Publications by authors named "Mina Sharbatoghli"

6 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Prediction of the treatment response in ovarian cancer: a ctDNA approach.

J Ovarian Res 2020 Oct 19;13(1):124. Epub 2020 Oct 19.

Oncopathology Research Center, Iran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran.

Ovarian cancer is the eighth most commonly occurring cancer in women. Clinically, the limitation of conventional screening and monitoring approaches inhibits high throughput analysis of the tumor molecular markers toward prediction of treatment response. Recently, analysis of liquid biopsies including circulating tumor DNA (ctDNA) open new way toward cancer diagnosis and treatment in a personalized manner in various types of solid tumors. In the case of ovarian carcinoma, growing pre-clinical and clinical studies underscored promising application of ctDNA in diagnosis, prognosis, and prediction of treatment response. In this review, we accumulate and highlight recent molecular findings of ctDNA analysis and its associations with treatment response and patient outcome. Additionally, we discussed the potential application of ctDNA in the personalized treatment of ovarian carcinoma. ctDNA-monitoring usage during the ovarian cancer treatments procedures.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s13048-020-00729-1DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7574472PMC
October 2020

Optimizing methods for human testicular tissue cryopreservation and spermatogonial stem cell isolation.

J Cell Biochem 2019 01 22;120(1):613-621. Epub 2018 Sep 22.

Department of Stem Cells and Developmental Biology, Cell Science Research Center, Royan Institute for Stem Cell Biology and Technology, ACECR, Tehran, Iran.

Cryopreservation of testicular tissue before cancer therapy for fertility preservation in prepubertal boys with cancer is of great interest in reproductive medicine. Isolation of spermatogonial stem cells (SSCs) from cryopreserved tissues would be a suitable cell source to re-establish spermatogenesis after cancer therapy. We herein establish optimized protocols for cryopreservation of human testicular tissue and isolation of SSCs from cryopreserved tissue. We developed a freezing protocol that provided high testicular cell viability and supported structural integrity and tubular epithelium coherence similar to fresh tissue. Then, we established a protocol that allowed efficient isolation of functional SSCs from cryopreserved tissues. Isolated cells were found on the testicular basement membrane after xenotransplantation. Our results demonstrated the preservation of testicular tissue structure and high cell viability with efficient isolation of SSCs after testicular cryopreservation, which is promising for future therapeutic applications in fertility preservation.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/jcb.27419DOI Listing
January 2019

Comparison of apoptosis pathway following the use of two protocols for vitrification of immature mouse testicular tissue.

Theriogenology 2016 Nov 13;86(8):2073-82. Epub 2016 Jul 13.

Razi Herbal Medicines Research Center, Lorestan University of Medical Sciences, Khorramabad, Iran.

Our objective was to evaluate the apoptosis incidence in immature mouse testicular tissue after two different protocols of vitrification and short-term culture. Testes of 7-day-old Naval Medical Research Institute mice were isolated and distributed into control and vitrification groups. In vitrification 1 group, testes were vitrified using a combination of ethylene glycol and DMSO in three steps, and in vitrification 2 group, testes were vitrified using a combination of ethylene glycol and sucrose in five steps. Then, fresh and vitrified-warmed testis fragments were cultured for 20 hours. Morphology, cell viability, apoptosis incidence, and apoptosis gene expression (BAX, BCL2, Caspase 3, Fas, Fas ligand, p53) were evaluated at 0, 3, and 20 hours of culture by light microscopy, flow cytometry, and real-time polymerase chain reaction, respectively. Significant decrease of early apoptosis (annexin V+/PI- cells in vitrification 1 and 2 groups at 0 hours of culture, 37.34 ± 0.91 and 30.72 ± 2.2, and at 20 hours of culture, 1.46 ± 0.28 and 0.76 ± 0.11, respectively), increase of late apoptosis (annexin V+/PI+ cells in vitrification 1 group at 0 hours of culture, 14.46 ± 0.86, and at 20 hours of culture, 37.18 ± 2.34), and BAX/BCL-2 ratio (in vitrification 1 and 2 groups at 0 hours of culture, 7.31 ± 0.31 and 6.83 ± 1.38, and at 20 hours of culture, 24.08 ± 4.32 and 9.35 ± 1.91, respectively) were observed in vitrification groups during culture period. Caspase 3 expression was significantly decreased in all groups after 3 hours of culture (in control, vitrification 1, and vitrification 2 groups at 0 hours of culture, 1.00 ± 0.0, 1.56 ± 0.09, and 0.79 ± 0.06, and at 20 hours of culture, 0.37 ± 0.0, 0.96 ± 0.10, and 0.12 ± 0.03, respectively). Expression of p53 was significantly lower in vitrification 1 (0.32 ± 0.02) and control (0.50 ± 0.03) groups in 20 hours of culture as compared with vitrification 2 (0.88 ± 0.14) group. Fas (in vitrification 1 and 2 groups at 0 hours of culture, 2.29 ± 0.23 and 1.14 ± 0.15, and at 20 hours of culture, 12.43 ± 0.46 and 6.7 ± 0.48, respectively) and Fas Ligand (in vitrification 1 and 2 groups at 0 hours of culture, 1.2 ± 0.28 and 5.24 ± 0.32, and at 20 hours of culture, 21.75 ± 2.00 and 25.82 ± 2.15, respectively) expressions significantly increased in vitrification groups after 20 hours of culture. Although both vitrification protocols cause cell death via apoptotic and necrotic pathway, it seems that vitrification 1 protocol induces cell death more via apoptotic pathway than via necrosis. The apoptosis incidence after vitrification may have occurred independent of p53.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.theriogenology.2016.06.027DOI Listing
November 2016

The Relationship between Seminal Melatonin with Sperm Parameters, DNA Fragmentation and Nuclear Maturity in Intra-Cytoplasmic Sperm Injection Candidates.

Cell J 2015 7;17(3):547-53. Epub 2015 Oct 7.

Department of Embryology, Reproductive Biomedicine Research Center, Royan Institute for Reproductive Biomedicine, ACECR, Tehran, Iran.

Objective: Melatonin, the chief secretory product of the pineal gland, regulates dynamic physiological adaptations that occur in seasonally breeding mammals as a response to changes in daylight hours. Because of the presence of melatonin in semen and the mem- brane melatonin receptor in spermatozoa, the impact of melatonin on the regulation of male infertility is still questionable. The aim of this study was to determine the effects of endogenous melatonin on human semen parameters (sperm concentration, motility and normal morphology), DNA fragmentation (DF) and nuclear maturity.

Materials And Methods: In this clinical prospective study, semen samples from 75 infer- tile men were routinely analyzed and assessed for melatonin and total antioxidant capac- ity (TAC) levels using the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and colorimetric assay kits, respectively. DF was examined by the sperm chromatin dispersion (SCD) test. Acidic aniline blue staining was used to detect chromatin defects in the sperm nuclei.

Results: There was no significant correlation between seminal plasma melatonin and TAC with sperm parameters and nuclear maturity. However, we observed a positive significant correlation between DF and melatonin level (r=0.273, P<0.05).

Conclusion: Melatonin in seminal plasma is positively correlated with damaged sperm DNA of infertile patients. The mechanism of this phenomenon needs further study.
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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4601876PMC
http://dx.doi.org/10.22074/cellj.2015.15DOI Listing
October 2015

Evaluation of conventional semen parameters, intracellular reactive oxygen species, DNA fragmentation and dysfunction of mitochondrial membrane potential after semen preparation techniques: a flow cytometric study.

Arch Gynecol Obstet 2014 Jan 12;289(1):173-80. Epub 2013 Jul 12.

Department of Embryology at Reproductive Biomedicine Research Center, Royan Institute for Reproductive Biomedicine, ACECR, P. O. 19395-4644, Tehran, Iran,

Purpose: The aim of this study was to evaluate the conventional sperm parameters, level of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS), DNA fragmentation (DF) and dysfunction of mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP) after semen preparation techniques with flow cytometry.

Methods: Semen samples were obtained from 28 men with normal semen analysis according to WHO (world health organization). Each was divided into three equal parts for processing with routine techniques: conventional swim up (CSW), direct swim up (DSW) and density gradient centrifugation (DGC). The conventional sperm parameters were evaluated with computer-assisted sperm analyzer (CASA) and the level of intracellular ROS, dysfunction of MMP and DF were determined with flow cytometry procedure.

Results: Conventional sperm parameters such as motility, progressive motility and normal morphology increased after sperm processing by CSW and DGC compared to DSW. A significant increase in intracellular H₂O₂ (p < 0.05) was demonstrated in the CSW versus DSW technique, while processed sperm by the DSW procedure showed a significant increase in the percentage of dysfunction of MMP and intracellular O₂(•-) (p < 0.05) when compared with CSW and DGC techniques. Additionally, a high mean of DF (p < 0.05) was observed in the DGC technique as compared to CSW.

Conclusion: Data from flow cytometry study demonstrated that intracellular H₂O₂ and DF increased after CSW and DGC processing techniques, respectively, whereas the level of intracellular O₂(•-) and dysfunction of MMP only increased after the DSW processing technique.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00404-013-2946-1DOI Listing
January 2014

Relationship of sperm DNA fragmentation, apoptosis and dysfunction of mitochondrial membrane potential with semen parameters and ART outcome after intracytoplasmic sperm injection.

Arch Gynecol Obstet 2012 Nov 4;286(5):1315-22. Epub 2012 Jul 4.

Department of Embryology, Reproductive Biomedicine Research Center, Royan Institute for Reproductive Biomedicine, ACECR, PO Box 19395-4644 Tehran, Iran.

Purpose: The objective of this study was to assess the relationship of DNA damage, apoptosis and dysfunction of mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP) in ejaculated spermatozoa with semen parameters (sperm concentration, motility and normal morphology) and to evaluate their effects on assisted reproductive technology (ART) outcomes after intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI).

Methods: Semen parameters in 120 infertile couples who underwent ICSI treatment were routinely analyzed and examined for the incidence of sperm DNA fragmentation (DF) by the sperm chromatin dispersion test (SCD). Whereas the incidences of sperm apoptosis and dysfunction of MMP were assessed by flow cytometry. The correlation among different sperm factors and ART outcomes was evaluated statistically.

Results: Sperm parameters were negatively related to DF (motility and normal morphology, p < 0.01), apoptosis (concentration, motility and normal morphology, p < 0.01, p < 0.05 and p < 0.05, p < 0.01 respectively), and dysfunction of sperm MMP (concentration, motility and normal morphology, p < 0.01). DF also showed a positive correlation with apoptosis and dysfunction of sperm MMP (p < 0.05, and p < 0.01 respectively). However, there was no significant correlation among DF, apoptosis and dysfunction of sperm MMP with ART outcomes, except early apoptosis which showed significant (p < 0.05) negative correlation with pregnancy rate.

Conclusion: In the present study; DF, apoptosis and dysfunction of sperm MMP indicated negative relationship with sperm parameters. Although there was a negative correlation between early apoptosis and pregnancy rate, no significant correlation was observed between these parameters and ICSI outcomes.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00404-012-2440-1DOI Listing
November 2012