Publications by authors named "Mintao Lin"

8 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Individual prediction of motor vehicle accidents for patients with epilepsy.

Epilepsy Behav 2021 Jun 7;121(Pt A):108046. Epub 2021 Jun 7.

Department of Neurology, West China Hospital, Sichuan University, No. 37 Guoxue Road, Chengdu, Sichuan 610041, People's Republic of China. Electronic address:

The objective of the study was to design a clinically useful tool to predict the risk of seizure-related motor vehicle accidents (MVAs) for people with epilepsy (PWE). Participants were patients who visited our epilepsy center in West China Hospital from October 2012 to October 2019 and were divided into a primary cohort and a validation cohort. Ultimately, we included 525 patients in the primary cohort and 86 patients in the validation cohort. Proportional hazard regression was performed to measure the prognostic factors of car accidents. The outcome was used to create a nomogram model. The final model had 7 factors, with a C-index of 0.85 (95% CI, 0.80-0.91), to predict the possibility of non-MVA for PWE. For the validation cohort, the C-index was 0.83 (95% CI, 0.72-0.95). This nomogram model can offer more individualized advice to PWE who are still driving by estimating the risk of car accidents.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.yebeh.2021.108046DOI Listing
June 2021

Incidence and risk factors associated with the development of epilepsy in patients with intracranial alveolar echinococcosis.

Epilepsy Res 2021 Aug 27;174:106643. Epub 2021 Apr 27.

Department of Neurology, West China Hospital, Sichuan University, No. 37 Guoxue Road, Chengdu, Sichuan, 610041, People's Republic of China. Electronic address:

Parasitic infection remains a critical health problem in Ganzi Tibetan Autonomous Prefecture of China. The association of epilepsy and intracranial alveolar echinococcosis (IAE) is still largely unclear. This study primarily aimed to assess both the incidence and possible risk factors of epilepsy in patients with IAE. According to the occurrence of seizures, patients were separated into two different groups consisting of patients with epilepsy and those without epilepsy. Univariate and multivariate logistic regression analysis was used to identify the potential risk factors associated with the development of epilepsy in patients with IAE. A total of 97 patients (42 women, 55 men; age 19-76 years) were enrolled. Epilepsy was observed in almost 20 % of patients with IAE. The use of anti-seizure medications was not standardized, as 83.3 % of female patients of childbearing age used sodium valproate. It was observed that cortical lesions (hazard ratio (HR) = 29.740, P = 0.006) were significantly associated with development of epilepsy. In addition, epilepsy had no significant effect on the overall survival rate of patients with IAE.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.eplepsyres.2021.106643DOI Listing
August 2021

Brain functional connectivity patterns in focal cortical dysplasia related epilepsy.

Seizure 2021 Apr 12;87:1-6. Epub 2021 Feb 12.

Department of Neurology, West China Hospital, Sichuan University, No. 37 GuoXue Alley, Chengdu, 610041, China. Electronic address:

Objective: Focal cortical dysplasia (FCD) appears to be strongly associated with intractable epilepsy. Although patients with FCD are candidates for epilepsy surgery, gray matter structural abnormalities can extend beyond the primary lesion, which makes surgery less effective. The objective of this study was to evaluate functional connectivity patterns in epilepsy associated with FCD to explore the underlying pathological mechanism of this disorder.

Methods: A total of 34 patients (14 men) with FCD and epilepsy [mean age ± standard deviation (SD), 24.5 ± 9.8 years; range, 8-47 years] and 34 age-matched healthy controls (14 men, 24.6 ± 9.7 years) underwent functional magnetic resonance imaging. Independent component analysis (ICA), seed-based functional connectivity, and graph theory were applied to analyze functional connectivity patterns in the brain.

Results: Patients showed more connections among dorsal attention network, anterior default mode network, and sensorimotor brain networks than healthy controls based on ICA. Analysis of connectivity between regions of interest (ROIs) showed greater functional connectivity in patients between frontal and temporal regions, but lower connectivity between the cerebellum and frontal regions. The normalized characteristic path length was significantly higher in group of patients, but the two groups showed no significant differences in global or regional efficiency, clustering coefficient or characteristic path length.

Conclusions: Analysis of ICA-derived and ROI-based functional connectivity suggests that disrupted interactions and dysconnectivity in large-scale neural networks and frontotemporal-cerebellar regions may contribute to underlying pathological mechanisms in FCD-related epilepsy.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.seizure.2021.02.009DOI Listing
April 2021

Brain functional connectivity patterns in focal cortical dysplasia related epilepsy.

Seizure 2021 Apr 12;87:1-6. Epub 2021 Feb 12.

Department of Neurology, West China Hospital, Sichuan University, No. 37 GuoXue Alley, Chengdu, 610041, China. Electronic address:

Objective: Focal cortical dysplasia (FCD) appears to be strongly associated with intractable epilepsy. Although patients with FCD are candidates for epilepsy surgery, gray matter structural abnormalities can extend beyond the primary lesion, which makes surgery less effective. The objective of this study was to evaluate functional connectivity patterns in epilepsy associated with FCD to explore the underlying pathological mechanism of this disorder.

Methods: A total of 34 patients (14 men) with FCD and epilepsy [mean age ± standard deviation (SD), 24.5 ± 9.8 years; range, 8-47 years] and 34 age-matched healthy controls (14 men, 24.6 ± 9.7 years) underwent functional magnetic resonance imaging. Independent component analysis (ICA), seed-based functional connectivity, and graph theory were applied to analyze functional connectivity patterns in the brain.

Results: Patients showed more connections among dorsal attention network, anterior default mode network, and sensorimotor brain networks than healthy controls based on ICA. Analysis of connectivity between regions of interest (ROIs) showed greater functional connectivity in patients between frontal and temporal regions, but lower connectivity between the cerebellum and frontal regions. The normalized characteristic path length was significantly higher in group of patients, but the two groups showed no significant differences in global or regional efficiency, clustering coefficient or characteristic path length.

Conclusions: Analysis of ICA-derived and ROI-based functional connectivity suggests that disrupted interactions and dysconnectivity in large-scale neural networks and frontotemporal-cerebellar regions may contribute to underlying pathological mechanisms in FCD-related epilepsy.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.seizure.2021.02.009DOI Listing
April 2021

New onset neurologic events in people with COVID-19 in 3 regions in China.

Neurology 2020 09 17;95(11):e1479-e1487. Epub 2020 Jun 17.

From the Departments of Neurology (W.X., J.M., J.G., L.L., H.G., Y.Z., M.L., S.S., H.Z., L.C., L.H., D.Z.), Pulmonary & Critical Care Medicine (D.L., G.W., W.L.), and Medical Affairs (N.L.), West China Hospital of Sichuan University, Chengdu; Department of Gastrointestinal Surgery (J. Luo), Renmin Hospital of Wuhan University; Department of Neurology (J. Liu, D.Y., S.C.), Chongqing Three Gorges Central Hospital, Chongqing; NIHR University College London Hospitals Biomedical Research Centre (J.W.S.), UCL Queen Square Institute of Neurology, Queen Square, London, UK; Chalfont Centre for Epilepsy (J.W.S.), Chalfont St Peter, UK; and Stichting Epilepsie Instellingen Nederland (SEIN) (J.W.S.), Heemstede, Netherlands.

Objective: To investigate new-onset neurologic impairments associated with coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19).

Methods: A retrospective multicenter cohort study was conducted between January 18 and March 20, 2020, including people with confirmed COVID-19 from 56 hospitals officially designated in 3 Chinese regions; data were extracted from medical records. New-onset neurologic events as assessed by neurology consultants based on manifestations, clinical examination, and investigations were noted, in which critical events included disorders of consciousness, stroke, CNS infection, seizures, and status epilepticus.

Results: We enrolled 917 people with average age 48.7 years and 55% were male. The frequency of new-onset critical neurologic events was 3.5% (32/917) overall and 9.4% (30/319) among those with severe or critical COVID-19. These were impaired consciousness (n = 25) or stroke (n = 10). The risk of critical neurologic events was highly associated with age above 60 years and previous history of neurologic conditions. Noncritical events were seen in fewer than 1% (7/917), including muscle cramp, unexplained headache, occipital neuralgia, tic, and tremor. Brain CT in 28 people led to new findings in 9. Findings from lumbar puncture in 3 with suspected CNS infection, unexplained headache, or severe occipital neuralgia were unremarkable.

Conclusions: People with COVID-19 aged over 60 and with neurologic comorbidities were at higher risk of developing critical neurologic impairment, mainly impaired consciousness and cerebrovascular accidents. Brain CT should be considered when new-onset brain injury is suspected, especially in people under sedation or showing an unexplained decline in consciousness. Evidence of direct acute insult of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 to the CNS is lacking.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1212/WNL.0000000000010034DOI Listing
September 2020

Severe psychological distress among patients with epilepsy during the COVID-19 outbreak in southwest China.

Epilepsia 2020 06 22;61(6):1166-1173. Epub 2020 May 22.

Department of Neurology, West China Hospital, Sichuan University, Sichuan Province, Chengdu, China.

Objective: To compare the severity of psychological distress between patients with epilepsy and healthy controls during the COVID-19 outbreak in southwest China, as well as identify potential risk factors of severe psychological distress among patients with epilepsy.

Methods: This cross-sectional case-control study examined a consecutive sample of patients older than 15 years treated at the epilepsy center of West China Hospital between February 1 and February 29, 2020. As controls, sex- and age-matched healthy visitors of inpatients (unrelated to the patients) were also enrolled during the same period. Data on demographics and attention paid to COVID-19 were collected by online questionnaire, data on epilepsy features were collected from electronic medical records, and psychological distress was evaluated using the 6-item Kessler Psychological Distress Scale (K-6). Potential risk factors of severe psychological distress were identified using multivariate logistic regression.

Results: The 252 patients and 252 controls in this study were similar along all demographic variables except family income. Patients with epilepsy showed significantly higher K-6 scores than healthy controls and spent significantly more time following the COVID-19 outbreak (both P < .001). Univariate analyses associated both diagnosis of drug-resistant epilepsy and time spent paying attention to COVID-19 with severe psychological distress (defined as K-6 score >12; both P ≤ .001). Multivariate logistic regression identified two independent predictors of severe psychological distress: time spent paying attention to COVID-19 (odds ratio [OR] = 1.172, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.073-1.280) and diagnosis of drug-resistant epilepsy (OR = 0.283, 95% CI = 0.128-0.623).

Significance: During public health outbreaks, clinicians and caregivers should focus not only on seizure control but also on mental health of patients with epilepsy, especially those with drug-resistant epilepsy. K-6 scores > 12 indicate severe psychological distress. This may mean, for example, encouraging patients to engage in other activities instead of excessively following media coverage of the outbreak.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/epi.16544DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7267575PMC
June 2020

New onset acute symptomatic seizure and risk factors in coronavirus disease 2019: A retrospective multicenter study.

Epilepsia 2020 06 2;61(6):e49-e53. Epub 2020 May 2.

Department of Neurology, West China Hospital, Sichuan University, Chengdu, China.

Our aim was to clarify the incidence and risk of acute symptomatic seizures in people with coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). This multicenter retrospective study enrolled people with COVID-19 from January 18 to February 18, 2020 at 42 government-designated hospitals in Hubei province, the epicenter of the epidemic in China; Sichuan province; and Chongqing municipality. Data were collected from medical records by 11 neurologists using a standard case report form. A total of 304 people were enrolled, of whom 108 had a severe condition. None in this cohort had a known history of epilepsy. Neither acute symptomatic seizures nor status epilepticus was observed. Two people had seizurelike symptoms during hospitalization due to acute stress reaction and hypocalcemia, and 84 (27%) had brain insults or metabolic imbalances during the disease course known to increase the risk of seizures. There was no evidence suggesting an additional risk of acute symptomatic seizures in people with COVID-19. Neither the virus nor potential risk factors for seizures seem to be significant risks for the occurrence of acute symptomatic seizures in COVID-19.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/epi.16524DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7264627PMC
June 2020

Epilepsy in China: Factors influencing marriage status and fertility.

Seizure 2019 Oct 26;71:179-184. Epub 2019 Jul 26.

Department of Neurology, West China Hospital, Sichuan University, No. 37 Guoxue Road, Chengdu, Sichuan 610041, People's Republic of China. Electronic address:

Purpose: To investigate the current status of marriage and fertility of patients with epilepsy (PWE) and characterize its influencing factors.

Methods: A total of 1,823 adult patients (males age 22 years or older, females age 20 years or older) were included in this study. Data concerning sociodemographic and clinical characteristics were collected. Descriptive analyses, followed by univariate and multivariate logistic regression analyses were utilized to examine factors associated with marriage and fertility of PWE. Marital status of PWE was compared with Chinese population. Standardized marriage rate (SMR) for age and sex was estimated based on the 2010 sixth national population census.

Results: 1,132 patients (62.1%) were married and 823 (45.1%) had a history of fertility. Patients had lower marriage rates than Chinese population (62.1% vs 78.4%). Patients with adult-onset epilepsy (>18 years) had a significantly higher rate of marriage and fertility (p < 0.001) compared to those with childhood-onset epilepsy (≤18 years). Employed patients had higher marriage rates than unemployed patients (64.9% vs 58.6%, p = 0.006), with only male patients being significantly affected by employment status (p < 0.001). Multiple logistic regression revealed that age, age at first seizure onset, and employment status were related to both marriage and fertility.

Conclusion: Epilepsy had negative effects on marriage and fertility status. Marriage and fertility rates were lower in patients with Childhood-onset epilepsy (≤18 years). Furthermore, employment status mainly affected the marriage rate of male patients.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.seizure.2019.07.020DOI Listing
October 2019