Publications by authors named "Ming-Xun Ren"

9 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Phytomelatonin: An overview of the importance and mediating functions of melatonin against environmental stresses.

Physiol Plant 2021 Jun 18;172(2):820-846. Epub 2020 Nov 18.

Department of Life Sciences, National University of Kaohsiung, Kaohsiung, Taiwan.

Recently, melatonin has gained significant importance in plant research. The presence of melatonin in the plant kingdom has been known since 1995. It is a molecule that is conserved in a wide array of evolutionary distant organisms. Its functions and characteristics have been found to be similar in both plants and animals. The review focuses on the role of melatonin pertaining to physiological functions in higher plants. Melatonin regulates physiological functions regarding auxin activity, root, shoot, and explant growth, activates germination of seeds, promotes rhizogenesis (growth of adventitious and lateral roots), and holds up impelled leaf senescence. Melatonin is a natural bio-stimulant that creates resistance in field crops against various abiotic stress, including heat, chemical pollutants, cold, drought, salinity, and harmful ultra-violet radiation. The full potential of melatonin in regulating physiological functions in higher plants still needs to be explored by further research.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/ppl.13262DOI Listing
June 2021

(Gesneriaceae), a new species from mountain tops of Hainan Island, South China.

PhytoKeys 2020 26;157:121-135. Epub 2020 Aug 26.

Center for Eco-Environmental Restoration Engineering of Hainan Province, College of Ecology and Environment, Hainan University, Haikou 570228, China.

A new species of Gesneriaceae, S.J.Ling, F.Wen & M.X. Ren from Hainan Island, south China, is highlighted and described. The new species is distinguished by its actinomorphic corolla, narrow floral tube and ovate anthers hidden in the floral tube. The new species also showed clear geographic and altitudinal isolation from the three currently-recognised species on the Island. Molecular phylogenetic analysis, based on nuclear ITS1/2 and plastid L-F sequences, supported the delimitation of the new species, which forms a single lineage with all the other species from Hainan Island. The roles of geographic and floral isolation in the evolution of the new species and its affinities are discussed.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3897/phytokeys.157.50246DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7467974PMC
August 2020

Genetic delimitation of species from Hainan Island.

PhytoKeys 2020 26;157:59-81. Epub 2020 Aug 26.

Key Laboratory of Genetics and Germplasm Innovation of Tropical Special Forest Trees and Ornamental Plants (Hainan University), Ministry of Education, Haikou 570228, China Hainan University Haikou China.

Hainan Island harbours an extraordinary diversity of Gesneriaceae with 14 genera and 23 species, amongst which two species and one variety are recognised in the genus . These three taxa are all Hainan-endemics and show a complex geographical distribution pattern with considerable morphological intermixtures. In this study, we combined DNA (nuclear ITS sequences and cpDNAL-F and 1b) to evaluate genetic delimitation for 12 populations from the island, together with morphological similarity analysis using 16 morphological traits. The results showed Hainan taxa were monophyletic with relative low genetic diversity within populations, highly significant genetic differentiation amongst populations and a significant phylogeographical structure. The 12 populations formed three genetically distinct groups, roughly correspondent to the currently recognised two species and one unknown lineage. The PCA analyses of morphological traits indicate three distinctive groups, differing mainly in petal colour and corolla shapes. The roles of river and mountain isolations in the origin and distribution of these three lineages are discussed.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3897/phytokeys..32427DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7467941PMC
August 2020

Biogeography and evolution of Asian Gesneriaceae based on updated taxonomy.

PhytoKeys 2020 26;157:7-26. Epub 2020 Aug 26.

Center for Terrestrial Biodiversity of the South China Sea, College of Ecology and Environment, Hainan University, Haikou 570228, China Hainan University Haikou China.

Based on an updated taxonomy of Gesneriaceae, the biogeography and evolution of the Asian Gesneriaceae are outlined and discussed. Most of the Asian Gesneriaceae belongs to Didymocarpoideae, except was recently moved into Gesnerioideae. Most basal taxa of the Asian Gesneriaceae are found in the Indian subcontinent and Indo-China Peninsula, suggesting Didymocarpoideae might originate in these regions. Four species diversification centers were recognized, i.e. Sino-Vietnam regions, Malay Peninsula, North Borneo and Northwest Yunnan (Hengduan Mountains). The first three regions are dominated by limestone landscapes, while the Northwest Yunnan is well-known for its numerous deep gorges and high mountains. The places with at least 25% species are neoendemics (newly evolved and narrowly endemic) which were determined as evolutionary hotspots, including Hengduan Mountains, boundary areas of Yunnan-Guizhou-Guangxi in Southwest China, North Borneo, Pahang and Terengganu in Malay Peninsula, and mountainous areas in North Thailand, North Sulawesi Island. Finally, the underlying mechanisms for biogeographical patterns and species diversification of the Asian Gesneriaceae are discussed.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3897/phytokeys.157.34032DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7467973PMC
August 2020

Gesneriaceae in China and Vietnam: Perfection of taxonomy based on comprehensive morphological and molecular evidence.

PhytoKeys 2020 26;157:1-5. Epub 2020 Aug 26.

CAS Key Laboratory for Plant Diversity and Biogeography of East Asia, Kunming Institute of Botany, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 132 Lanhei Road, CN-650201, Kunming, Yunnan Province, China Chinese Academy of Sciences Kunming China.

No.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3897/phytokeys.157.56842DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7467968PMC
August 2020

Pollen-mediated gene flow ensures connectivity among spatially discrete sub-populations of Phalaenopsis pulcherrima, a tropical food-deceptive orchid.

BMC Plant Biol 2019 Dec 30;19(1):597. Epub 2019 Dec 30.

Key Laboratory of Genetics and Germplasm Innovation of Tropical Special Forest Trees and Ornamental Plants (Hainan University), Ministry of Education, College of Forestry, Hainan University, Haikou, People's Republic of China.

Background: Gene flow in plants via pollen and seeds is asymmetrical at different geographic scales. Orchid seeds are adapted to long-distance wind dispersal but pollinium transfer is often influenced by pollinator behavior. We combined field studies with an analysis of genetic diversity among 155 physically mapped adults and 1105 F1 seedlings to evaluate the relative contribution of pollen and seed dispersal to overall gene flow among three sub-populations of the food-deceptive orchid Phalaenopsis pulcherrima on Hainan Island, China.

Results: Phalaenopsis pulcherrima is self-sterile and predominantly outcrossing, resulting in high population-level genetic diversity, but plants are clumped and exhibit fine-scale genetic structuring. Even so, we detected low differentiation among sub-populations, with polynomial regression analysis suggesting gene flow via seed to be more restricted than that via pollen. Paternity analysis confirmed capsules of P. pulcherrima to each be sired by a single pollen donor, probably in part facilitated by post-pollination stigma obfuscation, with a mean pollen flow distance of 272.7 m. Despite limited sampling, we detected no loss of genetic diversity from one generation to the next.

Conclusions: Outcrossing mediated by deceptive pollination and self-sterility promote high genetic diversity in P. pulcherrima. Long-range pollinia transfer ensures connectivity among sub-populations, offsetting the risk of genetic erosion at local scales.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12870-019-2179-yDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6937714PMC
December 2019

Molecular phylogeny of (Malpighiaceae) reveals a new species from Southwest China.

PhytoKeys 2019 5;135:91-104. Epub 2019 Dec 5.

Key Laboratory of Genetics and Germplasm Innovation of Tropical Special Forest Trees and Ornamental Plants, College of Ecology and Environment, Hainan University, Haikou 570228, China Hainan University Haikou China.

is an Asia-endemic genus of Malpighiaceae currently placed in the tetrapteroid clade, representing one of the seven inter-continent dispersions from New to Old World. A molecular phylogeny based on sequences of the internal transcribed spacer (ITS) region was recovered for the first time for the genus. Our results showed that the most recent common ancestor of probably originated in the South Indo-China Peninsula and diversified in this region. Based on phylogenetic evidence and relevant morphological traits, we propose a new species; is characterised by mericarps with arcuate anterior lateral wings, two large glands on the dorsal sepals, and small glands on the remaining sepals. The new species is from Mt. Cangshan, Dali City (25°35'N, 100°02'E) in North Yunnan, Southwest China and is notable for its occurrence at high altitude, 1400 m (the highest distribution currently known for the genus). The implications of this unusual species for the dispersal and evolution of the genus are discussed.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3897/phytokeys.135.37011DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6908513PMC
December 2019

Is there 'anther-anther interference' within a flower? Evidences from one-by-one stamen movement in an insect-pollinated plant.

PLoS One 2014 27;9(1):e86581. Epub 2014 Jan 27.

Institute for Peat and Mire Research, Northeast Normal University, State Environmental Protection Key Laboratory of Wetland Ecology and Vegetation Restoration, Changchun, China.

The selective pressure imposed by maximizing male fitness (pollen dispersal) in shaping floral structures is increasingly recognized and emphasized in current plant sciences. To maximize male fitness, many flowers bear a group of stamens with temporally separated anther dehiscence that prolongs presentation of pollen grains. Such an advantage, however, may come with a cost resulting from interference of pollen removal by the dehisced anthers. This interference between dehisced and dehiscing anthers has received little attention and few experimental tests to date. Here, using one-by-one stamen movement in the generalist-pollinated Parnassia palustris, we test this hypothesis by manipulation experiments in two years. Under natural conditions, the five fertile stamens in P. palustris flowers elongate their filaments individually, and anthers dehisce successively one-by-one. More importantly, the anther-dehisced stamen bends out of the floral center by filament deflexion before the next stamen's anther dehiscence. Experimental manipulations show that flowers with dehisced anther remaining at the floral center experience shorter (1/3-1/2 less) visit durations by pollen-collecting insects (mainly hoverflies and wasps) because these 'hungry' insects are discouraged by the scant and non-fresh pollen in the dehisced anther. Furthermore, the dehisced anther blocks the dehiscing anther's access to floral visitors, resulting in a nearly one third decrease in their contact frequency. As a result, pollen removal of the dehiscing anther decreases dramatically. These results provide the first direct experimental evidence that anther-anther interference is possible in a flower, and that the selection to reduce such interferences can be a strong force in floral evolution. We also propose that some other floral traits, usually interpreted as pollen dispensing mechanisms, may function, at least partially, as mechanisms to promote pollen dispersal by reducing interferences between dehisced and dehiscing anthers.
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http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0086581PLOS
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3903572PMC
November 2014

Up and down: stamen movements in Ruta graveolens (Rutaceae) enhance both outcrossing and delayed selfing.

Ann Bot 2012 Oct 7;110(5):1017-25. Epub 2012 Aug 7.

Key Laboratory of Aquatic Botany and Watershed Ecology, Wuhan Botanical Garden, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Wuhan, China.

Background And Aims: Stamen movements directly determine pollen fates and mating patterns by altering positions of female and male organs. However, the implications of such movements in terms of pollination are not well understood. Recently, complex patterns of stamen movements have been identified in Loasaceae, Parnassiaceae, Rutaceae and Tropaeolaceae. In this study the stamen movements in Ruta graveolens (Rutaceae) and their impact on pollination are determined.

Methods: Pollination effects of stamen movements were studied in Ruta graveolens, in which one-by-one uplifting and falling back is followed by simultaneous movement of all stamens in some flowers. Using 30 flowers, one stamen was manipulated either to be immobilized or to be allowed to move freely towards the centre of the flower but be prevented from falling back. Pollen loads on stigmas and ovule fertilization in flowers with or without simultaneous stamen movement were determined.

Results: Pollen removal decreased dramatically (P < 0·001) when the stamen was stopped from uplifting because its anther was seldom contacted by pollinators. When a stamen stayed at the flower's centre, pollen removal of the next freely moved anther decreased significantly (P < 0·005) because of fewer touches by pollinators and quick leaving of pollinators that were discouraged by the empty anther. Simultaneous stamen movement occurred only in flowers with low pollen load on the stigma and the remaining pollen in anthers dropped onto stigma surfaces after stamens moved to the flower's centre.

Conclusions: In R. graveolens pollen removal is promoted through one-by-one movement of the stamen, which presents pollen in doses to pollinators by successive uplifting of the stamen and avoids interference of two consecutively dehisced anthers by falling back of the former stamen before the next one moves into the flower's centre. Simultaneous stamen movement at the end of anthesis probably reflects an adaptation for late-acting self-pollination.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/aob/mcs181DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3448434PMC
October 2012