Publications by authors named "Miguel Ángel Quevedo"

5 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Frequency and Characterization of Antimicrobial Resistance and Virulence Genes of Coagulase-Negative Staphylococci from Wild Birds in Spain. Detection of -Carrying Isolates.

Microorganisms 2020 Aug 29;8(9). Epub 2020 Aug 29.

Área de Bioquímica y Biología Molecular, Universidad de La Rioja, 26006 Logroño, Spain.

The objective of this study was to determine the prevalence and diversity of coagulase-negative staphylococci (CoNS) species from wild birds in Spain, as well as to analyze the antimicrobial resistance phenotype/genotype and the virulence gene content. During 2015-2016, tracheal samples of 242 wild birds were collected in different regions of Spain for staphylococci recovery. The species identification was performed using MALDI-TOF. The antimicrobial resistance phenotype and genotype was investigated by the disk diffusion method and by PCR, respectively. The presence of the virulence genes /-PV, , , , and was investigated by PCR. Moreover, CoNS carrying the gene were subjected to SCC typing. Of the tested animals, 60% were CoNS-carriers, and 173 CoNS isolates were recovered from the 146 positive animals, which belonged to 11 species, with predominance of ( = 118) and ( = 25). A total of 34% of CoNS isolates showed a multidrug resistance phenotype, and 42 -positive methicillin-resistant CoNS (MRCoNS) were detected. The isolates showed resistance to the following antimicrobials (percentage of resistant isolates/antimicrobial resistance genes detected): penicillin (49/ , ), cefoxitin (24/ ), erythromycin and/or clindamycin (92/ (B), (C), (43), (A), (C), (A), (B), (A) and (A)), gentamicin and/or tobramycin (5/ (6')-Ie-(2″)-Ia, (4')-Ia), streptomycin (12/), tetracycline (17/ (K), (L), (M)), ciprofloxacin (4), chloramphenicol (1/ ), fusidic acid (86/ , ) and trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole (1/ ). None of the isolates harbored the /-PV, , , and genes, but two isolates (1%) carried the gene. Wild birds are frequently colonized by CoNS species, especially . We identified scavenging on intensively produced livestock and feeding on landfills as risk factors for CoNS carriage. High proportions of MRCoNS and multidrug resistant CoNS were detected, which coupled with the presence of important virulence genes is of concern.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/microorganisms8091317DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7564563PMC
August 2020

Detection of MRSA of Lineages CC130-mecC and CC398-mecA and Staphylococcus delphini-lnu(A) in Magpies and Cinereous Vultures in Spain.

Microb Ecol 2019 Aug 29;78(2):409-415. Epub 2019 Jan 29.

Área de Bioquímica y Biología Molecular, Universidad de La Rioja, Madre de Dios 51, 26006, Logroño, Spain.

The aim of this study was to determine the carriage rate of coagulase-positive staphylococci (CoPS) in wild birds and to characterize recovered isolates. Tracheal samples from 324 wild birds, obtained in different Spanish regions during 2015-2016, were screened for CoPS carriage. The antimicrobial resistance profile and the virulence gene content were investigated. Molecular typing was performed by spa, agr, MLST, SCCmec, and S. delphini group classification. CoPS were recovered from 26 samples of wild birds (8.3%), and 27 isolates were further characterized. Two CoPS species were detected: S. aureus (n = 15; eight cinereous vultures and seven magpies) and S. delphini (n = 12; 11 cinereous vultures and one red kite). Thirteen S. aureus were methicillin-resistant (MRSA) and the remaining two strains were methicillin-susceptible (MSSA). Twelve MRSA were mecC-positive, typed as t843-ST1583/ST1945/ST1581/ST1571 (n = 11) and t1535-ST1945 (n = 1) (all of clonal-complex CC130); they were susceptible to the non-β-lactams tested. The remaining MRSA strain carried the mecA gene, was typed as t011-ST398-CC398-agrI-SCCmec-V, and showed a multiresistance phenotype. MSSA isolates were ascribed to lineages ST97-CC97 and ST425-CC425. All S. aureus lacked the studied virulence genes (lukS/F-PV, tst, eta, etb, and etd), and the IEC type E (with scn and sak genes) was detected in four mecC-positive and one MSSA isolates. S. delphini strains were methicillin-susceptible but showed resistance to at least one of the antimicrobials tested, with high penicillin (75%, with blaZ gene) and tetracycline [58%, with tet(K)± tet(L)] resistance rates. All S. delphini isolates presented the virulence genes lukS-I, siet, and se-int, and four carried the clindamycin-resistance lnu(A) gene.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00248-019-01328-4DOI Listing
August 2019

Using Farm Animal Welfare Protocols as a Base to Assess the Welfare of Wild Animals in Captivity-Case Study: Dorcas Gazelles ().

Animals (Basel) 2018 Jul 5;8(7). Epub 2018 Jul 5.

Parc Zoològic de Barcelona, Parc de la Ciutadella, s/n, 08003 Barcelona, Spain.

There is a lack of protocols specifically developed for the assessment of welfare of wild animals in captivity, even when it is known that providing good standards of welfare is important. The aim of this study was the development and the application of a protocol for the assessment of welfare in captive dorcas gazelles. The protocol was mainly developed taking into account the protocol for the assessment of welfare in cattle from the Welfare Quality project, the available literature of the biology of this species and the Husbandry Guidelines developed for captive breeding and management of this species. The protocol was specifically developed for dorcas gazelles and included four principles, 10 criteria and 23 animal and environmental-based indicators. To test its utility, this protocol was applied to five different groups of gazelles from three different zoos. Its application made possible to detect areas for improvement in all groups assessed.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/ani8070111DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6071001PMC
July 2018

Aggressive behavior and hair cortisol levels in captive Dorcas gazelles (Gazella dorcas) as animal-based welfare indicators.

Zoo Biol 2016 Nov 13;35(6):467-473. Epub 2016 Sep 13.

Facultat de Veterinària, Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona, Bellaterra (Barcelona), Spain.

Ensuring welfare in captive wild animal populations is important not only for ethical and legal reasons, but also to maintain healthy individuals and populations. An increased level of social behaviors such as aggression can reduce welfare by causing physical damage and chronic stress to animals. Recently, cortisol in hair has been advanced as a non-invasive indicator to quantify long-lasting stress in many species. The sensitivity of social behavior and hair cortisol concentration was evaluated in several groups of dorcas gazelles (Gazella dorcas). Four different groups of gazelles from three different zoos were observed and the expression of intra-specific affiliative and negative social behaviors was assessed across the different groups. Hair samples were taken from sub-groups of animals and analyzed for cortisol concentrations. Significant differences between groups of dorcas gazelles were found in frequency of negative social behavior and hair cortisol concentration. Despite the low sample size, these two parameters had a positive Spearman correlation coefficient (r  = +0.80, P = 0.20). These results suggest that hair cortisol levels are sensitive to differences in the social structure of dorcas gazelles. Zoo Biol. 35:467-473, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/zoo.21323DOI Listing
November 2016

[Disseminated histoplasmosis in a dorcas gazelle (Gazella dorcas neglecta) kept in captivity conditions in Spain].

Rev Iberoam Micol 2009 Jun;26(2):152-4

Instituto de Patología y Enfermedades Infecciosas, Málaga, y Centro de Enfermedades Infecciosas, Granada, España.

A 17 month old female gazelle dorca (Gazella dorcas neglecta), kept in captivity in a Spanish zoo, showed several symptoms of illness including fever, lethargy and behavioural changes. (X)-ray revealed ruminal "foreign bodies" and pneumonia with a nodular pattern. After surgical intervention, the animal died. At necropsy, histopathologic and microbiological findings were consistent with the diagnosis of disseminated histoplasmosis, with an inflammatory histological pattern associated with immunodepression in the animal, similar to those observed in patients with severe immunodeficiency (AIDS and others).
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/S1130-1406(09)70027-0DOI Listing
June 2009