Publications by authors named "Miriam L Karsten"

3 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

The clinical grade maturation cocktail monophosphoryl lipid A plus IFNgamma generates monocyte-derived dendritic cells with the capacity to migrate and induce Th1 polarization.

Vaccine 2007 Oct 6;25(41):7145-52. Epub 2007 Aug 6.

Department of Immunopathology, Sanquin Research at CLB and Landsteiner Laboratory, Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam, The Netherlands.

Ex vivo generated monocyte-derived dendritic cells (DCs) are used as a cellular vaccine against cancer in clinical trials. In order to be able to induce an efficient tumour-specific CTL response during immunotherapy, DCs have to be able to migrate to the lymph node and produce the Th1 polarizing cytokine, IL-12p70, upon encounter of T cells in the lymph node. However, most clinically used DCs do not produce IL-12p70 upon T cell contact. In this study, we compared a newly developed clinical grade DC maturation cocktail consisting of MPLA and IFNgamma with two clinically available maturation cocktails, the 'gold standard' (TNFalpha, IL-1beta, IL-6 and PGE(2)) and the 'alpha type 1 polarizing' (TNFalpha, IL-1beta, IFNalpha, IFNgamma and pI:C) cocktail. All three cocktails induced phenotypically mature DCs. However, in contrast to 'gold standard' DCs, which produce no IL-12p70 and as a result induce mainly Th2 cells, DCs matured with MPLA and IFNgamma produce high levels of IL-12p70 upon CD40 triggering. Subsequently, these DCs induce mainly Th1 cells in vitro, even slightly more than by the alpha type 1 polarized DCs. In addition, MPLA plus IFNgamma matured DCs have an intermediate migratory capacity towards CCL21. In conclusion, we here present MPLA plus IFNgamma as a simple clinical grade maturation cocktail to generate immunostimulatory DCs with superior capacity to induce type 1 immunity.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.vaccine.2007.07.031DOI Listing
October 2007

Generation of dendritic cells for immunotherapy is minimally impaired by granulocytes in the monocyte preparation.

Immunobiology 2006 5;211(6-8):633-40. Epub 2006 Jul 5.

Department of Immunopathology, Sanquin Research at CLB and Landsteiner Laboratory, Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam, The Netherlands.

The growing number of clinical studies, using monocyte-derived DC therapy, requires protocols where a sufficient number of dendritic cell (DCs) are produced according to current Good Manufacturing Practice guidelines. Therefore, a closed culture system for the generation of DCs is inevitable. One cost-effective way to isolate monocytes directly from leukapheresis material in a closed system is by elutriation with the Elutra cell separation system. In the Elutra, granulocytes co-purify with the monocytes. Therefore, we studied if and to what extent the presence of granulocytes in a monocyte product affects the generation of mature DCs. The presence of up to 16% granulocytes in the monocyte product had no significant effects on the quality of the DCs formed. The presence of higher granulocyte percentages, however, gradually altered DC quality. In this respect, the presence of higher number of granulocytes induced significant lower migratory capacity of the DCs and lower expression levels of CD80, CD40 and CD86. No effects were observed on the DC yield, cytokine production or the stimulatory capacity of the DCs in MLR. In conclusion, the presence of 20-30% granulocytes in a monocyte product has no major influence on the quality of the DCs generated from monocytes. Therefore, the Elutra is a suitable closed system apparatus to separate monocytes from other blood components for the generation of DCs, even from leukapheresis material which contains a high number of granulocytes.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.imbio.2006.05.012DOI Listing
December 2006

4-Hydroxy-oxyphenbutazone is a potent inhibitor of cytokine production.

Eur Cytokine Netw 2005 Jun;16(2):144-51

Department of Immunopathology, Sanquin Research at CLB, PO.BOX 9190, 1006 AD Amsterdam, The Netherlands.

4-Hydroxy-oxyphenbutazone (4OH-OPB), is currently in phase II trials for its immunosuppressive effect in patients with rheumatoid arthritis. 4OH-OPB and other compounds related to phenylbutazone were tested for their effect on in vitro cytokine production by monocytes and lymphocytes present in peripheral mononuclear cells (PBMC) or whole blood (WB) cultures, and compared against phenylbutazone and oxyphenbutazone, two known anti-inflammatory drugs. In PBMC cultures, 4OH-OPB was by far the most potent inhibitor, and both monokines and Th1 and Th2 lymphokines were efficiently inhibited at low concentrations. In WB cultures, 4OH-OPB was less effective than in PBMC cultures, but was still the best inhibitor of lymphokine production and, furthermore, was the only inhibitor of monokine production. The increase in 4OH-OPB concentration needed to induce the same inhibition of cytokine production in WB as in PBMC culture could be mimicked by the addition of erythrocytes to the PBMC cultures. Experiments with radioactively-labeled 4OH-OPB suggest that 4OH-OPB is taken up very rapidly into erythrocytes and is secreted by the erythrocytes with much slower kinetics via a multidrug-resistance-associated protein. The secreted compound is most likely structurally different from 4OH-OPB, as in PBMC and WB cultures, the inhibition of cytokine production seems to be caused by a different mechanism. In PBMC cultures, the inhibition of cytokine production is accompanied by a loss of cell viability, while this is not the case when 4OH-OPB inhibits cytokine production in WB. Our data suggest that 4OH-OPB may be useful as an immunosuppressive drug for patients with inflammatory diseases.
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June 2005
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