Publications by authors named "Mike Chapman"

6 Publications

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A 3D printed phantom to assess MRI geometric distortion.

Biomed Phys Eng Express 2021 Mar 3. Epub 2021 Mar 3.

Queensland University of Technology, 199 Ipswich Road, Brisbane, 4102, AUSTRALIA.

Magnetic Resonance has become a standard imaging modality for target volume delineation and treatment planning in radiation oncology. Geometric distortions, however, have the potential to detrimentally affect both tumour definition and the dose delivered to the target volume. We report the design, fabrication and imaging of a 3D printed unibody MR distortion phantom along with quantitative image analysis.

Methods: The internal cavity of the phantom is an orthogonal three-dimensional planar lattice, composed of 3mm diameter rods spaced equidistantly at a 20mm centre-centre offset repeating along the X, Y and Z axes. The phantom featured an overall length of 308.5 mm, a width of 246 mm and a height of 264 mm with lines on the external surface for phantom positioning matched to external lasers. The MR phantom was 3D printed in Nylon-12 using an advancement on traditional selective laser sintering (SLS) (HP Jet Fusion 3D - 4200 machine). The phantom was scanned on a Toshiba Aquilion CT scanner to check the integrity of the 3D print and to correct for any resultant issues. The phantom was then filled with NiSO4 solution and scanned on a 3T PET-MR Siemens scanner for selected T1 and T2 sequences, from which distortion vectors were generated and analysed using in-house software written in Python.

Results: All deviations were less than 1 mm, with an average displacement of 0.228 mm. The majority of the deviations are smaller than the 0.692 mm pixel size for this dataset.

Conclusion: A cost-effective, 3D printed MRI-phantom was successfully printed and tested for assessing geometric distortion on MRI scanners. The custom phantom with markings for phantom alignment may be considered for radiotherapy departments looking to add MR scanners for simulation and image guidance.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1088/2057-1976/abeb7eDOI Listing
March 2021

Thrombotic microangiopathy in untreated myeloma patients receiving carfilzomib, cyclophosphamide and dexamethasone on the CARDAMON study.

Br J Haematol 2021 Mar 1. Epub 2021 Mar 1.

Haematology Department, University College Hospitals, London, UK.

Proteasome inhibitors have been associated with thrombotic microangiopathy (TMA) - a group of disorders characterised by occlusive microvascular thrombosis causing microangiopathic haemolytic anaemia, thrombocytopenia and end-organ damage. To date, carfilzomib-associated TMA has predominantly been described in relapsed/refractory myeloma patients. We report eight patients with newly diagnosed myeloma who experienced TMA events while receiving carfilzomib on the phase II CARDAMON trial. The first three occurred during maintenance single-agent carfilzomib, two occurred at induction with carfilzomib given with cyclophosphamide and dexamethasone (KCd) and three occurred during KCd consolidation. At TMA presentation 6/8 were hypertensive; 7/8 had acute kidney injury and in three, renal impairment persisted after resolution of TMA in other respects. The mechanism of carfilzomib-associated TMA remains unclear, though patients with known hypertension seem particularly susceptible. Given the first three cases occurred during maintenance after a longer than five-week treatment break, a protocol amendment was instituted with: aggressive hypertension management, carfilzomib step-up dosing (20 mg/m on day 1) at start of maintenance before dose escalation to 56 mg/m maximum, and adding 10 mg dexamethasone as premedication to maintenance carfilzomib infusions. No further TMA events occurred during maintenance following this amendment and the TMA incidence reduced from 4·2 to 1·6 per 1 000 patient cycles.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bjh.17377DOI Listing
March 2021

Living with allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis.

Authors:
Mike Chapman

Breathe (Sheff) 2019 Jun;15(2):108-109

Aspergillosis Trust, Manchester, UK.

http://ow.ly/AyNI30oc4US.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1183/20734735.0170-2019DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6544785PMC
June 2019

Endoscopic retrograde pancreatography criteria to diagnose autoimmune pancreatitis: an international multicentre study.

Gut 2011 May 3;60(5):666-70. Epub 2010 Dec 3.

Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Mayo Clinic College of Medicine, Rochester, MN 55905, USA.

Background: Characteristic pancreatic duct changes on endoscopic retrograde pancreatography (ERP) have been described in autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP). The performance characteristics of ERP to diagnose AIP were determined.

Methods: The study was done in two phases. In phase I, 21 physicians from four centres in Asia, Europe and the USA, unaware of the clinical data or diagnoses, reviewed 40 preselected ERPs of patients with AIP (n=20), chronic pancreatitis (n=10) and pancreatic cancer (n=10). Physicians noted the presence or absence of key pancreatographic features and ranked the diagnostic possibilities. For phase II, a teaching module was created based on features found most useful in the diagnosis of AIP by the four best performing physicians in phase I. After a washout period of 3 months, all physicians reviewed the teaching module and reanalysed the same set of ERPs, unaware of their performance in phase I.

Results: In phase I the sensitivity, specificity and interobserver agreement of ERP alone to diagnose AIP were 44, 92 and 0.23, respectively. The four key features of AIP identified in phase I were (i) long (>1/3 the length of the pancreatic duct) stricture; (ii) lack of upstream dilatation from the stricture (<5 mm); (iii) multiple strictures; and (iv) side branches arising from a strictured segment. In phase II the sensitivity (71%) of ERP significantly improved (p<0.05) without a significant decline in specificity (83%) (p>0.05); the interobserver agreement was fair (0.40).

Conclusions: The ability to diagnose AIP based on ERP features alone is limited but can be improved with knowledge of some key features.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/gut.2010.207951DOI Listing
May 2011