Publications by authors named "Milan D Amin"

1 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

A survey of adult preferences regarding recruitment for pediatric research.

Int J Pediatr Otorhinolaryngol 2020 Aug 15;135:110108. Epub 2020 May 15.

UC San Diego School of Medicine, La Jolla, CA, USA; Pediatric Otolaryngology, Rady Children's San Diego, San Diego, CA, USA; Department of Surgery, UC San Diego, La Jolla, CA, USA.

Objective: Although subject recruitment is one of the most critical aspects of human subject research, there is a lack of studies prospectively examining the recruitment preferences of adults for research involving children.

Methods: This was a cross-sectional study of adults accompanying patients at an otolaryngology clinic in a pediatric medical center. Anonymous questionnaires were distributed in English and Spanish to one adult for every patient. Questions assessed the respondent's preferences for research recruitment including contact method preferences, contact preferences for medical profession type, and whether they would expect a child to receive a small gift for participating in a research study. Fisher's exact tests were used to assess the association between the primary predictor, language, and each outcome.

Results: 566 surveys were collected. 505 (89.1%) were completed in English and 61 (10.7%) were completed in Spanish. Spanish-speaking respondents were more likely to prefer talking to a doctor (76.7%) than English-speaking respondents (40.1%, p < 0.05). Spanish-speaking respondents were more likely to prefer talking over the phone (48.3%) than English-speaking respondents (17.3%, p < 0.05). Spanish-speaking respondents were more likely to prefer communicating via text messaging (41.7%) than English-speaking respondents (16.3%, p < 0.05). English-speaking respondents were more likely to prefer communicating through the patient portal of an electronic health record (EHR) (19%) than Spanish-speaking respondents(3.3%, p < 0.05). Mothers were more likely to prefer talking to a nurse/physician's assistant (20%) than fathers (10%, p < 0.05). Mothers were more likely to prefer talking to research staff (20%) than fathers (9%, p < 0.05). Mothers were more likely to prefer communication via text-message (22%) than fathers (6%, p < 0.05). Spanish-speaking respondents were more likely to prefer pediatric patients receiving a small monetary gift for participating in clinical research (70%) than English-speaking respondents (30%, p < 0.05).

Conclusion: There was a significant association between preference for recruitment method and primary language spoken by the respondent. Further inquiry is required to understand these differences between English and Spanish speakers.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ijporl.2020.110108DOI Listing
August 2020
-->