Publications by authors named "Miguel Arévalo-Astrada"

3 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Epilepsy surgery in stroke-related epilepsy.

Seizure 2021 May 5;88:116-124. Epub 2021 Apr 5.

Epilepsy Program, Department of Clinical Neurological Sciences, Schulich School of Medicine and Dentistry, Western University, 339 Windermere Rd. London, Ontario, Canada, N6A 5A5; Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Schulich School of Medicine and Dentistry, Western University, 339 Windermere Rd. London, Ontario, Canada, N6A 5A5; Neuro-Epidemiology Unit, Schulich School of Medicine and Dentistry, Western University, 339 Windermere Rd. London, Ontario, Canada, N6A 5A5. Electronic address:

Purpose: To provide a descriptive analysis on the presurgical evaluation and surgical management of a cohort of patients with stroke related epilepsy (SRE).

Methods: We retrospectively examined the clinical characteristics, results of non-invasive and invasive presurgical evaluation, surgical management and outcome of consecutive patients with drug-resistant SRE in our institution from January 1, 2013 to January 1, 2020.

Results: Twenty-one of 420 patients (5%) who underwent intracranial EEG (iEEG), resective epilepsy surgery and/or vagus nerve stimulation (VNS) placement, had SRE. Of 13 patients who had iEEG, the ictal onset (IO) was exclusively within the stroke lesion in only one patient. In five patients the IO was extra-lesional and in the remaining seven patients it included the stroke lesion as well as extra-lesional structures. The IO included the mesial temporal region in 11 of the 13 patients (85%). The posterior margin of the stroke lesion was always involved. Five patients underwent surgery without iEEG. In total, 10 patients underwent resective surgery, four VNS placement and two had both corpus callosotomy and VNS placement. Of the patients who had resective surgery, nine were Engel I or II at last follow up.

Conclusion: We found that seizures in patients with drug resistant SRE were more frequently originated in the mesial temporal region than in the stroke lesion itself. Despite the complex epileptic network underlying drug-resistant SRE, a thorough presurgical assessment and adequate use of surgical options can lead to excellent surgical outcomes.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.seizure.2021.04.002DOI Listing
May 2021

All that glitters: Contribution of stereo-EEG in patients with lesional epilepsy.

Epilepsy Res 2021 Feb 2;170:106546. Epub 2021 Jan 2.

Department of Clinical Neurological Sciences, Schulich School of Medicine and Dentistry, Western University, London, Ontario, Canada; Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Schulich School of Medicine and Dentistry, Western University, London, Ontario, Canada; Neuro-Epidemiology Unit, Schulich School of Medicine and Dentistry, Western University, London, Ontario, Canada. Electronic address:

Objective: To determine the contribution of stereo-EEG for localization purpose in patients with a visible lesion on MRI.

Background: Intracranial EEG is often used to localize the epileptogenic focus in patients with non-lesional focal epilepsy. Its role in cases where a lesion is visible on MRI can be even more complex and the relationship between the lesion and the seizure onset has rarely been addressed.

Methods: All consecutive patients between February 2013 and May 2018 who underwent stereo-EEG and had a lesion visible on MRI were included. We assessed the localization of the seizure onset and its relationship with the lesion. Clinical, radiological, and electrographic analyses were performed.

Results: Stereo-EEG revealed a seizure onset with either partial or no overlap with the lesion seen on MRI in 42 (56 %) of the 75 lesions included. Mesial temporal sclerosis was the only lesion type associated with an exclusively lesional seizure onset (p = 0.003).

Conclusion: Epilepsy surgery in MRI-positive cases should rely not only the results of lesions seen on MRI, which might be potentially misleading; SEEG is a gold standard method in these cases to define resective borders.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.eplepsyres.2020.106546DOI Listing
February 2021

Can we accurately lateralize the epileptogenic zone in patients who have seizure clusters? A study using stereo-electroencephalography.

Epilepsy Res 2020 10 23;166:106405. Epub 2020 Jun 23.

Department of Clinical Neurological Sciences, Schulich School of Medicine and Dentistry, Western University, London, Ontario, Canada; Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Schulich School of Medicine and Dentistry, Western University, London, Ontario, Canada; Neuro-epidemiology Unit, Schulich School of Medicine and Dentistry, Western University, London, Ontario, Canada. Electronic address:

Objective: To determine if the ictal onset recorded with stereoelectroencephalography (SEEG) during clusters of seizures is reliable to identify the laterality of the epileptogenic zone.

Background: In the presurgical evaluation of patients with focal drug-resistant epilepsy, the presence of bilateral ictal onset is usually associated with a poor surgical outcome. It has been reported that the laterality of seizures can be influenced during seizure clusters, although this remains controversial. Most studies have addressed this issue using scalp EEG which could erroneously determine the laterality of the ictal onset.

Methods: We examined all consecutive patients who underwent SEEG with bilateral hemispheric coverage at our institution between January 2013 and September 2018. We assessed the presence of seizure clusters (clinical or subclinical), their laterality by SEEG and the surgical outcome of the patients. A descriptive clinical and electrographic analysis was performed.

Results: Of 143 patients who underwent SEEG recordings, we identified only six patients who had bilateral ictal onset that went on to resective surgery. In all six patients the discordant seizures occurred during a seizure cluster. Three of these patients were seizure free at last follow up.

Conclusion: Discordant seizures obtained during a seizure cluster may not necessarily mean that the patient has bilateral epilepsy, and therefore a poor post-surgical outcome. Seizure clusters may not reliably lateralize the epileptogenic zone.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.eplepsyres.2020.106405DOI Listing
October 2020