Publications by authors named "Mikołaj Gołuński"

4 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Three-Dimensional Mass Spectrometric Imaging of Biological Structures Using a Vacuum-Compatible Microfluidic Device.

Anal Chem 2020 10 16;92(20):13785-13793. Epub 2020 Sep 16.

Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, Washington 99354, United States.

Three-dimensional (3D) molecular imaging of biological structures is important for a wide range of research. In recent decades, secondary-ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) has been recognized as a powerful technique for both two-dimensional and 3D molecular imaging. Sample fixations (e.g., chemical fixation and cryogenic fixation methods) are necessary to adapt biological samples to the vacuum condition in the SIMS chamber, which has been demonstrated to be nontrivial and less controllable, thus limiting the wider application of SIMS on 3D molecular analysis of biological samples. Our group recently developed liquid SIMS that offers great opportunities for the molecular study of various liquids and liquid interfaces. In this work, we demonstrate that a further development of the vacuum-compatible microfluidic device used in liquid SIMS provides a convenient freeze-fixation of biological samples and leads to more controllable and convenient 3D molecular imaging. The special design of this new vacuum-compatible liquid chamber allows an easy determination of sputter rates of ice, which is critical for calibrating the depth scale of frozen biological samples. Sputter yield of a 20 keV Ar ion on ice has been determined as 1500 (±8%) water molecules per Ar ion, consistent with our results from molecular dynamics simulations. Moreover, using the information of ice sputter yield, we successfully conduct 3D molecular imaging of frozen homogenized milk and observe network structures of interesting organic and inorganic species. Taken together, our results will significantly benefit various research fields relying on 3D molecular imaging of biological structures.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1021/acs.analchem.0c02204DOI Listing
October 2020

Hypervelocity cluster ion impacts on free standing graphene: Experiment, theory, and applications.

J Chem Phys 2019 Apr;150(16):160901

Department of Chemistry, Texas A&M University, College Station, Texas 77843-3144, USA.

We present results from experiments and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations obtained with C and Au impacting on free-standing graphene, graphene oxide (GO), and graphene-supported molecular layers. The experiments were run on custom-built ToF reflectron mass spectrometers with C and Au-LMIS sources with acceleration potentials generating 50 keV C and 440-540 keV Au. Bombardment-detection was in the same mode as MD simulation, i.e., a sequence of individual projectile impacts with separate collection/identification of the ejecta from each impact in either the forward (transmission) or backward (reflection) direction. For C impacts on single layer graphene, the secondary ion (SI) yields for C and C emitted in transmission are ∼0.1 (10%). Similar yields were observed for analyte-specific ions from submonolayer deposits of phenylalanine. MD simulations show that graphene acts as a trampoline, i.e., they can be ejected without destruction. Another topic investigated dealt with the chemical composition of free-standing GO. The elemental composition was found to be approximately COH. We have also studied the impact of Au clusters on graphene. Again SI yields were high (e.g., 1.25 C/impact). 90-100 Au atoms evaporate off the exiting projectile which experiences an energy loss of ∼72 keV. The latter is a summation of energy spent on rupturing the graphene, ejecting carbon atoms and clusters and a dipole projectile/hole interaction. The charge distribution of the exiting projectiles is ∼50% neutrals and ∼25% either negatively or positively charged. We infer that free-standing graphene enables detection of attomole to zeptomole deposits of analyte via cluster-SI mass spectrometry.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1063/1.5080606DOI Listing
April 2019

"Trampoline" ejection of organic molecules from graphene and graphite via keV cluster ions impacts.

J Chem Phys 2018 Apr;148(14):144309

Department of Chemistry, Texas A&M University, College Station, Texas 77843-3144, USA.

We present the data on ejection of molecules and emission of molecular ions caused by single impacts of 50 keV C on a molecular layer of deuterated phenylalanine (D8Phe) deposited on free standing, 2-layer graphene. The projectile impacts on the graphene side stimulate the abundant ejection of intact molecules and the emission of molecular ions in the transmission direction. To gain insight into the mechanism of ejection, Molecular Dynamic simulations were performed. It was found that the projectile penetrates the thin layer of graphene, partially depositing the projectile's kinetic energy, and molecules are ejected from the hot area around the hole that is made by the projectile. The yield, Y, of negative ions of deprotonated phenylalanine, (D8Phe-H), emitted in the transmission direction is 0.1 ions per projectile impact. To characterize the ejection and ionization of molecules, we have performed the experiments on emission of (D8Phe-H) from the surface of bulk D8Phe (Y = 0.13) and from the single molecular layer of D8Phe deposited on bulk pyrolytic graphite (Y = 0.15). We show that, despite the similar yields of molecular ions, the scenario of the energy deposition and ejection of molecules is different for the case of graphene due to the confined volume of projectile-analyte interaction. The projectile impact on the graphene-D8Phe sample stimulates the collective radial movement of analyte atoms, which compresses the D8Phe layer radially from the hole. At the same time, this compression bends and stretches the graphene membrane around the hole thus accumulating potential energy. The accumulated potential energy is transformed into the kinetic energy of correlated movement upward for membrane atoms, thus the membrane acts as a trampoline for the molecules. The ejected molecules are effectively ionized; the ionization probability is ∼30× higher compared to that obtained for the bulk D8Phe target. The proposed mechanism of ionization involves tunneling of electrons from the vibrationally excited area around the hole to the molecules. Another proposed mechanism is a direct proton transfer exchange, which is suitable for a bulk target: ions of molecular fragments (i.e., CN) generated in the impact area interact with intact molecules from the rim of this area. There is a direct proton exchange process for the system D8Phe molecule + CN.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1063/1.5021352DOI Listing
April 2018

Adsorption of cationic organic dyes in suspended-core fibers.

Opt Lett 2015 Apr;40(8):1647-50

We report on the absorption measurements of the liquid-filled pure-silica microstructured optical fibers. The measurements concentrate on spectroscopic analysis of the water solutions of a cationic dye, oxazine 725 perchlorate which, when filling the fiber, demonstrates much stronger absorption signals than observed in bulk with regular cuvettes. The effect is also seen in another cationic dye, but not in anionic dyes. Our investigations reveal that the effect originates from the adsorption of the dye molecules on the fiber inner walls. This effect also significantly enhances the sensitivity of spectroscopic measurements enabling the detection of molecules at very low concentrations. In particular, the detection of a 1 nM concentration of oxazine 725 perchlorate was demonstrated.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1364/OL.40.001647DOI Listing
April 2015