Publications by authors named "Mingee Kim"

4 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Investigation of long-term metabolic alteration after stroke in tMCAO (transient middle cerebral artery occlusion) mouse model using metabolomics approach.

Neurosci Lett 2022 03 31;774:136492. Epub 2022 Jan 31.

College of Pharmacy, Sookmyung Women's University, Seoul 04310, Korea. Electronic address:

Stroke causes serious long-term disability and numerous molecular changes, including inflammation, depression, and immunosuppression. Despite this, the underlying metabolic mechanisms of poststroke complications remain unclear, and assessing metabolic changes may be beneficial. In this study, we investigated the changes in brain damage and long-term metabolic changes caused by stroke in a transient middle cerebral artery occlusion (tMCAO) mouse model. Metabolic profiling was conducted using UPLC-Orbitrap-MS/MS to compare the metabolites that changed 1 day, 1 week, 1 month, and 6 months after stroke. tMCAO caused an infarction that peaked at 1 week, following which atrophy was observed up to 6 months along with metabolomic changes. From the metabolomics analysis, 72 important metabolites associated with poststroke were identified, and the changes in their levels were most at 1 day and less significant at 1 week followed by a significant change 6 months after stroke. Fatty acids, corticosterone, tyrosine, and tryptophan metabolites are involved in immunosuppression and inflammation. These results indicated that the change in metabolic level after stroke was persistent and could be associated with poststroke complications, such as brain atrophy. Therefore, it was concluded that long-term metabolic changes could involve the chronic after-effects of ischemic stroke.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.neulet.2022.136492DOI Listing
March 2022

hnRNP Q and hnRNP A1 Regulate the Translation of Cofilin in Response to Transient Oxygen-Glucose Deprivation in Hippocampal Neurons.

Cells 2021 12 17;10(12). Epub 2021 Dec 17.

Department of Life Sciences, Pohang University of Science and Technology (POSTECH), Pohang 37673, Korea.

Protein aggregates of cofilin and actin have been found in neurons under oxygen-glucose deprivation. However, the regulatory mechanism behind the expression of during oxygen-glucose deprivation remains unclear. Here, we found that heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoproteins (hnRNP) Q and hnRNP A1 regulate the translation of mRNA, and formation of cofilin-actin aggregates. The interaction between hnRNP A1 and mRNA was interrupted by hnRNP Q under normal conditions, while the changes in the expression and localization of hnRNP Q and hnRNP A1 increased such interaction, as did the translation of mRNA under oxygen-glucose deprived conditions. These findings reveal a new translational regulatory mechanism of mRNA in hippocampal neurons under oxygen-glucose deprivation.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/cells10123567DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8700186PMC
December 2021

Education and Outreach in Physical Sciences in Oncology.

Trends Cancer 2021 01 7;7(1):3-9. Epub 2020 Nov 7.

Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Mayo Clinic, Jacksonville, FL, USA; Department of Physiology and Biomedical Engineering, Mayo Clinic, Jacksonville, FL, USA; Department of Transplantation, Mayo Clinic, Jacksonville, FL, USA; Center for Immunotherapeutic Transport Oncophysics, Houston Methodist Research Institute, Houston, TX, USA. Electronic address:

Physical sciences are often overlooked in the field of cancer research. The Physical Sciences in Oncology Initiative was launched to integrate physics, mathematics, chemistry, and engineering with cancer research and clinical oncology through education, outreach, and collaboration. Here, we provide a framework for education and outreach in emerging transdisciplinary fields.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.trecan.2020.10.007DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7895467PMC
January 2021

Estrogenic properties of Prunus cerasoides extract and its constituents in MCF-7 cell and evaluation in estrogen-deprived rodent models.

Phytother Res 2020 Jun 7;34(6):1347-1357. Epub 2020 Jan 7.

College of Pharmacy, Drug Information Research Institute, Sookmyung Women's University, Seoul, Republic of Korea.

Prunus cerasoides (PC) products contain relatively high levels of flavones and isoflavones and may be potential sources of phytoestrogens for postmenopausal symptom relief. We assessed the PC extract (PCE) and its representative constituents in vitro with assays for estrogen receptor alpha binding, estrogen response element transcriptional activity, cell proliferation, and gene expression changes for pS2 in MCF-7 cells. PCE and its compounds showed strong estrogen receptor binding affinities and estrogen response element induction. A previously undescribed compound (designated as compound 18), now identified as being gentisic acid, 5-O-β-D-(6'-O-trans-4-coumaroyl)-glucopyranoside, also showed potent estrogenic properties and induced proliferation of MCF-7 cells. PCE was evaluated for its in vivo uterotrophic effects in immature female rats as well as for its lipid lowering effects in estrogen-deprived animals. For ovariectomized rats and aged female mice, PCE-treated groups had lower plasma triglyceride levels compared with control and, for the same comparison, had reduced serum levels of liver stress/damage markers. Our results point to strong estrogenic activities and beneficial metabolic effects for PCE, with properties that put PC and its extracts as promising sources of phytoestrogens for symptom relief in menopausal and postmenopausal cases.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ptr.6604DOI Listing
June 2020
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