Publications by authors named "Minho Shin"

8 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Potential and efficiency of statistical learning closely intertwined with individuals' executive functions: a mathematical modeling study.

Sci Rep 2020 11 2;10(1):18843. Epub 2020 Nov 2.

Department of Brain and Cognitive Sciences, Daegu Gyeongbuk Institute of Science and Technology (DGIST), Daegu, Republic of Korea.

Statistical learning (SL) is essential in enabling humans to extract probabilistic regularities from the world. The ability to accomplish ultimate learning performance with training (i.e., the potential of learning) has been known to be dissociated with performance improvement per amount of learning time (i.e., the efficiency of learning). Here, we quantified the potential and efficiency of SL separately through mathematical modeling and scrutinized how they were affected by various executive functions. Our results showed that a high potential of SL was associated with poor inhibition and good visuo-spatial working memory, whereas high efficiency of SL was closely related to good inhibition and good set-shifting. We unveiled the distinct characteristics of SL in relation to potential and efficiency and their interaction with executive functions.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41598-020-75157-8DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7606401PMC
November 2020

Effect of Educational Program on Knowledge, Attitude, and Willingness of Nursing Students for Hematopoietic Stem-Cell Donation.

Authors:
Miok Kim Minho Shin

Int J Environ Res Public Health 2019 10 1;16(19). Epub 2019 Oct 1.

Department of Computer Engineering, Myongji University, Yongin 17058, Korea.

This study explored how an educational program on hematopoietic stem-cell donation (HSCD) affects the knowledge, attitude, and willingness for HSCD among nursing students. The subjects were the nursing students at a university in Korea: 43 in the experimental group and 42 in the control group. All subjects took a pre-test, and only the experimental group attended an educational program. Both the groups completed two post-tests. Variables of interest were knowledge, attitude, willingness, and registration ratio for HSCD. The educational program increased knowledge ( = 8.093, < 0.001) and attitude ( = -6.422, < 0.001) of the experiment group. After the program, the experimental group showed higher willingness for HSCD ( = 7.609, = 0.006) and higher registration ratio for HSCD (= 4.258, = 0.039) compared to the control group. The educational programs for knowledge and attitude about HSCD will affect the students' future nursing, and influence clients and their families toward positive perception on HSCD and organ donations.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/ijerph16193696DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6801682PMC
October 2019

Clinical outcomes of subtotal cholecystectomy performed for difficult cholecystectomy.

Ann Surg Treat Res 2016 Nov 31;91(5):226-232. Epub 2016 Oct 31.

Department of Surgery, Chosun University School of Medicine, Gwangju, Korea.

Purpose: Laparoscopic subtotal cholecystectomy (LSC) can be an alternative surgical technique for difficult cholecystectomies. Surgeons performing LSC sometimes leave the posterior wall of the gallbladder (GB) to shorten the operation time and avoid liver injury. However, leaving the inflamed posterior GB wall is a major concern. In this study, we evaluated the clinical outcomes of standard laparoscopic cholecystectomy (SLC), LSC, and LSC removing only anterior wall of the GB (LSCA).

Methods: We retrospectively reviewed the medical records of laparoscopic cholecystectomies performed between January 2006 to December 2015 and analyzed the outcomes of SLC, LSC, and LSCA.

Results: A total of 1,037 patients underwent SLC. 22 patients underwent LSC; and 27 patients underwent LSCA. The mean operating times of SLC, LSC, and LSCA were 41, 74, and 68 minutes, respectively (P < 0.01). Blood loss was 5, 45, and 33 mL (P < 0.05). The mean lengths of postoperative hospitalization were 3.4, 5.4, and 5.8 days. Complications occurred in 24 SLC patients (2.3%), 2 LSC patients (9%), and 1 LSCA patient (3.7%). There was no mortality among the LSC and LSCA patients.

Conclusion: LSC and LSCA are safe and feasible alternatives for difficult cholecystectomies. These procedures help surgeons avoid bile duct injury and conversion to laparotomy. LSCA has the benefits of shorter operation time and less bleeding compared to LSC.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.4174/astr.2016.91.5.226DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5107416PMC
November 2016

Development and Evaluation of Simulation-Problem-Based Learning for Sex Education.

Authors:
Miok Kim Minho Shin

Comput Inform Nurs 2016 Jan;34(1):17-25; quiz 55

Author Affiliations: Department of Nursing, Namseoul University, Chunahn, Choongnam (Dr Kim); and Department of Computer Engineering, Myongji University, Cheoingu, Yongin (Dr Shin), Republic of Korea.

Nurses often encounter clients with sexual problems. A sexual problem is complicated and affects the quality of the client's life, and proper care requires the nurse to understand a variety of sex-related issues. Therefore, effective sex education for nursing students is necessary to prepare them for potential challenges from the client's sexual problems. In this study, we developed a simulation-problem-based sex education program for nursing students. The program immerses the students in a sex-related clinical situation to train them with nursing assessment, intervention skills, patient safety, patient privacy, and communication skills. To evaluate the effect of the program on the student's sexual knowledge and attitude, we provided the experimental group with simulation-problem-based sex education program along with traditional lectures, whereas the control group received only lectures. As a result, there were statistically significant differences in the improvement of knowledge (P < .05) and attitude (P < .05) of the two groups. The results show that the designed program effectively promotes nursing students' sexual knowledge and sexual attitude, and the simulation-problem-based learning is a practical and systematic approach to the sex education of nursing students.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/CIN.0000000000000200DOI Listing
January 2016

Location Privacy for Mobile Crowd Sensing through Population Mapping.

Sensors (Basel) 2015 Jun 29;15(7):15285-310. Epub 2015 Jun 29.

Dartmouth College, Hanover, NH 03755, USA.

Opportunistic sensing allows applications to "task" mobile devices to measure context in a target region. For example, one could leverage sensor-equipped vehicles to measure traffic or pollution levels on a particular street or users' mobile phones to locate (Bluetooth-enabled) objects in their vicinity. In most proposed applications, context reports include the time and location of the event, putting the privacy of users at increased risk: even if identifying information has been removed from a report, the accompanying time and location can reveal sufficient information to de-anonymize the user whose device sent the report. We propose and evaluate a novel spatiotemporal blurring mechanism based on tessellation and clustering to protect users' privacy against the system while reporting context. Our technique employs a notion of probabilistic k-anonymity; it allows users to perform local blurring of reports efficiently without an online anonymization server before the data are sent to the system. The proposed scheme can control the degree of certainty in location privacy and the quality of reports through a system parameter. We outline the architecture and security properties of our approach and evaluate our tessellation and clustering algorithm against real mobility traces.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/s150715285DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4541831PMC
June 2015

Influencing factors on the cord-blood donation of post-partum women.

Nurs Health Sci 2015 Jun;17(2):269-75

Department of Nursing, Namseoul University, Cheonahn, Republic of Korea.

This study aims to identify the factors on the cord-blood donation of Korean post-partum women, who may store, donate, or discard their infant's cord blood. This descriptive research assesses the level of knowledge and attitude of post-partum women in Korea, regarding cord blood and its usage. The participants in this study were 320 post-partum women of which 109 stored, 34 donated, and 177 discarded their cord blood. The knowledge level of women who donated or stored their cord blood was higher than that of those who discarded. The attitude level of the women who donated was higher than that of those who stored or discarded. Knowledge, attitude, income, and source of information were the factors on the cord-blood donation; high knowledge, high attitude, low income, and information source from mass media contributes to cord-blood donation. In order to promote the cord-blood donation, it is necessary to develop guidelines for cord-blood education to improve the knowledge and attitudes of child-bearing women and healthcare professionals.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/nhs.12194DOI Listing
June 2015

Development and evaluation of simulation-based training for obstetrical nursing using human patient simulators.

Authors:
Miok Kim Minho Shin

Comput Inform Nurs 2013 Feb;31(2):76-84

Department of Nursing, Namseoul University, Cheonan, Chungcheongnam-do, South Korea.

As the observation of obstetrical patients with diverse complications is increasingly rare in clinical training, computerized high-fidelity simulators can greatly benefit obstetrical nurse education. However,simulation scenarios in obstetrical nursing are not well studied. This study aims to develop simulation scenarios for obstetrical nursing that (1) demonstrate clinical situations from prenatal, labor and delivery, to postpartum phases and (2) provide educational tools for student evaluation and weakness identification. We developed four simulation scenarios: prenatal, labor and delivery I, labor and delivery II, and postpartum. Each scenario is designed to demonstrate students' knowledge, techniques, and interpersonal skills. One hundred thirty-eight second-year nursing students were trained with four scenarios using a high-fidelity simulator, after which each student was evaluated by one selected scenario. In the experiments, students' self-confidence increased after the program in all scenarios (P < .001). Students scored higher in prenatal and postpartum scenarios than labor and delivery I and II scenarios. In particular, most students could perform relevant actions, but many students failed to perform the actions correctly. Our results show that the designed scenarios are effectual for promoting students' self-confidence and improving the quality of obstetrical nursing education.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/NXN.0b013e3182701041DOI Listing
February 2013

Secure remote health monitoring with unreliable mobile devices.

Authors:
Minho Shin

J Biomed Biotechnol 2012 15;2012:546021. Epub 2012 Jul 15.

Myongji University, Yongin, Gyeonggi-do, Republic of Korea.

As the nation's healthcare information infrastructure continues to evolve, new technologies promise to provide readily accessible health information that can help people address personal and community health concerns. In particular, wearable and implantable medical sensors and portable computing devices present many opportunities for providing timely health information to health providers, public health professionals, and consumers. Concerns about privacy and information quality, however, may impede the development and deployment of these technologies for remote health monitoring. Patients may fail to apply sensors correctly, device can be stolen or compromised (exposing the medical data therein to a malicious party), low-cost sensors controlled by a capable attacker might generate falsified data, and sensor data sent to the server can be captured in the air by an eavesdropper; there are many opportunities for sensitive health data to be lost, forged, or exposed. In this paper, we design a framework for secure remote health-monitoring systems; we build a realistic risk model for sensor-data quality and propose a new health-monitoring architecture that is secure despite the weaknesses of common personal devices. For evaluation, we plan to implement a proof of concept for secure health monitoring.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/546021DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3403647PMC
November 2012