Publications by authors named "Miriam S Kuth"

4 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Structure, Assembly, and Function of Tripartite Efflux and Type 1 Secretion Systems in Gram-Negative Bacteria.

Chem Rev 2021 May 28;121(9):5479-5596. Epub 2021 Apr 28.

School of Life Sciences, University of Essex, Colchester, CO4 3SQ United Kingdom.

Tripartite efflux pumps and the related type 1 secretion systems (T1SSs) in Gram-negative organisms are diverse in function, energization, and structural organization. They form continuous conduits spanning both the inner and the outer membrane and are composed of three principal components-the energized inner membrane transporters (belonging to ABC, RND, and MFS families), the outer membrane factor channel-like proteins, and linking the two, the periplasmic adaptor proteins (PAPs), also known as the membrane fusion proteins (MFPs). In this review we summarize the recent advances in understanding of structural biology, function, and regulation of these systems, highlighting the previously undescribed role of PAPs in providing a common architectural scaffold across diverse families of transporters. Despite being built from a limited number of basic structural domains, these complexes present a staggering variety of architectures. While key insights have been derived from the RND transporter systems, a closer inspection of the operation and structural organization of different tripartite systems reveals unexpected analogies between them, including those formed around MFS- and ATP-driven transporters, suggesting that they operate around basic common principles. Based on that we are proposing a new integrated model of PAP-mediated communication within the conformational cycling of tripartite systems, which could be expanded to other types of assemblies.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1021/acs.chemrev.1c00055DOI Listing
May 2021

Nox4-dependent upregulation of S100A4 after peripheral nerve injury modulates neuropathic pain processing.

Free Radic Biol Med 2021 May 28;168:155-167. Epub 2021 Mar 28.

Institute of Pharmacology and Clinical Pharmacy, Goethe University, 60438 Frankfurt am Main, Germany. Electronic address:

Previous studies suggested that reactive oxygen species (ROS) produced by NADPH oxidase 4 (Nox4) affect the processing of neuropathic pain. However, mechanisms underlying Nox4-dependent pain signaling are incompletely understood. In this study, we aimed to identify novel Nox4 downstream interactors in the nociceptive system. Mice lacking Nox4 specifically in sensory neurons were generated by crossing Advillin-Cre mice with Nox4 mice. Tissue-specific deletion of Nox4 in sensory neurons considerably reduced mechanical hypersensitivity and neuronal action potential firing after peripheral nerve injury. Using a proteomic approach, we detected various proteins that are regulated in a Nox4-dependent manner after injury, including the small calcium-binding protein S100A4. Immunofluorescence staining and Western blot experiments confirmed that S100A4 expression is massively up-regulated in peripheral nerves and dorsal root ganglia after injury. Furthermore, mice lacking S100A4 showed increased mechanical hypersensitivity after peripheral nerve injury and after delivery of a ROS donor. Our findings suggest that S100A4 expression is up-regulated after peripheral nerve injury in a Nox4-dependent manner and that deletion of S100A4 leads to an increased neuropathic pain hypersensitivity.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.freeradbiomed.2021.03.021DOI Listing
May 2021

Neuropathic and cAMP-induced pain behavior is ameliorated in mice lacking CNGB1.

Neuropharmacology 2020 07 6;171:108087. Epub 2020 Apr 6.

Institute of Pharmacology and Clinical Pharmacy, Goethe University, 60438, Frankfurt am Main, Germany.

Cyclic nucleotide-gated (CNG) channels, which are directly activated by cAMP and cGMP, have long been known to play a key role in retinal and olfactory signal transduction. Emerging evidence indicates that CNG channels are also involved in signaling pathways important for pain processing. Here, we found that the expression of the channel subunits CNGA2, CNGA3, CNGA4 and CNGB1 in dorsal root ganglia, and of CNGA2 in the spinal cord, is transiently altered after peripheral nerve injury in mice. Specifically, we show using in situ hybridization and quantitative real-time RT-PCR that CNG channels containing the CNGB1b subunit are localized to populations of sensory neurons and predominantly excitatory interneurons in the spinal dorsal horn. In CNGB1 knockout (CNGB1) mice, neuropathic pain behavior is considerably attenuated whereas inflammatory pain behavior is normal. Finally, we provide evidence to support CNGB1 as a downstream mediator of cAMP signaling in pain pathways. Altogether, our data suggest that CNGB1-positive CNG channels specifically contribute to neuropathic pain processing after peripheral nerve injury.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.neuropharm.2020.108087DOI Listing
July 2020

AcrB: a mean, keen, drug efflux machine.

Ann N Y Acad Sci 2020 01 6;1459(1):38-68. Epub 2019 Oct 6.

Institute of Biochemistry, Goethe-University Frankfurt, Frankfurt am Main, Germany.

Gram-negative bacteria are intrinsically resistant against cytotoxic substances by means of their outer membrane and a network of multidrug efflux systems, acting in synergy. Efflux pumps from various superfamilies with broad substrate preferences sequester and pump drugs across the inner membrane to supply the highly polyspecific and powerful tripartite resistance-nodulation-cell division (RND) efflux pumps with compounds to be extruded across the outer membrane barrier. In Escherichia coli, the tripartite efflux system AcrAB-TolC is the archetype RND multiple drug efflux pump complex. The homotrimeric inner membrane component acriflavine resistance B (AcrB) is the drug specificity and energy transduction center for the drug/proton antiport process. Drugs are bound and expelled via a cycle of mainly three consecutive states in every protomer, constituting a flexible alternating access channel system. This review recapitulates the molecular basis of drug and inhibitor binding, including mechanistic insights into drug efflux by AcrB. It also summarizes 17 years of mutational analysis of the gene acrB, reporting the effect of every substitution on the ability of E. coli to confer resistance toward antibiotics (http://goethe.link/AcrBsubstitutions). We emphasize the functional robustness of AcrB toward single-site substitutions and highlight regions that are more sensitive to perturbation.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/nyas.14239DOI Listing
January 2020