Publications by authors named "Mikhail Enikeev"

15 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

hTERT, hTR and TERT promoter mutations as markers for urological cancers detection: A systematic review.

Urol Oncol 2021 Mar 3. Epub 2021 Mar 3.

Institute for Urology and Reproductive Health, Sechenov University, Moscow, Russia. Electronic address:

The clinical relevance of telomerase subunits (human reverse transcriptase - hTERT, and human telomerase RNA - hTR) and TERT promotor mutations as biomarkers in genitourinary cancers was reviewed through the systematic analysis of the current literature. We performed a systematic literature search using 2 databases (Medline and Scopus) over the past 20 years. Primary outcomes were sensitivity and specificity of hTR, hTERT and TERT promoter mutations. Secondary outcomes were the biomarkers predictive values for tumor characteristics. Regarding bladder cancer, hTERT in urine showed high sensitivity (mean values: 55%-96%), and specificity (69%-100%): it correlated with bladder cancer grade and/or stage. hTR sensitivity ranged from 77% to 92%. With adapted cut-off, it demonstrated 72% to 89% specificity. TERT promoter mutation rate was up to 80% both in tissue and urine, resulting in 62%-92% sensitivity for primary tumors and 42% for relapse. Specificity ranged from 73% to 96%, no correlations with stage were observed. In prostate cancer, hTERT in tissue, prostate secretion and serum showed high sensitivity (97.9%, 36%, and 79.2%-97.5%, respectively) and specificity values (70%, 66%, 60%-100%). hTR showed very high sensitivity (88% in serum and 100% in tissue) although specificity values were highly variable depending on the series and techniques (0%-96.5%). In RCC, hTERT sensitivity on tissue ranged from 90 to 97%, specificity from 25 to 58%. There was an association of hTERT expression with tumor stage and grade. hTERT showed high accuracy in genitourinary cancers, while the value of hTR was more controversial. hTERT and TERT promotor mutations may have predictive value for bladder cancer and RCC staging and grading, while no such relationship was observed in CaP. Although telomerase subunits showed clinically relevant values in genitourinary cancers, developing fast and cost-effective methods is required before contemplating routine use.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.urolonc.2021.01.022DOI Listing
March 2021

A systematic review of irreversible electroporation in localised prostate cancer treatment.

Andrologia 2020 Nov 12;52(10):e13789. Epub 2020 Aug 12.

Institute for Urology and Reproductive Health, Sechenov University, Moscow, Russia.

Irreversible electroporation is a treatment option used for focal therapy. In this systematic review, we summarise data on irreversible electroporation outcomes in patients with localised prostate cancer. We performed a literature search in 3 databases and included articles with own data on irreversible electroporation results in patients with localised prostate cancer. Primary outcome was procedure efficacy measured as the absence of cancer in the treatment area on the follow-up biopsy. Secondary outcomes were the absence of prostate cancer recurrence in the treatment area on MRI, out-of-field recurrence, complications and functional outcomes (erectile function and micturition). In-field recurrence rate was 0%-39% and out-field 6.4%-24%. In all studies, PSA level decreased: twice lower than baseline after 4 weeks and by 76% after 2 years. Most of the authors noted sexual and urinary toxicity during the first half year after surgery. However, functional outcomes recovered to baseline after 6 months with mild decrease in sexual function. Complication rates after irreversible electroporation were 0%-1% of Clavien-Dindo III and 5%-20% of Clavien-Dindo I-II. Irreversible electroporation has promise oncological outcomes, rate of post-operative complications and minimal-to-no effects on erectile and urinary function. However, medium and long-term data on cancer-specific and recurrence-free survival are still lacking.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/and.13789DOI Listing
November 2020

Extracorporeal ureter handling during laparoscopic pyeloplasty: tips and tricks for beginners.

Cent European J Urol 2019 6;72(4):413-417. Epub 2019 Dec 6.

Institute for Urology and Reproductive Health, Sechenov University, Moscow, Russia.

Introduction: Laparoscopic preparation of the ureter is a challenging part of upper urinary tract reconstruction, due to limited depth perception provided by the camera and lack of wristed motion of most laparoscopic instruments needed for adequate spatulation and scar tissue removal. One solution has been to perform the more difficult portions of the surgery in an extracorporeal manner. A hybrid intracorporeal-extracorporeal approach to upper tract ureteral reconstruction facilitates ureteral preparation at the stage of mastering the technique.

Material And Methods: This retrospective study included 100 patients with primary ureteropelvic junction obstruction, who underwent laparoscopic pyeloplasty from 2014 to 2017. The patients were stratified into 2 groups: those who underwent conventional laparoscopic surgery and those who were managed with the hybrid approach. For the hybrid approach, externalizing the ureter to skin level required additional mobilization of the upper urinary tract.

Results: A total of 47 patients underwent conventional laparoscopic pyeloplasty and 53 - hybrid surgery. The maximum body mass index was 32. The hybrid approach was 8.5 minutes shorter compared to the conventional approach (p <0.001). No complications higher than Clavien-Dindo IIIb (n = 2) were observed (in both groups). Complete success (the resolution of pain and/or hydronephrosis) was observed in 92.5% in the hybrid group and in 95.7% in the conventional treatment group.

Conclusions: Hybrid pyeloplasty may be considered safe and effective. It has the advantage of making the surgery less challenging and time-consuming while offering improved precision. The advantages of the technique are particularly apparent during training. This technique can be recommended in the learning process of the surgeon.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.5173/ceju.2019.0022DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6979559PMC
December 2019

How Lasers Ablate Stones: Study of Laser Lithotripsy (Ho:YAG and Tm-Fiber Lasers) in Different Environments.

J Endourol 2021 Jun 29;35(6):931-936. Epub 2020 Jan 29.

Institute for Urology and Reproductive Health, Sechenov University, Moscow, Russia.

There are two main mechanisms of stone ablation with long-pulsed infrared lasers: photothermal and photomechanical. Which of them is primary in stone destruction is still a matter of discussion. Water holds importance in both mechanisms but plays a major role in the latter. We sought to identify the prevailing mechanism of stone ablation by evaluating the stone mass loss after lithotripsy in different media. We tested a holmium:yttrium-aluminum-garnet (Ho:YAG) laser (100 W; Lumenis), a thulium-fiber laser U1 (TFL U1) (120 W; NTO IRE-Polus, Russia), and a SuperPulse thulium-fiber laser U2 (TFL U2) (500 W; NTO IRE-Polus). A single set of laser parameters (15 W = 0.5 J × 30 Hz) was used. Contact lithotripsy was performed in phantoms (BegoStones) in different settings: (a) hydrated phantoms in water, (b) hydrated phantoms in air, (c) dehydrated phantoms in water, and (d) dehydrated phantoms in air. Laser ablation was performed with total energy of 0.3 kJ. Phantom mass loss was defined as the difference between the initial phantom mass and the final phantom mass of the ablated phantoms. All lasers demonstrated effective ablation in hydrated phantoms ablated in water; no visual differences between the lasers were detected. The ablation of dehydrated phantoms in air was also effective with visible vapor during ablation and condensation on the cuvette wall. Dehydrated phantoms in water and in air show minimal to no ablation accompanied with formation of white crust on phantom surface. Among laser types, TFL U2 had the highest phantom mass loss in all groups except for dehydrated phantoms ablated in air. Our results suggest that both photothermal and thermomechanical ablation mechanisms (explosive vaporization) occur in parallel during laser lithotripsy. In Ho:YAG and TFL U2 stone ablation explosive vaporization prevails, whereas in TFL U1 ablation photothermal mechanism appears to predominate.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1089/end.2019.0441DOI Listing
June 2021

Repair of cystocele and apical genital prolapse using 6-strap mesh implant.

Urologia 2020 Aug 16;87(3):130-136. Epub 2019 Dec 16.

Institute for Urology and Reproductive Health, Sechenov University, Moscow, Russia.

Objective: To assess the outcomes of surgical repair of anterior apical prolapse using the 6-strap mesh implant.

Study Design: The prospective study included 100 patients with genitourinary prolapse. We used advanced 6-strap mesh implant. The results were assessed at 1 (n = 100) and 12 (n = 93) months after surgery. Maximum follow-up was over 4 years. The anatomical outcomes according to the Pelvic Organ Prolapse Quantification system and intraoperative and postoperative complications were assessed. Stage II and higher prolapse was considered to be a recurrence. The quality of life and sexual function were assessed using Pelvic Organ Prolapse Distress Inventory 20, Pelvic Floor Impact Questionnaire 7, and Pelvic Organ Prolapse/Incontinence Sexual Questionnaire 12.

Results: Median age was 57 years (34-78 years (95% confidence interval)). All patients had stage III cystocele. The anterior vaginal wall descent in all the patients was associated with uterine descent: 37 (37%), stage II; 60 (60%), stage III; in 3 (3%), stage IV. In eight cases, postoperative de novo stress urinary incontinence developed. The quality of life improved in 93 (93%) women as judged by the Pelvic Floor Distress Inventory 20 data and in 87 (87%) women, according to the Pelvic Floor Impact Questionnaire 7 data. The desirable anatomical result (⩽stage I according to the Pelvic Organ Prolapse Quantification system) was achieved in 97 (97%) patients. With the exception of mesh fragment excision due to erosion (grade 3a), all the complications were classified as grade I according to the Clavien-Dindo classification.

Conclusion: Genitourinary prolapse repair using 6-strap mesh is efficacious and relatively safe. The method demonstrates good anatomical results in relation to both anterior and apical prolapses with relatively short-term complications.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0391560319890999DOI Listing
August 2020

Retrospective Assessment of Endoscopic Enucleation of Prostate Complications: A Single-Center Experience of More Than 1400 Patients.

J Endourol 2020 02;34(2):192-197

Institute for Urology and Reproductive Health, Sechenov University, Moscow, Russia.

Endoscopic enucleation of the prostate (EEP) is a safe method of treating benign prostatic hyperplasia, regardless of prostate volume and type of applied energy. To date, however, there has been no study that examines complication rates with respect to the type of applied energy. This study aims to address this problem by providing a retrospective analysis of >1400 patients who have undergone prostate enucleation. We performed a retrospective analysis of all patients undergoing EEP between 2013 and 2018 at a single tertiary institution. This analysis included patients who had undergone one of three forms of EEP: holmium laser enucleation of the prostate (HoLEP), thulium fiber laser enucleation of the prostate (ThuFLEP), or monopolar enucleation of the prostate (MEP). We compared intraoperative and early postoperative complications, as well as complications at 3 and 6 months follow-up. A total of 1413 patients were included in this study; 36% patients underwent HoLEP, 57.5% had ThuFLEP, and 6.5% MEP. The most frequent complication in the early postoperative period was a mild fever (2.76% of the cases). The morcellation was delayed to a separate stage because of intensive hemorrhaging in 1.4% of the cases. Bladder tamponade was found in 1.1% of the cases. We found no correlation between complication rate and either prostate volume or energy source. Stress urinary incontinence was found in 3.9% of patients at 3 months and in only 1.4% of patients at 6 months after the operation. Urethral stricture at 6 months after the surgery was found in 1.4% of patients, whereas bladder neck sclerosis was found in only 0.9% of these cases. No significant difference was observed between these complication frequencies and any preoperative factors or energy source. All EEP types are safe with equal rates of complications intraoperatively, postoperatively, and at 6 months follow-up.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1089/end.2019.0630DOI Listing
February 2020

Pathologic response and surgical outcomes in patients undergoing nephrectomy following receipt of immune checkpoint inhibitors for renal cell carcinoma.

Urol Oncol 2019 12 12;37(12):924-931. Epub 2019 Sep 12.

Department of Urology, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX. Electronic address:

Objective: To evaluate the pathologic response, safety, and feasibility of nephrectomy following receipt of immune checkpoint inhibition (ICI) for renal cell carcinoma (RCC).

Methods: Patients who underwent nephrectomy for RCC after exposure to nivolumab monotherapy or combination ipilimumab/nivolumab were reviewed. Primary surgical outcomes included operative time (OT), estimated blood loss (EBL), length of stay (LOS), readmission rates, and complication rates. Pathologic response in the primary and metastatic sites constituted secondary outcomes.

Results: Eleven nephrectomies (10 radical, 1 partial) were performed in 10 patients after ICI with median postoperative follow-up 180 days. Six patients received 1 to 4 cycles of ipilimumab/nivolumab, while 5 received 2 to 12 infusions of nivolumab preoperatively. Five surgeries were performed laparoscopically, and 4 patients underwent concomitant thrombectomy. One patient exhibited complete response (pT0) to ICI, and 3/4 patients who underwent metastasectomy for hepatic, pulmonary, or adrenal lesions exhibited no detectable malignancy in any of the metastases resected. No patients experienced any major intraoperative complications, and all surgical margins were negative. Median OT, EBL, and LOS were 180 minutes, 100 ml, and 4 days, respectively. Four patients experienced a complication, including 3 that were addressed with interventional radiology procedures. One patient died of progressive disease >3 months after surgery, and 1 patient succumbed to pulmonary embolism complicated by sepsis. No complications or readmissions were noted in 6 patients.

Conclusion: Nephrectomy following ICI for RCC is safe and technically feasible with favorable surgical outcomes and pathologic response. Timing of the nephrectomy relative to checkpoint dosing did not seem to impact outcome. Biopsies of lesions responding radiographically to ICI may warrant attention prior to surgical excision.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.urolonc.2019.08.012DOI Listing
December 2019

Ex vivo and animal study of the blue diode laser, Tm fiber laser, and their combination for laparoscopic partial nephrectomy.

Lasers Surg Med 2020 06 13;52(5):437-448. Epub 2019 Sep 13.

IPG Medical, 377 Simarano Dr., Marlborough, Massachusetts, 01752.

Background And Objectives: To evaluate the feasibility of using a novel blue diode laser (blue laser), a thulium fiber laser (Tm laser), and their combination as a directed-energy surgical tool in laparoscopic partial nephrectomy (LPN).

Study Design/materials And Methods: The blue laser emitting at 442 nm, the Tm laser emitting at 1,940 nm wavelengths, and the combination of them were tested. First, cutting and coagulative abilities of the lasers were characterized ex vivo on porcine kidney in air and CO . Histological staining was performed to assess the efficiency of ablation and coagulation. Next, experimental LPN was performed on a porcine model at zero ischemia. Upper and lower segments of both kidneys were resected. Total operation time and resection time were measured; bleeding and carbonization were evaluated.

Results: Ex vivo data show that laser-induced ablation and coagulation processes do not differ substantially between CO and air environments. Histological analysis of ex vivo incisions demonstrates that the blue laser produced deep ablation with relatively narrow coagulation zone, whereas Tm laser was less efficient in terms of ablation but possessed excellent coagulative properties. Experimental LPN revealed that the blue laser provided fast cutting with minimal carbonization, whereas Tm laser induced slow cutting with strong carbonization. The combination of the blue and Tm lasers provided the most promising results demonstrating the highest resection rate, almost carbonization free resection surface and clinically acceptable hemostasis enabling LPN without the need for vessel clamping.

Conclusions: The blue laser can be efficiently utilized in LPN. Furthermore, the combination of the blue and Tm lasers into a single modality may be beneficial for further development of successful laser-assisted LPN. Lasers Surg. Med. © 2019 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/lsm.23158DOI Listing
June 2020

Novel Thulium Fiber Laser for Enucleation of Prostate: A Retrospective Comparison with Open Simple Prostatectomy.

J Endourol 2019 01;33(1):16-21

1 Institute of Urology and Reproductive Health, Sechenov University, Moscow, Russia.

Introduction: The objective of this study was to assess the efficacy and safety of novel thulium fiber laser enucleation of the prostate (ThuFLEP) vs conventional open simple retropubic prostatectomy (OP) for large volume benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH).

Methods: We performed a retrospective review of patients who underwent surgical treatment for large volume BPH (>80 cc) from 2015 to 2017. Preoperative patient examination included the assessment of functional parameters: International Prostate Symptom Score (IPSS), quality of life (QoL), maximum urine flow rate (Q), and postvoid residual urine volume. The hemoglobin level was measured before and after the operation.

Results: A total of 130 patients were included in the study. Of these, 40 patients underwent OP, and 90 patients underwent ThuFLEP. Groups were similar in terms of preoperative functional parameters (IPSS, QoL, and Q). The mean operative time was comparable for both procedures (p = 0.285) as well as the mass of adenomatous tissue resected (p = 0.412). Resection speed was comparable (OP-0.9 vs ThuFLEP-1.0 g/min, p = 0.52). Patients in OP had significantly longer catheterization time and length of hospital stay (9.0 days vs 3.3 days, p < 0.001). At 6 months, stress urinary incontinence rate were 1.1% after ThuFLEP and 2.5% after OP.

Conclusions: Despite the equally high efficacy of both modalities for infravesical obstruction due to BPH, ThuFLEP is a minimally invasive modality that is associated with a shorter hospital stay, a significantly greater return to normal activities, and a considerable reduction in rehabilitation time. Our results demonstrated that the ThuFLEP is a highly efficacious, minimally invasive modality for the management of BPH in large volume glands (>80 cc).
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1089/end.2018.0791DOI Listing
January 2019

Impact of endoscopic enucleation of the prostate with thulium fiber laser on the erectile function.

BMC Urol 2018 Oct 12;18(1):87. Epub 2018 Oct 12.

Institute for Urology and Reproductive Health, Sechenov University, Moscow, Russia.

Background: The impact of number of endoscopic enucleation of the prostate techniques (holmium laser enucleation - HoLEP for example) on erectile function have already been investigated. However, the thulium-fiber laser, in this setting remains unstudied. In this study, we compared sexual function outcomes in patients with benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) treated with transurethral resection of the prostate (TURP) or thulium-fiber laser enucleation (ThuFLEP).

Methods: We performed a retrospective analysis of patients who underwent transurethral resection and endoscopic enucleation of the prostate for BPH; inclusion criteria was the presence of infravesical obstruction (IPSS > 20, Qmax < 10 mL/s). Erectile function (EF) was assessed using the International Index of Erectile Function (IIEF-5) both prior to endoscopic examination, and six months after.

Results: A total of 469 patients with BPH were included in the study; of these, 211 underwent to ThuFLEP, and 258 TURP. Preoperative IIEF-5 in TURP and ThuFLEP groups were 11.7 (±4.5) and 11.1 (±5.0), respectively (p = 0.17). At six month the IIEF-5 score was unchanged (p = 0.26 and p = 0.08) and comparable in both groups (p = 0.49). However, mean IIEF-5 score shown significant increase of 0.72 in ThuFLEP group, comparing to decrease of 0.24 in TURP patients (p < 0.001).

Conclusions: Both TURP and ThuFLEP are effective modalities in the management of infravesical obstruction due to BPH. At six months follow-up after surgery, both techniques lead to comparable IIEF-5 score. However, our results demonstrated that the ThuFLEP is more likely to preserve the erectile function leading to increase of IIEF-5 at six months in contrast to TURP which lead to slight drop in IIEF-5 score.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12894-018-0400-1DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6186032PMC
October 2018

A Randomized Trial Comparing The Learning Curve of 3 Endoscopic Enucleation Techniques (HoLEP, ThuFLEP, and MEP) for BPH Using Mentoring Approach-Initial Results.

Urology 2018 11 24;121:51-57. Epub 2018 Jul 24.

Sechenov University, Research Institute for Uronephrology and Reproductive Health, Russian Federation.

Objective: To assess the differences in the learning curve associated with different techniques of endoscopic enucleation of the prostate.

Materials And Methods: Ninety patients were randomly assigned into 3 groups (30 patients in each): HoLEP, ThuFLEP or MEP. Inclusion criteria for the study included prostate volume <80 cc, IPSS > 20, or Qmax < 10. The EEPs were performed by 3 surgeons experienced in transurethral resection of the prostate. Assignment of surgeons to surgical technique was also randomized. None of the surgeons had prior experience in EEP.

Results: ThuFLEP was slightly superior (with no significant difference [P > .05]) to HoLEP and MEP in terms of overall enucleation rate-1.0 g/min vs 0.8 g/min and 0.7 g/min, respectively. We observed similar enucleation rates at the initial stages of training (first 20 surgeries) with insignificant increase in ThuFLEP efficiency. At next 10 surgeries ThuFLEP and HoLEP efficiency were higher than of MEP (P < .001) without significant difference between techniques of laser EEP (P = .07).

Conclusion: Endoscopic enucleation of the prostate can be adopted safely and effectively within 30 surgeries if the technique is learned with a mentoring approach. EEP is shown to be safe and effective even in the initial stages of learning. Laser EEP (HoLEP, ThuFLEP) appears to lend itself to quicker adaptation compared MEP.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.urology.2018.06.045DOI Listing
November 2018

Retrospective Analysis of Short-Term Outcomes After Monopolar Versus Laser Endoscopic Enucleation of the Prostate: A Single Center Experience.

J Endourol 2018 05 13;32(5):417-423. Epub 2018 Mar 13.

1 Research Institute for Uronephrology and Reproductive Health, I.M. Sechenov First Moscow State Medical University (Sechenov University) , Moscow, Russia .

Introduction: Endoscopic enucleation of the prostate (EEP) has been recognized as a viable treatment modality for men with benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH). The aim of our study was to compare the efficacy and functional outcomes of three different techniques of EEP, including monopolar enucleation (MEP), holmium laser enucleation of the prostate (HoLEP), and thulium laser enucleation of the prostate (ThuLEP).

Methods: The study consisted of a retrospective comparison of pre- and postoperative parameters in men undergoing three types of EEP: MEP, HoLEP, and ThuLEP. Functional parameters were evaluated before and 6 months after surgery, which included the International Prostate Symptom Score, maximum flow rate, postvoid residual volume, prostate volume, and sodium levels of all patients.

Results: A total of 551 men with the mean age of 67.1 years were included in the study. Of these, MEP was performed on 95 patients, HoLEP was performed on 254 patients, and ThuLEP on 202 patients. The mean mass of morcellated tissue obtained during the three techniques did not differ significantly (p > 0.05). Mean procedure times of ThuLEP and HoLEP were shorter than MEP demonstrating 72, 76, and 86 minutes, respectively (p < 0.01). The mean catheterization time following laser EEPs was shorter than MEP as shown by 1.3, 1.3, and 3.8 days, respectively (p < 0.01). Hospital stay times of HoLEP and ThuLEP were shorter than MEP demonstrated by 3.3, 3.4, and 6.9 days, respectively (p < 0.01). Patients after MEP had significant decrease in postoperative hemoglobin and sodium levels. All the groups showed statistically significant improvement in the aforementioned parameters following treatment.

Conclusions: Both techniques of laser enucleation proved to be efficacious in the management of BPH. MEP of the prostate seems to be a highly promising addition to the list of enucleation techniques and was determined to be an effective and acceptable procedure, despite a higher complication rate.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1089/end.2017.0898DOI Listing
May 2018

Imaging technologies in the diagnosis and treatment of acute pyelonephritis.

Urologia 2017 Aug 18;84(3):179-184. Epub 2017 May 18.

 Department of Urology, I.M. Sechenov First State Medical University, Moscow - Russia.

Purpose: The aim of this study was to evaluate the possibilities of ultrasound, computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in diagnosing acute pyelonephritis (AP) and renal abscess.

Patients And Methods: Two hundred and seven patients with AP were followed up from 2010 throughout 2015. All the patients were divided into three groups. Group 1 included 113 (54.6%) patients with acute nonobstructive pyelonephritis; group 2 included 33 (15.9%) patients with acute obstructive pyelonephritis; and group 3 included 61 (29.5%) pregnant female patients with AP.All 207 patients with AP underwent ultrasound examination of the kidneys. Computed tomography (CT) was performed in 87 patients (42.0%). MRI was performed in 14 patients (6.7%).

Results: We identified the ultrasound (US), magnetic resonance (MR), and CT-signs of acute renal inflammation at different stages of the process.The main us-signs were decreased mobility of the kidney, its enlargement, thickened parenchyma, hydrophilic parenchyma and an impairment of corticomedullary differentiation.The typical CT-signs of AP were enlargement of the kidney with its thickened parenchyma and an impairment of corticomedullary differentiation.The main MR-signs of AP were enlargement of the kidney (>12 cm lengthwise), thickened parenchyma (<2 cm in the median segment of the kidney) and an impairment of corticomedullary differentiation.

Conclusions: Assessment of the structural and functional state of renal parenchyma and the upper urinary tract using techniques such as ultrasonography, CT, MRI contributes to more efficacious treatment of patients at different stages of AP and timely drainage with properly adjusted pathogenetic therapy at the infiltrative stage is instrumental in preventing purulent destructive forms of AP.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.5301/uj.5000234DOI Listing
August 2017

Percutaneous US-guided renal cryoablation using 3D modeling.

Urologia 2017 Aug 10;84(3):174-178. Epub 2017 May 10.

Research Institute of Uronephrology and Human Reproductive Health, I.M. Sechenov First Moscow State Medical University, Moscow - Russia.

Introduction: The article describes the first experience of performing percutaneous ultrasound (US)-guided cryoablation of renal tumor and assesses the safety and short-term results of treatment.

Materials And Methods: Twelve patients were subjected to US-guided cryoablation of renal tumor in 2015. The tumor size in 11 patients was up to 3.0 cm (T1а); in one female patient, 4.5 cm (T1b). Tumors were assessed according to the PADUA score. In eight patients, it was 6-7 (low); in three patients, 8-9 (average); in one, 10 (high). All the patients underwent US examination using a FlexFocus 800 apparatus with convex abdominal transducers. Before surgery and 6 months later, all the patients underwent renal Doppler US and contrast-enhanced computed tomography.

Results: The average cryoablation time was 60 min. Seven operations were performed under spinal anesthesia and five operations under local anesthesia. The follow-up period lasted 8 months on average. According to the ultrasonography and Doppler findings, after 6 months, the tumor (T1a) in 11 patients reduced in size by an average of 7-8 mm and had no blood supply.T1b patient's mass size reduces from 4.5 to 3.7 cm; however, a 1.5 cm area with a high attenuation gradient of the contrast medium was visualized. Later, the patient was subjected to laparoscopic renal resection. Histological finding revealed clear-cell carcinoma.

Conclusions: We consider percutaneous US-guided cryoablation as a method of choice for patients with stage T1a renal tumor localized on the posterior or lateral surface in the inferior or middle segment without sinus involvement and PADUA <9.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.5301/uj.5000231DOI Listing
August 2017

Holmium laser enucleation of the prostate (HoLEP) for small, large and giant prostatic hyperplasia: tips and tricks.

Urologia 2017 Aug 10;84(3):169-173. Epub 2017 May 10.

Research Institute of Uronephrology and Reproductive Health, I.M. Sechenov First Moscow State Medical University, Moscow - Russia.

Introduction: Holmium laser enucleation of the prostate (HoLEP) allows to treat extremely large prostates (>200 cm3). The aim of the study was to compare the efficiency of HoLEP for prostates of different sizes.

Methods: Four hundred and fifty-nine patients were divided into three groups: group 1 included 278 patients (<100 cm3); group 2 included 169 patients (100-200 cm3); group 3 included 12 patients (>200 cm3).

Results: The duration of enucleation in group 1 was 56.5 ± 10.7 min; in group 2 was 96.4 ± 24.9 min; in group 3 was 120.9 ± 35 min. The duration of morcellation in group 1 was 37.5 ± 7.3 min; in group 2 was 63.3 ± 11.2 min; in group 3 was 84.0 ± 25.6 min. The enucleation efficiency in group 3 (1.70 g/min) was higher (p<0.05) than in group 1 (1.05 g/min) and group 2 (1.23 g/min). Morcelation efficiency was lower in groups 1 and 2 (1.58 and 1.87 g/min, respectively) than in group 3 (2.45 g/min) (p<0.05).Follow-up period lasted 18 months. There were no significant differences (p>0.05) in International Prostate Symptom Score, Qmax, quality of life and postvoid residual volume for 1, 3, 6, 12 and 18 months after surgery.

Conclusions: HoLEP is a safe, highly efficacious and a size-independent procedure.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.5301/uj.5000232DOI Listing
August 2017