Publications by authors named "Miquel Baquero"

9 Publications

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Common variants in Alzheimer's disease and risk stratification by polygenic risk scores.

Nat Commun 2021 06 7;12(1):3417. Epub 2021 Jun 7.

Servei de Neurologia, Hospital Universitari i Politècnic La Fe, Valencia, Spain.

Genetic discoveries of Alzheimer's disease are the drivers of our understanding, and together with polygenetic risk stratification can contribute towards planning of feasible and efficient preventive and curative clinical trials. We first perform a large genetic association study by merging all available case-control datasets and by-proxy study results (discovery n = 409,435 and validation size n = 58,190). Here, we add six variants associated with Alzheimer's disease risk (near APP, CHRNE, PRKD3/NDUFAF7, PLCG2 and two exonic variants in the SHARPIN gene). Assessment of the polygenic risk score and stratifying by APOE reveal a 4 to 5.5 years difference in median age at onset of Alzheimer's disease patients in APOE ɛ4 carriers. Because of this study, the underlying mechanisms of APP can be studied to refine the amyloid cascade and the polygenic risk score provides a tool to select individuals at high risk of Alzheimer's disease.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41467-021-22491-8DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8184987PMC
June 2021

Relevance of the interplay between amyloid and tau for cognitive impairment in early Alzheimer's disease.

Neurobiol Aging 2019 07 1;79:131-141. Epub 2019 Apr 1.

Janssen Research and Development, A Division of Janssen Pharmaceutica N.V., Beerse, Belgium; Reference Center for Biological Markers of Dementia (BIODEM), Institute Born-Bunge, University of Antwerp, Antwerp, Belgium.

Amyloid β (Aβ) and tau are key hallmark features of Alzheimer's disease (AD) neuropathology. The interplay of Aβ and tau for cognitive impairment in early AD was examined with cross-sectional analysis, measured by cerebrospinal fluid biomarkers (Aβ, total tau [t-tau], and phosphorylated tau [p-tau181P]), and on cognitive performance by the repeatable battery for assessment of neuropsychological status (RBANS). Participants (n = 246) included cognitively normal (Aβ-), mild cognitively impaired (Aβ-), preclinical AD (Aβ+), and prodromal AD (Aβ+). Overall, cognitive scores (RBANS total scale score) had a moderate negative correlation to t-tau (n = 246; r = -0.434; p < 0.001) and p-tau181P (r = -0.389; p < 0.001). When classified by Aβ status, this correlation to t-tau was applicable only in Aβ+ participants (n = 139; r = -0.451, p < 0.001) but not Aβ- participants (n = 107; r = 0.137, p = 0.16), with identical findings for p-tau. Both tau (p < 0.0001) and interaction of Aβ with tau (p = 0.006) affected RBANS, but not Aβ alone. Cognitive/memory performance correlated well with cerebrospinal fluid tau levels across early stages of AD, although the correlation is Aβ dependent.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.neurobiolaging.2019.03.016DOI Listing
July 2019

Pharmacodynamics of atabecestat (JNJ-54861911), an oral BACE1 inhibitor in patients with early Alzheimer's disease: randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study.

Alzheimers Res Ther 2018 08 23;10(1):85. Epub 2018 Aug 23.

Reference Center for Biological Markers of Dementia (BIODEM), Institute Born-Bunge, University of Antwerp, Antwerp, Belgium.

Background: β-Secretase enzyme (BACE) inhibition has been proposed as a priority treatment mechanism for Alzheimer's disease (AD), but treatment initiation may need to be very early. We present proof of mechanism of atabecestat (also known as JNJ-54861911), an oral BACE inhibitor for the treatment of AD, in Caucasian and Japanese populations with early AD who do not show signs of dementia.

Methods: In two similarly designed phase I studies, a sample of amyloid-positive elderly patients comprising 45 Caucasian patients with early AD diagnosed as preclinical AD (n = 15, Clinical Dementia Rating [CDR] = 0) or with mild cognitive impairment due to AD (n = 30, CDR = 0.5) and 18 Japanese patients diagnosed as preclinical AD (CDR-J = 0) were randomized 1:1:1 to atabecestat 10 or 50 mg or placebo (n = 6-8/treatment) daily for 4 weeks. Safety, pharmacokinetics (PK), and pharmacodynamics (PD) (i.e., reduction of cerebrospinal fluid [CSF] amyloid beta 1-40 [Aβ] levels [primary endpoint] and effect on other AD biomarkers) of atabecestat were evaluated.

Results: In both populations, atabecestat was well tolerated and characterized by linear PK and high central nervous system penetrance of unbound drug. Atabecestat significantly reduced CSF Aβ levels from baseline at day 28 in both the 10-mg (67-68%) and 50-mg (87-90%) dose groups compared with placebo. For Caucasians with early AD, the least squares mean differences (95% CI) were - 69.37 (- 72.25; - 61.50) and - 92.74 (- 100.08; - 85.39), and for Japanese with preclinical AD, they were - 62.48 (- 78.32; - 46.64) and - 80.81 (- 96.13; - 65.49), respectively. PK/PD model simulations confirmed that once-daily 10 mg and 50 mg atabecestat can attain 60-70% and 90% Aβ reductions, respectively. The trend of the reduction was similar across the Aβ, Aβ, and Aβ fragments in both atabecestat dose groups, consistent with Aβ. CSF amyloid precursor protein fragment (sAPPβ) levels declined from baseline, regardless of patient population, whereas CSF sAPPα levels increased compared with placebo. There were no relevant changes in either CSF total tau or phosphorylated tau 181P over a 4-week treatment period.

Conclusions: JNJ-54861911 at 10 and 50 mg daily doses after 4 weeks resulted in mean CSF Aβ reductions of 67% and up to 90% in both Caucasian and Japanese patients with early stage AD, confirming results in healthy elderly adults.

Trial Registration: ALZ1005: ClinicalTrials.gov, NCT01978548. Registered on 7 November 2013. ALZ1008: ClinicalTrials.gov, NCT02360657. Registered on 10 February 2015.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s13195-018-0415-6DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6106931PMC
August 2018

Mild Developmental Foreign Accent Syndrome and Psychiatric Comorbidity: Altered White Matter Integrity in Speech and Emotion Regulation Networks.

Front Hum Neurosci 2016 9;10:399. Epub 2016 Aug 9.

Cognitive Neurology and Aphasia Unit and Cathedra ARPA of Aphasia, Centro de Investigaciones Médico-Sanitarias, Instituto de Investigación Biomédica de Málaga (IBIMA), University of MalagaMalaga, Spain; Department of Psychobiology and Methodology of Behavioural Sciences, Faculty of Psychology, University of MalagaMalaga, Spain.

Foreign accent syndrome (FAS) is a speech disorder that is defined by the emergence of a peculiar manner of articulation and intonation which is perceived as foreign. In most cases of acquired FAS (AFAS) the new accent is secondary to small focal lesions involving components of the bilaterally distributed neural network for speech production. In the past few years FAS has also been described in different psychiatric conditions (conversion disorder, bipolar disorder, and schizophrenia) as well as in developmental disorders (specific language impairment, apraxia of speech). In the present study, two adult males, one with atypical phonetic production and the other one with cluttering, reported having developmental FAS (DFAS) since their adolescence. Perceptual analysis by naïve judges could not confirm the presence of foreign accent, possibly due to the mildness of the speech disorder. However, detailed linguistic analysis provided evidence of prosodic and segmental errors previously reported in AFAS cases. Cognitive testing showed reduced communication in activities of daily living and mild deficits related to psychiatric disorders. Psychiatric evaluation revealed long-lasting internalizing disorders (neuroticism, anxiety, obsessive-compulsive disorder, social phobia, depression, alexithymia, hopelessness, and apathy) in both subjects. Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) data from each subject with DFAS were compared with data from a group of 21 age- and gender-matched healthy control subjects. Diffusion parameters (MD, AD, and RD) in predefined regions of interest showed changes of white matter microstructure in regions previously related with AFAS and psychiatric disorders. In conclusion, the present findings militate against the possibility that these two subjects have FAS of psychogenic origin. Rather, our findings provide evidence that mild DFAS occurring in the context of subtle, yet persistent, developmental speech disorders may be associated with structural brain anomalies. We suggest that the simultaneous involvement of speech and emotion regulation networks might result from disrupted neural organization during development, or compensatory or maladaptive plasticity. Future studies are required to examine whether the interplay between biological trait-like diathesis (shyness, neuroticism) and the stressful experience of living with mild DFAS lead to the development of internalizing psychiatric disorders.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3389/fnhum.2016.00399DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4977429PMC
August 2016

Assessing the role of TUBA4A gene in frontotemporal degeneration.

Neurobiol Aging 2016 Feb 5;38:215.e13-215.e14. Epub 2015 Nov 5.

Memory Unit, Neurology Department and Sant Pau Biomedical Research Institute, Hospital de la Santa Creu i Sant Pau, Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona, Barcelona, Spain; CIBERNED, Center for Networked Biomedical Research into Neurodegenerative Diseases, Madrid, Spain. Electronic address:

The tubulin alpha 4a (TUBA4A) gene has been recently associated with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. Interestingly, some of the mutation carriers were also diagnosed with frontotemporal degeneration (FTD) or mild cognitive impairment. With the aim to investigate the role of TUBA4A in FTD, we screened TUBA4A in a series of 814 FTD patients from Spain. Our data did not disclose any nonsense or missense variant in the cohort, thus suggesting that TUBA4A mutations are not associated with FTD.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.neurobiolaging.2015.10.030DOI Listing
February 2016

Depressive symptoms in neurodegenerative diseases.

World J Clin Cases 2015 Aug;3(8):682-93

Miquel Baquero, Nuria Martín, Servei de Neurologia, Hospital Universitari i Politècnic La Fe, 46026 Valencia, Spain.

Depressive symptoms are very common in chronic conditions. This is true so for neurodegenerative diseases. A number of patients with cognitive decline and dementia due to Alzheimer's disease and related conditions like Parkinson's disease, Lewy body disease, vascular dementia, frontotemporal degeneration amongst other entities, experience depressive symptoms in greater or lesser grade at some point during the course of the illness. Depressive symptoms have a particular significance in neurological disorders, specially in neurodegenerative diseases, because brain, mind, behavior and mood relationship. A number of patients may develop depressive symptoms in early stages of the neurologic disease, occurring without clear presence of cognitive decline with only mild cognitive deterioration. Classically, depression constitutes a reliable diagnostic challenge in this setting. However, actually we can recognize and evaluate depressive, cognitive or motor symptoms of neurodegenerative disease in order to establish their clinical significance and to plan some therapeutic strategies. Depressive symptoms can appear also lately, when the neurodegenerative disease is fully developed. The presence of depression and other neuropsychiatric symptoms have a negative impact on the quality-of-life of patients and caregivers. Besides, patients with depressive symptoms also tend to further decrease function and reduce cognitive abilities and also uses to present more affected clinical status, compared with patients without depression. Depressive symptoms are treatable. Early detection of depressive symptoms is very important in patients with neurodegenerative disorders, in order to initiate the most adequate treatment. We review in this paper the main neurodegenerative diseases, focusing in depressive symptoms of each other entities and current recommendations of management and treatment.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.12998/wjcc.v3.i8.682DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4539408PMC
August 2015

Rare variants in calcium homeostasis modulator 1 (CALHM1) found in early onset Alzheimer's disease patients alter calcium homeostasis.

PLoS One 2013 17;8(9):e74203. Epub 2013 Sep 17.

Laboratory of Molecular Physiology and Channelopathies, Department of Experimental and Health Sciences, University Pompeu Fabra, Barcelona, Spain.

Calcium signaling in the brain is fundamental to the learning and memory process and there is evidence to suggest that its dysfunction is involved in the pathological pathways underlying Alzheimer's disease (AD). Recently, the calcium hypothesis of AD has received support with the identification of the non-selective Ca(2+)-permeable channel CALHM1. A genetic polymorphism (p. P86L) in CALHM1 reduces plasma membrane Ca(2+) permeability and is associated with an earlier age-at-onset of AD. To investigate the role of CALHM1 variants in early-onset AD (EOAD), we sequenced all CALHM1 coding regions in three independent series comprising 284 EOAD patients and 326 controls. Two missense mutations in patients (p.G330D and p.R154H) and one (p.A213T) in a control individual were identified. Calcium imaging analyses revealed that while the mutation found in a control (p.A213T) behaved as wild-type CALHM1 (CALHM1-WT), a complete abolishment of the Ca(2+) influx was associated with the mutations found in EOAD patients (p.G330D and p.R154H). Notably, the previously reported p. P86L mutation was associated with an intermediate Ca(2+) influx between the CALHM1-WT and the p.G330D and p.R154H mutations. Since neither expression of wild-type nor mutant CALHM1 affected amyloid ß-peptide (Aß) production or Aß-mediated cellular toxicity, we conclude that rare genetic variants in CALHM1 lead to Ca(2+) dysregulation and may contribute to the risk of EOAD through a mechanism independent from the classical Aß cascade.
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http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0074203PLOS
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3775809PMC
May 2014

Assessing the role of the TREM2 p.R47H variant as a risk factor for Alzheimer's disease and frontotemporal dementia.

Neurobiol Aging 2014 Feb 13;35(2):444.e1-4. Epub 2013 Sep 13.

Alzheimer Research Center and Memory Clinic, Fundació ACE, Institut Català de Neurociències Aplicades, Barcelona, Spain.

A non-synonymous genetic rare variant, rs75932628-T (p.R47H), in the TREM2 gene has recently been reported to be a strong genetic risk factor for Alzheimer's disease (AD). Also, rare recessive mutations have been associated with frontotemporal dementia (FTD). We aimed to investigate the role of p.R47H variant in AD and FTD through a multi-center study comprising 3172 AD and 682 FTD patients and 2169 healthy controls from Spain. We found that 0.6% of AD patients carried this variant compared to 0.1% of controls (odds ratio [OR] = 4.12, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.21-14.00, p = 0.014). A meta-analysis comprising 32,598 subjects from 4 previous studies demonstrated the large effect of the p.R47H variant in AD risk (OR = 4.11, 95% CI = 2.99-5.68, p = 5.27×10(-18)). We did not find an association between p.R47H and age of onset of AD or family history of dementia. Finally, none of the FTD patients harbored this genetic variant. These data strongly support the important role of p.R47H in AD risk, and suggest that this rare genetic variant is not related to FTD.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.neurobiolaging.2013.08.011DOI Listing
February 2014

Genetic screening of Alzheimer's disease genes in Iberian and African samples yields novel mutations in presenilins and APP.

Neurobiol Aging 2010 May 30;31(5):725-31. Epub 2008 Jul 30.

Laboratory of Neurogenetics, National Institute on Aging, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD, USA.

Mutations in three genes (PSEN1, PSEN2, and APP) have been identified in patients with early-onset (<65 years) Alzheimer's disease (AD). We performed a screening for mutations in the coding regions of presenilins, as well as exons 16 and 17 of the APP gene in a total of 231 patients from the Iberian peninsular with a clinical diagnosis of early-onset AD (mean age at onset of 52.9 years; range 31-64). We found three novel mutations in PSEN1, one novel mutation in PSEN2, and a novel mutation in the APP gene. Four previously described mutations in PSEN1 were also found. The same analysis was carried in 121 elderly healthy controls from the Iberian peninsular, and a set of 130 individuals from seven African populations belonging to the Centre d'Etude du Polymorphisme Humain-Human Genome Diversity Panel (CEPH-HGDP), in order to determine the extent of normal variability in these genes. Interestingly, in the latter series, we found five new non-synonymous changes in all three genes and a presenilin 2 variant (R62H) that has been previously related to AD. In some of these mutations, the pathologic consequence is uncertain and needs further investigation. To address this question we propose and use a systematic algorithm to classify the putative pathology of AD mutations.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.neurobiolaging.2008.06.012DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2850052PMC
May 2010
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