Publications by authors named "Mirko Muroni"

11 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Hemoperitoneum during removal of the placenta in advanced abdominal pregnancy with live fetus delivered at 37 weeks of gestation. A case report in a low-resource setting and literature review.

Int J Surg Case Rep 2021 Mar 26;80:105694. Epub 2021 Feb 26.

Mutoyi Hospital, Obstetrics and Gynecology Department, Gitega, Burundi.

Introduction And Importance: Advanced abdominal pregnancy (> 20 weeks gestation) is a rare condition life-threatening for mother and fetus.

Case Presentation: A 31-years-old African woman presented from a rural district to Mutoyi Hospital for first gynecological evaluation after 37 weeks of amenorrhea, abdominal pain and vaginal bleeding. An ultrasound revealed an extra-uterine fetus. Laparotomy was done and a live fetus weighing 1980 g was delivered. Removal of the placenta, triggered massive bleeding (5000 mL) with shock. After re-laparotomy for post-operative ileus and hemoperitoneum, the mother and infant were discharged in good health.

Clinical Discussion: Viable fetus can be delivered after an advanced abdominal pregnancy. Removal of the placenta is controversial. We review currently medical literature on advanced abdominal pregnancy and propose a management of the placenta in these patients.

Conclusion: We recommended to leave the placenta in situ, to avoid intraoperative bleeding. Placenta involution during follow-up can be revealed by ultrasound, colordoppler and β-hCG serum level decrease.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ijscr.2021.105694DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7982487PMC
March 2021

Prophylactic laparoscopic cholecystectomy in adult sickle cell disease patients with cholelithiasis: A prospective cohort study.

Int J Surg 2015 Oct 14;22:62-6. Epub 2015 Aug 14.

Hôpital Tenon, Department of Surgery, 4 rue de la Chine, 75020, Paris, France. Electronic address:

Introduction: Prophylactic laparoscopic cholecystectomy remains controversial and has been discussed for selected subgroups of patients with asymptomatic cholelithiasis who are at high risk of developing complications such as chronic haemolytic conditions. Cholelithiasis is a frequent condition for patients with sickle cell disease (SCD). Complications from cholelithiasis may dramatically increase morbidity for these patients. Our objective was to evaluate the effectiveness of prophylactic cholecystectomy in SCD patients with asymptomatic gallbladder stones.

Methods: From January 2000 to June 2014, we performed 103 laparoscopic cholecystectomies on SCD patients. Fifty-two patients had asymptomatic cholelithiasis. The asymptomatic patients were prospectively enrolled in this study, and all underwent a prophylactic cholecystectomy with an intraoperative cholangiography. The symptomatic patients were retrospectively studied. Upon admission, all patients were administered specific perioperative management including intravenous hydration, antibiotic prophylaxis, oxygenation, and intravenous painkillers, as well as the subcutaneous administration of low-molecular-weight heparin. During the same period, 51 patients with SCD underwent a cholecystectomy for symptomatic cholelithiasis. We compared these 2 groups in terms of postoperative mortality, morbidity, and hospital stay.

Results: There were no postoperative deaths or injuries to the bile ducts in either group. In the asymptomatic group, we observed 6 postoperative complications (11.5%), and in the symptomatic group, there were 13 (25.5%) postoperative complications.

Discussion: Regarding the SCD complications, we observed 1 case (2%) of acute chest syndrome in an asymptomatic cholelithiasis patient, while there were 3 cases (6%) in the symptomatic group. Vaso-occlusive crisis was observed in 1 patient (2%) with asymptomatic cholelithiasis, and in 4 patients (8%) in the other group. The mean hospital stay averaged 5.8 (4-17) days for prophylactic cholecystectomy and 7.96 (4-18) days for the comparative symptomatic group.

Conclusions: Postoperative complications related to SCD were less frequent for asymptomatic patients who had a laparoscopic prophylactic cholecystectomy. This intervention, if performed with perioperative specific management, is safe and helps avoid emergency operations for acute complications including cholecystitis, choledocholithiasis, and cholangitis. For SCD patients, a prophylactic cholecystectomy reduces hospital stays.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ijsu.2015.07.708DOI Listing
October 2015

Abdominal tuberculosis: utility of laparoscopy in the correct diagnosis.

J Gastrointest Surg 2015 May 4;19(5):981-3. Epub 2015 Feb 4.

Department of General Surgery, Hospital Tenon, Paris, France,

Introduction: Abdominal tuberculosis is one of the most prevalent form of extra-pulmonary disease, and the diagnosis is difficult because of non-specific clinical features.

Method: We presented a case of a Tunisian woman with cough, nausea, decreased appetite and pelvic-abdominal pain. CT scan showed peritoneal thickening, peritoneal tiny nodules and enlarged mesenteric lymph nodes ascitic fluid. Sputum analysis was negative. Abdominal paracentesis was performed, and no malignant cell was detected. The Ziehl staining revealed a negativity for acid-fast bacilli.

Results: Diagnostic laparoscopy was performed. Biopsy specimens of peritoneum, liver, omentum and diaphragm showed omental epithelioid granulomas with a centrale caseous necrosis and Langhans giant cells. The patient received anti-tubercular treatment.

Conclusions: In case of suspicion of tuberculosis, when bacteriologic and cytologic analysis is negative, laparoscopy with biopsies is helpful for correct diagnosis and appropriate management.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11605-015-2753-zDOI Listing
May 2015

One-step laparoscopic and endoscopic treatment of gallbladder and common bile duct stones: our experience of the last 9 years in a retrospective study.

Am Surg 2013 Dec;79(12):1243-7

Department of General Surgery, Regina Apostolorum Hospital, Rome, Italy.

The optimal timing and best method for removal of common bile duct stones (CBDS) associated with gallbladder stones (GBS) is still controversial. The aim of this study is to investigate the outcomes of a single-step procedure combining laparoscopic cholecystectomy (LC), intraoperative cholangiography (IOC), and endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP). Between January 2003 and January 2012, 1972 patients underwent cholecystectomy at our hospital. Of those, 162 patients (8.2%; male/female 72/90) presented with GBS and suspected CBDS. We treated 54 cases (Group 1) with ERCP and LC within 48 to 72 hours. In 108 patients (Group 2) we performed LC with IOC and, if positive, was associated with IO-ERCP and sphincterotomy. In Group 1, a preoperative ERCP and LC were completed in 50 patients (30%). In four cases (2%), an ERCP and endobiliary stents were performed without cholecystectomy and then patients were discharged because of the severity of clinical conditions and advanced American Society of Anesthesiologists score (III to IV). Two months later a preoperative ERCP and removal of biliary stents were performed followed by LC 48 to 72 hours later. In Group 2, the IOC was performed in all cases and CBDS were extracted in 94 patients (87%). In two cases, the laparoscopic choledochotomy was necessary to remove large stones. In another two cases, an open choledochotomy was performed to remove safely the stones with T-tube drainage. In three cases, conversion was necessary to safely complete the procedure. The mean operative time was 95 minutes (range, 45 to 150 minutes) in Group 1 and 130 minutes (range, 50 to 300 minutes) in Group 2. The mean hospital stay was 6.5 days (range, 4 to 21 days) in Group 1 and 4.7 days (range, 3 to 14 days) in Group 2. Five cases (two in Group 2 and three in Group 1) presented with CBDS at 12 to 18 months after surgery. They were treated successfully with a second ERCP. There was no perioperative mortality. Our experience suggests that when clinically and technically feasible, a single-stage approach combining LC, IOC, and ERCP to the patients diagnosed with chole-choledocholithiasis is indicated. The IO-ERCP with CBDS extraction is a safe and effective method with low risk of postoperative pancreatitis. One-step treatment is more comfortable for the patient and also reduces the mean hospital stay.
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December 2013

Pancreas-preserving segmental duodenectomy for gastrointestinal stromal tumor of the duodenum and splenectomy for splenic angiosarcoma.

Hepatobiliary Pancreat Dis Int 2012 Jun;11(3):325-9

Department of General Surgery, La Sapienza University of Rome, Rome, Italy.

Background: Gastrointestinal stromal tumors are the most common mesenchymal tumors of the gastrointestinal tract and occur rarely in the duodenum. Splenic angiosarcoma is an aggressive neoplasm with an extremely poor prognosis.

Methods: We report a case of a 70-year-old man hospitalized for abdominal pain in the upper quadrants, dyspepsia and nausea, previously treated for Hodgkin lymphoma 30 years ago. Abdominal CT showed a solid nodular lesion in the third portion of the duodenum, the presence of retropancreatic, aortic and caval lymph nodes, and four nodular splenic masses. (111)In-octreotide scintigraphy revealed pathological tissue accumulation in the duodenal region, and in the retropancreatic, retroduodenal, aortic and caval lymph nodes, suggesting a nonfunctioning neuroendocrine peripancreatic tumor.

Results: At exploratory laparotomy, an exophytic soft tumor was found originating from the third portion of the duodenum. Pancreas-preserving duodenectomy with duodenojejunostomy, splenectomy and lymphnodectomy of retropancreatic aortic and caval lymph nodes were performed. Pathological evaluation and immunohistochemical studies showed the presence of a duodenal gastrointestinal stromal tumor with low mitotic activity and a well-differentiated angiosarcoma localized to the spleen and invading lymph nodes.

Conclusions: We speculated that the angiosarcoma and duodenal gastrointestinal stromal tumors of this patient were due to the treatment of Hodgkin lymphoma with radiotherapy 30 years ago. Pancreas-preserving segmental duodenectomy can be used to treat non-malignant neoplasms of the duodenum and avoid extensive surgery. Splenectomy is the treatment of choice for localized angiosarcomas but a strict follow-up is mandatory because of the possibility of recurrence.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/s1499-3872(12)60169-6DOI Listing
June 2012

Malignant solitary fibrous tumor originating from the mesentery.

Gastroenterology 2012 Jan 19;142(1):12-3, 187-8. Epub 2011 Nov 19.

Department of General Surgery, La Sapienza University of Rome, Second School of Medicine, St. Andrea Hospital, Rome, Italy.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1053/j.gastro.2010.12.047DOI Listing
January 2012

An unusual case of exclusive liver metastases from adenoid cystic carcinoma of the submandibular gland: a role for surgery? Report of a case.

Surg Today 2011 Apr 23;41(4):596-9. Epub 2011 Mar 23.

Department of General Surgery, II School of Medicine, Sapienza University of Rome, Sant'Andrea Hospital, Via di Grottarossa, Rome, Italy.

Adenoid cystic carcinoma (ACC) is a relatively rare tumor of the salivary glands, accounting for approximately 5%-10% of all salivary gland tumors. An important feature of ACCs is the long clinical course with a high rate of distant metastases, with an incidence of more than 40% for ACC of submandibular glands. The preferential sites of metastases are the lung and bone, followed by the brain and liver. Most liver metastases are derived from nonparotid ACCs, and the presentation is often related to local recurrence or metastases to other organs. We herein report the case of a patient with liver metastases treated by a hepatectomy, which occurred 18 months after the primary resection of an ACC of the submandibular gland. We furthermore review the literature concerning the management of these tumors.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00595-010-4318-9DOI Listing
April 2011

Risk factors of pancreatic fistula after pancreaticoduodenectomy: a collective review.

Am Surg 2011 Mar;77(3):257-69

University ''Sapienza,'' II Faculty of Medicine, Hospital ''Sant'Andrea,'' Rome, Italy.

Postoperative pancreatic fistula (POPF) is the most frequent complication after pancreaticoduodenectomy, results in increased morbidity and mortality, and adversely affects length of stay and costs. Reported rates of postoperative pancreatic fistula vary from 0 per cent up to more than 30 per cent. Plenty of randomized trails and meta-analysis were published to analyze the ideal procedure, technique of anastomosis, and perioperative management of patients undergoing pancreaticoduodenectomy; however, results are often discordant and clear evidence on the ideal management and surgical technique to reduce POPF rate is not yet provided. This collective review examined the current evidence about risk factors contributing to postoperative pancreatic fistula and delineates methods of diagnosis and treatment of this universally dreaded complication.
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March 2011

Diaphragmatic rupture with right colon and small intestine herniation after blunt trauma: a case report.

J Med Case Rep 2010 Aug 24;4:289. Epub 2010 Aug 24.

Department of General Surgery, La Sapienza University of Rome, Second School of Medicine, St, Andrea Hospital, via di Grottarossa 1035, 00189 Rome, Italy.

Introduction: Traumatic diaphragmatic hernias are an unusual presentation of trauma, and are observed in about 10% of diaphragmatic injuries. The diagnosis is often missed because of non-specific clinical signs, and the absence of additional intra-abdominal and thoracic injuries.

Case Presentation: We report a case of a 59-year-old Italian man hospitalized for abdominal pain and vomiting. His medical history included a blunt trauma seven years previously. A chest X-ray showed right diaphragm elevation, and computed tomography revealed that the greater omentum, a portion of the colon and the small intestine had been transposed in the hemithorax through a diaphragm rupture. The patient underwent laparotomy, at which time the colon and small intestine were reduced back into the abdomen and the diaphragm was repaired.

Conclusions: This was a unusual case of traumatic right-sided diaphragmatic hernia. Diaphragmatic ruptures may be revealed many years after the initial trauma. The suspicion of diaphragmatic rupture in a patient with multiple traumas contributes to early diagnosis. Surgical repair remains the only curative treatment for diaphragmatic hernias. Prosthetic patches may be a good solution when the diaphragmatic defect is severe and too large for primary closure, whereas primary repair remains the gold standard for the closure of small to moderate sized diaphragmatic defects.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/1752-1947-4-289DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2936927PMC
August 2010

Synchronous gastric adenocarcinoma and pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma.

Hepatobiliary Pancreat Dis Int 2010 Feb;9(1):97-9

Department of General Surgery, La Sapienza University of Rome, St. Andrea Hospital, viale Gino Cervi 53 L, 00139, Rome, Italy.

Background: The association between gastric and pancreatic carcinoma is a relatively rare condition. In gastric carcinoma patients, the prevalence of second tumors varies 2.8% to 6.8% according to the reported statistics. Gastric cancer associated with pancreatic cancer is uncommon.

Methods: We report a case of a 73-year-old patient hospitalized for vomiting and weight loss. Esophagogastroduodenoscopy demonstrated an ulcerative lesion of the gastric antrum. Computed tomography and magnetic resonance showed a gastric thickening in the antral and pyloric portion and a nodular mass (3 X 1.7 cm) in the uncinate portion of the pancreas.

Results: The patient underwent pancreaticoduodenectomy according to Whipple regional type I Fortner. Histological examination of the specimen demonstrated a moderately differentiated adenocarcinoma of the stomach and a poorly differentiated ductal adenocarcinoma of the pancreas.

Conclusions: Long survival is rare in patients with associated gastric and pancreatic cancer. Surgical resection remains the only potentially curative treatment.
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February 2010

[Adult ileocaecal and colic invagination: a case report].

Chir Ital 2008 Sep-Oct;60(5):749-53

Chirurgia Generale, Ospedale Sant'Andrea, II Facoltà di Medicina e Chirurgia, Università degli Studi di Roma Sapienza, Roma.

Intestinal invagination or intussusception is the telescoping of a segment of the intestinal tract into an adjacent one. In most cases the invagination is ileocolic, consisting of the small intestine penetrating into the colon through the ileocaecal valve; in other cases it could be ileoileal or colocolic. It is a common entity in paediatric subjects, especially in the first two years of life (90-95% of cases), but is a rare condition in the adult where it accounts for only 5-10% of all intestinal invaginations and around 1% of all intestinal occlusions. We report a case observed in a 65-year-old patient. The patient underwent ileo-caeco-colic resection. Histological examination of the specimen showed an ulcerated submucosal intestinal lipoma. Computed tomography is the most accurate imaging technique for intestinal invagination. The recommended treatment of adult intestinal invagination is surgical resection of the intestinal segments involved.
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February 2009
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