Publications by authors named "Miho Miura"

9 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Seroprevalence of Severe Fever with Thrombocytopenia Syndrome Virus in Small-Animal Veterinarians and Nurses in the Japanese Prefecture with the Highest Case Load.

Viruses 2021 02 2;13(2). Epub 2021 Feb 2.

Center for Animal Disease Control, University of Miyazaki, Miyazaki 889-2192, Japan.

Severe fever with thrombocytopenia syndrome virus (SFTSV) is the causative agent of SFTS, an emerging tick-borne disease in East Asia, and is maintained in enzootic cycles involving ticks and a range of wild animal hosts. Direct transmission of SFTSV from cats and dogs to humans has been identified in Japan, suggesting that veterinarians and veterinary nurses involved in small-animal practice are at occupational risk of SFTSV infection. To characterize this risk, we performed a sero-epidemiological survey in small-animal-practice workers and healthy blood donors in Miyazaki prefecture, which is the prefecture with the highest per capita number of recorded cases of SFTS in Japan. Three small-animal-practice workers were identified as seropositive by ELISA, but one had a negative neutralization-test result and so was finally determined to be seronegative, giving a seropositive rate of 2.2% (2 of 90), which was significantly higher than that in healthy blood donors (0%, 0 of 1000; < 0.05). The seroprevalence identified here in small-animal-practice workers was slightly higher than that previously reported in other high-risk workers engaged in agriculture and forestry in Japan. Thus, enhancement of small-animal-practice workers' awareness of biosafety at animal hospitals is necessary for control of SFTSV.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/v13020229DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7912989PMC
February 2021

Direct Transmission of Severe Fever with Thrombocytopenia Syndrome Virus from Domestic Cat to Veterinary Personnel.

Emerg Infect Dis 2020 12;26(12):2994-2998

Two veterinary personnel in Japan were infected with severe fever with thrombocytopenia syndrome virus (SFTSV) while handling a sick cat. Whole-genome sequences of SFTSV isolated from the personnel and the cat were 100% identical. These results identified a nosocomial outbreak of SFTSV infection in an animal hospital without a tick as a vector.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid2612.191513DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7706950PMC
December 2020

Characteristics of Multidrug-Resistant Corynebacterium spp. Isolated from Blood Cultures of Hospitalized Patients in Japan.

Jpn J Infect Dis 2017 Mar 30;70(2):152-157. Epub 2016 Jun 30.

Graduate School of Health Care Sciences, Jikei Institute.

Corynebacterium is a genus consisting of Gram-positive, rod-shaped bacteria, that is wildly distributed in nature. We report the epidemiological characterization of Corynebacterium spp. isolated from blood specimens at the Kurume University Hospital, between June 2008 and November 2011. Twenty-two strains that were likely Corynebacterium spp. were isolated from 22 hospitalized patients, of which 12 (54.5%) were identified as Corynebacterium striatum. Minimum inhibitory concentration tests were performed after biochemical and genotypic identifications. Biofilm production was detected using a 96-well microplate assay. The dissemination of C. striatum was investigated using pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE). All strains showed the tendency to be resistant to multiple drugs except vancomycin. Fourteen (82.4%) strains, including 9 C. striatum strains were capable of producing biofilms. Four distinct PFGE patterns were detected among C. striatum strains; 6 of which were identified as dominant pattern A (defined in this study) and had high biofilm production ability. During the 3-year monitoring period, these strains might have repeatedly infected the patients or could have readily colonized the hospital environments. C. striatum appeared to be a potential risk factor for bloodstream infections in hospitalized patients. More surveillance and enhanced control strategies are necessary to decrease Corynebacterium spp. infections in hospitals.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.7883/yoken.JJID.2015.530DOI Listing
March 2017

Risk factors for and circumstances of needlestick and sharps injuries of doctors in operating rooms: A study focusing on surgeries using general anesthesia at Kurume University Hospital, Japan.

J Infect Chemother 2015 Dec 14;21(12):837-41. Epub 2015 Oct 14.

Division of Infection Control and Prevention, Kurume University Hospital, Kurume, Fukuoka 830-0011, Japan; Department of Infection Control and Prevention, Kurume University School of Medicine, Kurume, Fukuoka 830-0011, Japan.

Healthcare workers are exposed to serious infectious diseases via needlestick and sharps injuries. The operating room is a particularly important environment in which the risk for needlestick injuries is increased for surgical doctors. According to national surveillance studies, the proportion of needlestick and sharps injuries in operating rooms has been increasing for unknown reasons. In this study, we examined risk factors for and circumstances of injuries in operating rooms by combining and analyzing incidence reports and electronic records of every surgery in Kurume University Hospital (Kurume, Japan). The annual injury rate (reflecting the reporting rate) rose continuously from fiscal years 2007-2012. We conducted analyses focusing on surgeries that used general anesthesia, which accounted for 88.1% of the injuries. An analysis of the time of injury found that the number of injuries increased toward the end of the surgical procedure. A comparative analysis of surgeries by doctors who had experienced injury revealed risk for the injury increased when a procedure ended after 20:00. In addition, a comparative analysis of doctors with and without injury experience who had similar level of operating time per year revealed that the number of working years was not lower in the injured doctors. Although the data analyzed in this study were confined to one university hospital, our approach and these results will form a basis on which to consider more effective measures to prevent injury in operating rooms.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jiac.2015.08.012DOI Listing
December 2015

Potential drug interaction between warfarin and linezolid.

Intern Med 2015 15;54(5):459-64. Epub 2015 Jan 15.

Department of Pharmacy, Kurume University Hospital; Department of Infection Control and Prevention, Kurume University School of Medicine, Japan.

Objective: Warfarin is known to interact with many drugs; however, there are currently no descriptions of an interaction with linezolid in the literature. It was recently brought to our attention, however, that several warfarin-medicated patients have experienced an increase in the prothrombin time international normalized ratio (PT-INR) following the administration of linezolid. We therefore performed a retrospective survey in order to investigate the possibility of an interaction between warfarin and linezolid.

Methods: The survey items included age, gender, underlying disease, type of surgery, type of infectious disease, duration of linezolid administration, laboratory values and the dose of warfarin. The PT-INR was observed over time before treatment and at days 4 or 5 and 10, completion and one week after the end of concomitant therapy. Patients The subjects included six patients who were recovering from recent heart-related surgery.

Results: The PT-INR increased from 1.62±0.32 before concomitant linezolid administration to 3.00±0.83 at day 4 or 5 after concomitant administration (p<0.01) and significantly decreased from 1.65±0.45 at the completion of the regimen to 1.26±0.1 one week later (p<0.05). With respect to the relationship between the dose of warfarin and the PT-INR in five cases, the PT-INR increased following concomitant linezolid treatment in all cases.

Conclusion: Although it has been reported that linezolid does not influence the metabolism or protein binding of warfarin, our data showed potential drug interactions between warfarin and linezolid. Our data suggest that PT-INR monitoring after the completion of concomitant warfarin and linezolid therapy is important.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.2169/internalmedicine.54.3146DOI Listing
July 2015

Imported case of acute respiratory tract infection associated with a member of species nelson bay orthoreovirus.

PLoS One 2014 25;9(3):e92777. Epub 2014 Mar 25.

Influenza virus Research Center, National Institute of Infectious Diseases, Musashimurayama, Tokyo, Japan.

A Japanese man suffered from acute respiratory tract infection after returning to Japan from Bali, Indonesia in 2007. Miyazaki-Bali/2007, a strain of the species of Nelson Bay orthoreovirus, was isolated from the patient's throat swab using Vero cells, in which syncytium formation was observed. This is the sixth report describing a patient with respiratory tract infection caused by an orthoreovirus classified to the species of Nelson Bay orthoreovirus. Given the possibility that all of the patients were infected in Malaysia and Indonesia, prospective surveillance on orthoreovirus infections should be carried out in Southeast Asia. Furthermore, contact surveillance study suggests that the risk of human-to-human infection of the species of Nelson Bay orthoreovirus would seem to be low.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0092777PLOS
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3965453PMC
December 2014

Infection control for a methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus outbreak in an advanced emergency medical service center, as monitored by molecular analysis.

J Infect Chemother 2013 Oct 29;19(5):884-90. Epub 2013 Mar 29.

Division of Infectious Diseases, Department of Infectious Medicine, Kurume University School of Medicine, 67 Asahi-machi, Kurume, Fukuoka, 830-0011, Japan,

A methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) outbreak occurred in an advanced emergency medical service center between 2010 and 2011. Our objective was to evaluate the status of the MRSA outbreak, as monitored by molecular analysis. Twenty-eight MRSA strains were isolated from blood samples from 11 patients, from other specimens (pharynx, nasal cavity, etc.) from 12 patients, from two environmental samples, and from the skin, middle nasal meatus, and urine of one patient each from other wards. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) was performed to evaluate horizontal transmission. Molecular typing by PFGE showed that the 28 MRSA strains presented 7 patterns in total, and that 11 of the MRSA strains had the same PGFE pattern. Unselective use of intranasal mupirocin ointment, MRSA monitoring for new inpatients, and prevention of direct or indirect contact infection were performed. However, the number of inpatients with MRSA did not quickly decrease, and additional molecular typing by PFGE showed that 10 of 19 MRSA strains found (5 of 6 from blood, 5 of 13 from other specimens) were the same as those found previously. Lectures and ward rounds were performed repeatedly, and staff participation in ward rounds was suggested. Finally, the number of inpatients with MRSA significantly decreased more than 6 months after the intervention. Although the MRSA outbreak was thought to have ended, follow-up molecular typing by PFGE showed that horizontal transmission persisted. Our data suggest that various combinations of infection control measures are essential when dealing with an MRSA outbreak, and monitoring by molecular analysis using PFGE is useful to identify the status of the outbreak.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10156-013-0587-8DOI Listing
October 2013

Comparison of real-time reverse-transcription loop-mediated isothermal amplification and real-time reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction for detection of noroviruses in municipal wastewater.

J Biosci Bioeng 2011 Oct 6;112(4):369-72. Epub 2011 Aug 6.

Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of Miyazaki, Miyazaki 889-2192, Japan.

The monitoring of NVs in municipal wastewater by both real-time RT-LAMP and real-time RT-PCR, and the comparison of these two methods with respect to NV detection were carried out. The change in NVs detected by real-time RT-LAMP agreed well with that detected by real-time RT-PCR. In contrast, the correlation between the copy number determined by real-time RT-PCR and the threshold time (Tt) determined by real-time RT-LAMP obtained during monitoring was not significant (0.1
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jbiosc.2011.06.012DOI Listing
October 2011

Comparison of two control measures of weatherstripping in reducing blowing dust during hospital renovations.

J Infect Chemother 2010 Dec 28;16(6):431-5. Epub 2010 Oct 28.

Division of Biostatistics, Kurume University School of Medicine, 67 Asahi-machi, Kurume, Fukuoka 830-0011, Japan.

Hospital renovation projects pose risks of invasive infection by fungi from dust that is blown about during the period in question. Control measures to reduce the amount of dust during hospital renovation are thus necessary. Currently, no study has compared different control measures for effectiveness through more than one period of renovation. In this study, we examined the capacities of two control measures of weatherstripping (0.15 mm poly film and adhesive tape) to reduce the amount of blowing dust during two different hospital renovations (in 2008 and 2009). The amount of dust in the air of the hospital before and during the renovation was measured about once a week in both 2008 and 2009, and the between-year and within-year differences were tested. Our study revealed that the weatherstripping used in 2009 (adhesive tape) was significantly more effective than the measures taken in 2008 (0.15 mm poly film) to reduce the amount of dust during the renovations (p < 0.001), while in both years the amount of dust became significantly higher during the renovations than before the renovations. Differences in the effectiveness of weatherstripping during renovations between floors of the hospital were not significant in both 2008 and 2009. The number of Aspergillus-positive samples did not significantly increase compared with the number observed before the start of the hospital renovations (2006-2007) in 2008 and 2009, respectively. The weatherstripping potentially reduced the associated risk of airborne fungal infection.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10156-010-0173-2DOI Listing
December 2010