEM are (1) an aspinous tegument with a variety of papillae of different shapes (button-like, dome-shaped) distributed randomly on the dorsal and ventral surface (2) oral sucker and oral cavity muscular with fringed margins and morphologically different oral papillae (3) lip of ventral sucker papillated including two unequally spaced rows of papillae with sensory receptacles interspersed in between, (4) unique differentially texturized cytoplasmic processes on the ventral sucker and (5) body folds grooved, gradually becoming narrower towards posterior end. This is the first record and study on from of Rohilkhand, India using electron optics. We recommend that the newly recognized morphological features as revealed by light microscopy and SEM be utilized as taxonomic tools in future for the identification of the species.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s12639-015-0745-2DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5339168PMC
March 2017

Larval stages of Neoplagioporus elongatus (Goto and Ozaki, 1930) (Opecoelidae: Plagioporinae), with notes on potential second intermediate hosts.

Parasitol Int 2017 Apr 10;66(2):181-185. Epub 2017 Jan 10.

Department of Ecosystem Studies, School of Environmental Science, The University of Shiga Prefecture, 2500 Hassaka, Hikone, Shiga 522-8533, Japan. Electronic address:

The morphology of sporocysts and cercariae of Neoplagioporus elongatus (Goto and Ozaki, 1930) is described for the first time. A cotylomicrocercous cercaria obtained from the sorbeoconch snail Semisulcospira nakasekoae was confirmed to be the cercaria of N. elongatus, based on the degree of sequence identity of the COI gene to that of adult worms. Freshwater annelids (oligochaetes and leeches) and some aquatic insects (odonates) were demonstrated experimentally to be potential second intermediate hosts.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.parint.2016.12.012DOI Listing
April 2017

Experimental infection of the digeneans to some congeneric snail species radiated in a single water system: Relative importance of local evolution and phylogenetic constraint.

Authors:
Misako Urabe

Parasitol Int 2016 Jun 7;65(3):221-6. Epub 2016 Jan 7.

Department of Ecosystem Studies, School of Environmental Science, The University of Shiga Prefecture, 2500 Hassaka, Hikone, Shiga 522-8533, Japan. Electronic address:

To determine the relative importance of local adaptation caused by host-parasite coevolution and resource tracking by the parasites, the susceptibility of the freshwater snail genus Semisulcospira to the digenean parasite genus Genarchopsis was investigated experimentally. Four snail species endemic to the Lake Biwa system in Japan and two non-endemic species were investigated. All but one species was also tested for local variation in susceptibility. Parasites were obtained from Takashima (mix population of Genarchopsis gigi and Genarchopsis chubuensis) and Nagahama (G. chubuensis). In endemic Semisulcospira, closely related specie pairs (Semisulcospira habei and Semisulcospira niponica, Semisulcospira decipiens and Semisulcospira nakasekoae) showed similar susceptibilities to parasites from both localities. S. habei and S. niponica were highly susceptible to parasites from Takashima, but were resistant to parasites from Nagahama. S. decipiens and S. nakasekoae showed moderate susceptibility to parasites from both localities. None of the endemic snail species showed a clear local variation in susceptibility. These results show that the susceptibility of endemic Semisulcospira to Genarchopsis is conservative and can be regarded as an example of resource-tracking. One of the non-endemic snails, Semisulcospira libertina, showed local variation in susceptibility. This variation was not related to the sympatry of the parasites used for the experimental infection, suggesting that it was not the result of local adaptation by parasites.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.parint.2016.01.003DOI Listing
June 2016

Unionid Freshwater Mussels in Irrigation Ditches are Affected by Physical Environmental Factors and Proximity to Paddy Fields.

Zoolog Sci 2015 Aug;32(4):378-82

2 Faculty of Environmental Science, University of Shiga Prefecture, 2500, Hassaka, Hikone, Shiga 522-8533, Japan.

Irrigation ditches are the major habitat of lotic unionid mussels in Japan. To conserve and rebuild irrigation ditches facilitating mussel conservation, suitable physical environments must be clarified. The effect on mussels of paddy fields connected to ditches also needs to be determined. In this study, physical environmental factors that affect the density of unionid mussels were studied in irrigation ditches in Hikone City, Shiga Prefecture, Japan, to examine whether mussel densities were higher around paddy fields. Generalized linear models were used to analyze physical and paddy field environmental variables affecting mussel density. Our results show that sediment type, sediment softness, water depth, and flow velocity of irrigation ditches affect the density of unionid mussels; the effects of each environment factor and their relative importance differed by species. Specifically, the density of Nodularia douglasiae biwae was higher in ditches with sand-gravel sediment, soft sediment, and not adjoining paddy fields. The density of Pronodularia japanensis was higher in ditches with sand-gravel sediment and not adjoining paddy fields. The density of Lanceolaria grayana was higher in ditches with high flow velocity, not adjoining paddy fields, close to Lake Biwa. The density of Sinanodonta japonica was higher in ditches with mud sediment, shallow depth, high flow velocity, and not adjoining paddy fields. The densities of all four species were lower in irrigation ditches that were closely connected to paddy fields, suggesting that paddy drainage water negatively affects the survival of the mussels.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.2108/zs150001DOI Listing
August 2015

The life cycle and molecular phylogeny of a gorgoderid trematode recorded from the mussel Nodularia douglasiae in the Yodo River, Japan.

Parasitol Int 2015 Feb 9;64(1):26-32. Epub 2014 Sep 9.

Aquatic Life Conservation Center, Research Institute of Environment, Agriculture, and Fisheries, Koyamotomachi 10-4 Neyagawa, Osaka 572-833, Japan.

In 2009, a novel larval trematode of the family Gorgoderidae was found in the gonads of Nodularia douglasiae (Unionidae) from the lower reaches of the Yodo River, Osaka Prefecture, Japan. This is the first collection of trematodes in a unionid mussel in Japan. We investigated the morphology and life cycle of the trematode, and conducted a molecular phylogenetic analysis with other gorgoderid species, both those collected in the Yodo River water system and those reported in the literature. Immature adult worms were obtained from the ureters of the common carp Cyprinus carpio, the first known instance of a gorgoderid from these fish in Japan. Morphological characteristics and molecular data show that it belongs to the subfamily Gorgoderinae (genus Phyllodistomum sensu lato). Regarding the morphology, first intermediate host, and the infection site of adult worms, it resembles Phyllodistomum elongatum Nybelin, 1926 from Europe, but no comparable molecular data exist for Ph. elongatum. Three cytochrome c oxidase subunit I haplotypes were detected in the specimens analyzed, suggesting that the present species is indigenous to the Yodo River water system. The 28S ribosomal DNA data showed that this species is a member of the clade consisting of Ph. cf. symmetorchis, Ph. folium, Pseudophyllodistomum and Xystretrum. However, its phylogenetic position within the clade differs between the maximum likelihood and maximum parsimony trees, and the sister species of the present species remain unclear.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.parint.2014.09.003DOI Listing
February 2015

Two human cases infected by the horsehair worm, Parachordodes sp. (Nematomorpha: Chordodidae), in Japan.

Korean J Parasitol 2012 Sep 13;50(3):263-7. Epub 2012 Aug 13.

Department of Infectious Diseases, Kyoto Prefectural University of Medicine, Kyoto, Japan.

The present study was performed to describe 2 human cases infected by the horsehair worm, Parachordodes sp., in Japan. Two gordiid worms were collected in the vomit and excreta of an 80-year-old woman in November 2009 in Kyoto city, and in the mouth of 1-year-old boy in December 2009 in Nara city, Japan, respectively. Both worms were males having bifurcated posterior ends and male gonads in cross sectional specimens. They were identified as Parachordodes sp. (Nematomorpha: Chordodidae) based on the characteristic morphologies of cross sections and areoles in the cuticle. DNA analysis on 18S rRNA partial sequence arrangements was also carried out and both worms were assumed to be close to the genus Paragordionus based on tree analysis, and far from Gordius sp. which has already been reported in humans in Japan. DNA sequencing of the Parachordodes worm does not appear on the database; therefore, more information on the gene sequences of the genus Parachordodes from humans, animals, or intermediates is required.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3347/kjp.2012.50.3.263DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3428576PMC
September 2012

Taxonomic revision of three species of the genus Genarchopsis (Digenea: Hemiuroidea: Derogenidae) in Japan by molecular phylogenetic analyses.

Parasitol Int 2012 Dec 12;61(4):554-60. Epub 2012 May 12.

Department of Ecosystem Studies, School of Environmental Science, The University of Shiga Prefecture, 2500 Hassaka, Hikone, Shiga 522-8533, Japan.

The taxonomic status of three nominal species of Genarchopsis (G. goppo Ozaki, 1925; G. gigi Yamaguti 1939; and G. fellicola Shimazu, 1995) (Digenea: Hemiuroidea: Derogenidae) was investigated by molecular phylogenetic analyses using partial sequences of the genomic ITS-1 region and the mitochondrial COI. The analyzed samples were divided into four groups: Lake Biwa, West Japan, Central Japan and G. fellicola. The Lake Biwa group, a sister taxon to the other three groups, was interpreted as G. gigi, so we concluded that G. gigi is valid; thus, this species is resurrected taxonomically. The specimens from the type host caught near the type locality of G. goppo were included in the West Japan group, so this group was regarded as G. goppo sensu stricto. Because the phylogenetic position of the Central Japan group could not be confirmed, it was identified tentatively as G. goppo, even though this species thus becomes paraphyletic. The taxonomic validity of G. fellicola was reconfirmed. The divergence time of G. gigi is discussed in relation to the geological history of Lake Biwa and the origin of host species.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.parint.2012.05.003DOI Listing
December 2012

Molecular identification of larval bucephalids, Prosorhynchoides ozakii and Parabucephalopsis parasiluri , infecting the golden mussel, Limnoperna fortunei , by PCR-RFLP.

J Parasitol 2012 Jun 26;98(3):669-73. Epub 2011 Dec 26.

Department of Ecosystem Studies, School of Environmental Science, The University of Shiga Prefecture, 2500 Hassaka, Hikone, Shiga, Japan.

A polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) technique was developed for the molecular identification of 2 introduced bucephalid trematodes, Prosorhynchoides ozakii and Parabucephalopsis parasiluri . The method was applied for sporocysts and cercariae obtained from the golden mussel Limnoperna fortunei collected in the Uji River, Japan. The PCR-RFLP method showed that L. fortunei is the intermediate host of both trematode species. The present study thus recognizes the risk of L. fortunei , an invasive molluscan species, as a potential host for pathogenic trematodes.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1645/GE-2837.1DOI Listing
June 2012

Liolope copulans (Trematoda: Digenea: Liolopidae) parasitic in Andrias japonicus (Amphibia: Caudata: Cryptobranchidae) in Japan: Life cycle and systematic position inferred from morphological and molecular evidence.

Parasitol Int 2011 Jun 21;60(2):181-92. Epub 2011 Feb 21.

Department of Ecosystem Studies, School of Environmental Science, The University of Shiga Prefecture, 2500 Hassaka, Hikone, Shiga 522-8533, Japan.

The life cycle of Liolope copulans Cohn, 1902 (Trematoda: Digenea: Liolopidae), an intestinal parasite of the Japanese giant salamander Andrias japonicus (Temminck) (Amphibia: Caudata: Cryptobranchidae), was studied in the field and laboratory in Japan. This is the first description of mother sporocyst, daughter sporocyst and cercariae of a liolopid species. Non-oculate longifurcate pharyngeate cercariae were formed in lanceolate-cylindrical daughter sporocysts in Semisulcospira libertina (Gould) (Gastropoda: Sorbeoconcha: Pleuroceridae). They successfully developed to encapsulated metacercariae in cyprinid fishes, Nipponocypris sieboldii (Temminck and Schlegel) and Rhynchocypris lagowskii (Dybowski), by experimental infection. Cercariae had a V-shaped excretory vesicle with two looped arms, as in metacercariae and adults. Developmental stages from mother sporocyst to adult are described and illustrated. DNA sequencing was conducted for 28S and 18S rDNA of mother and daughter sporocysts, cercariae, and an adult. The result of molecular phylogenetic analysis suggests that L. copulans may be one of the basal taxa of the order Diplostomida Olson, Cribb, Tkach, Bray, and Littlewood, 2003, but its systematic position is still unclear because of the topological inconsistence between the 28S and 18S trees. Therefore, we tentatively place the family Liolopidae in the superfamily Diplostomoidea, mainly based on the morphology of sporocysts and cercariae.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.parint.2011.02.002DOI Listing
June 2011

Morphological comparison of Lophotaspis from freshwater mollusks and turtles in Japan and China, with the correction of original description of Lophotaspis orientalis Faust and Tang, 1936 (Aspidogastrea: Aspidogasteridae).

Authors:
Misako Urabe

Parasitol Int 2009 Sep 18;58(3):255-7. Epub 2009 Apr 18.

Department of Ecosystem Studies, School of Environmental Science, The University of Shiga Prefecture, Hassaka-cho 2500, Hikone, Shiga 522-8533, Japan.

The morphology of a type specimen of Lophotaspis orientalis Faust and Tang, 1936 (Aspidogastrea: Aspidogasteridae) was compared with the morphology of the original description of L. corbiculae Moriya, 1944 and of newly collected specimens from Corbicula species in China and Japan. The original description of L. orientalis was revised by the re-examination of the type specimen. Consequently, some key characteristics of these two species described by Moriya (1944) became invalid. The gonad size of the L. orientalis type specimen was out of the range of all other investigated specimens and past records, suggesting that the L. orientalis type specimen (host: soft-shell turtle) is a different species from the other investigated specimens (host: freshwater clam).
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.parint.2009.04.003DOI Listing
September 2009

Morphological description of two bucephalid trematodes collected from freshwater fishes in the Uji River, Kyoto, Japan.

Parasitol Int 2007 Dec 25;56(4):269-72. Epub 2007 May 25.

Department of Ecosystem Studies, School of Environmental Science, The University of Shiga Prefecture, Hikone, Shiga 522-8533, Japan.

The morphology of two species of bucephalids (Bucephalidae; Digenea; Trematoda), which since 1999 has caused a fish disease at the Uji River, Kyoto Prefecture, Japan, is described. Parabucephalopsis parasiluri Wang, 1985 was first recorded in the Uji River in 2000, and Prosorhynchoides ozakii (Nagaty, 1937) in 2005. The definitive host of both species is the Lake Biwa catfish (Silurus biwaensis), and the second intermediate hosts include many fish species from several families. P. parasiluri is an introduced parasite that invaded with its first intermediate host, golden mussels (Limnoperna fortunei), from the Asian continent. P. ozakii may also be an introduced species, although its first intermediate host has not been identified.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.parint.2007.05.002DOI Listing
December 2007

A new trematode species Neoplagioporus kajika sp. n. (Digenea: Opecoelidae), parasitic in the Japanese fluvial sculpin, Cottus pollux (Osteichthyes: Scorpaeniformes: Cottidae), from Japan.

Folia Parasitol (Praha) 2006 Sep;53(3):208-10

Department of Natural Sciences, Fukuoka University of Education, Akamabunkyo-machi 1-1, Munakata, Fukuoka 811-4192, Japan.

The adult morphology is described and illustrated of Neoplagioporus kajika sp. n. (Digenea: Opecoelidae) found in the Japanese fluvial sculpin Cottus pollux Günther (Osteichthyes: Scorpaeniformes: Cottidae) collected in the Naka River at Terase Bridge, Narutake, Nakagawa Town, Fukuoka Prefecture, Kyushu, Japan. This new species is characterized by that the body shape is oval, that the intestinal caeca end posteriorly at the middle level of the testicular region, that the ovary is trilobed, and that the vitelline follicles are distributed between the pharyngeal level and usually the posterior end of body and fill up the lateral fields of body. The new species is different from three hitherto known Neoplagioporus species, N. zacconis (Yamaguti, 1934) Shimazu, 1990 (type species), N. ayu (Takahashi, 1928) Shimazu, 1990, and N. elongatus (Goto et Ozaki, 1930) Shimazu, 1990, in a combination of these characteristics. The new species is considered mainly infective to C. pollux in the river.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.14411/fp.2006.026DOI Listing
September 2006

Life cycle of Coitocoecum plagiorchis (Trematoda: Digenea: Opecoelidae).

Parasitol Int 2005 Dec;54(4):237-42

Department of Natural Sciences, Fukuoka University of Education, Akamabunkyo-machi 1-1, Munakata, Fukuoka 811-4192, Japan.

The life cycle of Coitocoecum plagiorchis Ozaki, 1926 (Coitocaecum is an incorrect subsequent spelling) was studied in the field and laboratory. The study was conducted at the Futatsu River and the Chikugo River, Kyushu, Japan. Adults of C. plagiorchis were obtained from fishes Coreoperca kawamebari, Rhinogobius spp. and Odontobutis obscura. Cotylomicrocercous cercariae with a two-point stylet (=Cercaria distyloides Faust, 1924) were detected in pleurocerid snails (Semisulcospira spp.). Metacercariae with a cyclocoel were obtained from shrimp (Neocaridina denticulata). The cercariae were experimentally exposed to the shrimp, and subsequently metacercariae with a cyclocoel were recovered from the shrimp within 24 days after exposure. These metacercariae were identified as C. plagiorchis. The sporocysts, cercariae, metacercariae and adults are briefly described.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.parint.2005.06.004DOI Listing
December 2005

Cercariae of a species of Philophthalmus detected in a freshwater snail, Semisulcospira libertina, in Japan.

Authors:
Misako Urabe

Parasitol Int 2005 Mar 12;54(1):55-7. Epub 2005 Jan 12.

Department of Natural Sciences, Fukuoka University of Education, Akamabunkyo-machi 1-1, Munakata, Fukuoka 811-4192, Japan.

Cercariae belonging to the genus Philophthalmus (Digenea: Philophthalmidae) were detected in a freshwater snail Semisulcospira libertina collected from Innai Town, Oita Prefecture, Kyusyu, Japan. This is the first record of the cercaria of this genus from East Asia and from Semisulcospira. Daughter rediae and cercariae are briefly described and morphologically compared with similar but unidentified ones reported from Japan. Cercariae were found encysting on the surface of the bottom of the container and metamorphosed into a flask-like metacercaria characteristic of Philophthalmus.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.parint.2004.10.002DOI Listing
March 2005

Relationship between intermediate host taxon and infection by nematodes of the genus Rhabdochona.

Parasitol Int 2004 Mar;53(1):89-97

Center for Ecological Research, Kyoto University, Otsu, Shiga, Japan.

We describe the intermediate and definitive hosts of the fish nematodes Rhabdochona coronacauda and R. denudata honshuensis and discuss the relationships between parasitism and the feeding habitats of their intermediate hosts. We found that the principal intermediate hosts of the two nematodes were filter-feeding mayflies of the genera Ephemera, Photamanthus and Isonychia. Ephemera strigata seemed to be the most important intermediate host of these nematodes. Adult R. coronacauda were found mainly in Hemibarbus longirostris and Rhinogobius flumineus, which are benthic fishes that feed on benthic aquatic insects, including E. strigata. For R. coronacauda, therefore, the feeding habits of the definitive hosts facilitate host alternation by this species. However, adult R. denudata honshuensis were found in cyprinids. In particular, Zacco temmincki was the principal natural definitive host in our study area. Since Z. temmincki is a swimming predator, E. strigata nymphs that burrow in the substrate are not the main prey of this species. This indicates that the transmission of R. denudata honshuensis hardly occurs from E. strigata nymph to Z. temmincki, suggesting another, unknown transmission route.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.parint.2003.12.001DOI Listing
March 2004

Trematode fauna of prosobranch snails of the genus Semisulcospira in Lake Biwa and the connected drainage system.

Authors:
Misako Urabe

Parasitol Int 2003 Mar;52(1):21-34

Japan Science and Technology Corporation, Aqua Restoration Research Center, Kasada, Kawashima-cho, Hashima-gun, Gifu 501-6021, Japan.

The parasite fauna of prosobranch snails of the genus Semisulcospira was surveyed in Lake Biwa and the adjacent water system. One aspidogastrean and 28 digenetic trematode taxa were detected in 19209 snails consisting of 10 morphological species. There was no trematode species peculiar to members of the subgenus Biwamelania that is endemic to the Lake Biwa water system. However, one species, Notocotylus magniovatus, was found only in the non-endemic subgenus Semisulcospira. Of 23 digenean taxa detected in more than one host, 13 were distributed in both the lake and the tributaries. Seven of these had host taxa, more than 1% of which were infected with the parasite in both the lake and the tributaries, four had such hosts only in the tributaries, and two had no such hosts. Three species detected only in Lake Biwa were previously reported from other rivers in Japan. In the seven species detected only in the tributaries, two species had life cycles that could be maintained only in rivers. These results indicate that the core areas for the distribution of parasites of Semisulcospira are tributaries, and the lake is a sink for these species. These results contradict the expectation that the parasite fauna should be richer in the lake than in tributaries because the lake is a stable habitat over a geological time scale and has more divergent freshwater animals than the adjacent water system.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/s1383-5769(02)00083-1DOI Listing
March 2003
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