Publications by authors named "Mickaël Ohana"

71 Publications

Intravenous Lobular Capillary Haemangioma (Pyogenic Granuloma) of the Superior Vena Cava: Case Report and Literature Review.

EJVES Vasc Forum 2021 24;50:32-36. Epub 2020 Dec 24.

Department of Vascular Surgery and Kidney Transplantation, University of Strasbourg, France.

Introduction: Intravascular lobular capillary haemangioma is a rare benign intravascular tumour, especially in large vessels. This is the report of a case and associated literature review.

Report And Literature Review: This is the report of the first case of an intravenous lobular capillary haemangioma (ILCH) of the superior vena cava (SVC). A 30 year old female presented with a collateral thoraco-abdominal venous circulation. Chest computed tomography angiography, thoracic magnetic resonance imaging, and positron emission tomography revealed an intraluminal SVC tumour extending from the left brachiocephalic venous trunk to the distal third of the SVC. No pre-operative biopsy was indicated. An tumour excision was performed, followed by reconstruction of the SVC with an L shaped, ringed polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) prosthesis. Histopathology revealed the presence of an ILCH with free margins. A review of the literature identified 64 cases of ILCH to date, all of which underwent total resection. When reported, no recurrences were found during follow up.

Discussion: In this case, the ePTFE reconstruction of the SVC must be checked regularly for any adverse events. Although ILCH is a benign tumour with no risk of recurrence, regular surveillance is advised.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ejvsvf.2020.12.021DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8074681PMC
December 2020

Radiomics in the evaluation of lung nodules: Intrapatient concordance between full-dose and ultra-low-dose chest computed tomography.

Diagn Interv Imaging 2021 Apr 11;102(4):233-239. Epub 2021 Feb 11.

Department of Diagnostic Imaging (Radio B), Hôpitaux Universitaires de Strasbourg, 67000 Strasbourg, France; IMAGeS Team, ICube Laboratory, 67412 Illkirch Graffenstaden, France.

Purpose: The purpose of this study was to retrospectively evaluate the quantitative and qualitative intrapatient concordance of pulmonary nodule risk assessment by commercially available radiomics software between full-dose (FD) chest-CT and ultra-low-dose (ULD) chest CT.

Materials And Methods: Between July 2013 and September 2015, 68 patients (52 men and16 women; mean age, 65.5±10.6 [SD] years; range: 35-87 years) with lung nodules≥5mm and<30mm who underwent the same day FD chest CT (helical acquisition; 120kV; automated tube current modulation) and ULD chest CT (helical acquisition; 135kV; 10mA fixed) were retrospectively included. Each nodule on each acquisition was assessed by a commercial radiomics software providing a similarity malignancy index (mSI), classifying it as "benign-like" (mSI<0.1); "malignant-like" (mSI>0.9) or "undetermined" (0.1≤mSI≤0.9). Intrapatient qualitative agreement was evaluated with weighted Cohen-Kappa test and quantitative agreement with intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC).

Results: Ninety-nine lung nodules with a mean size of 9.14±4.3 (SD) mm (range: 5-25mm) in 68 patients (mean 1.46 nodule per patient; range: 1-5) were assessed; mean mSI was 0.429±0.331 (SD) (range: 0.001-1) with FD chest CT (22/99 [22%] "benign-like", 67/99 [68%] "undetermined" and 10/99 [10%] "malignant-like") and mean mSI was 0.487±0.344 (SD) (range: 0.002-1) with ULD chest CT (20/99 [20%] "benign-like", 59/99 [60%] "undetermined" and 20/99 [20%] "malignant-like"). Qualitative and quantitative agreement of FD chest CT with ULD chest CT were "good" with Kappa value of 0.60 (95% CI: 0.46-0.74) and ICC of 0.82 (95% CI: 0.73-0.87), respectively.

Conclusion: A good agreement in malignancy similarity index can be obtained between ULD chest CT and FD chest CT using radiomics software. However, further studies must be done with more case material to confirm our results and elucidate the diagnostic capabilities of radiomics software using ULD chest CT for lung nodule characterization by comparison with FD chest CT.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.diii.2021.01.010DOI Listing
April 2021

Predictors of negative first SARS-CoV-2 RT-PCR despite final diagnosis of COVID-19 and association with outcome.

Sci Rep 2021 01 27;11(1):2388. Epub 2021 Jan 27.

Pneumologie, University Hospital Center Avicenne, AP-HP, Bobigny, France.

Reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) testing is an important tool for diagnosing coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). However, performance concerns have emerged recently, notably regarding sensitivity. We hypothesized that the clinical, biological, and radiological characteristics of patients with a false-negative first RT-PCR test and a final diagnosis of COVID-19 might differ from those of patients with a positive first RT-PCR test. We conducted a multicenter matched case-control study in COVID-19 patients. Patients with a negative first RT-PCR test were matched to patients with a positive first RT-PCR test on age, sex, and initial admission unit (ward or intensive care). We included 80 cases and 80 controls between March 30, and June 22, 2020. Neither mortality at hospital discharge nor hospital stay length differed between the two groups (P = 0.80 and P = 0.54, respectively). By multivariate analysis, two factors were independently associated with a lower risk of a first false-negative test, namely, headache (adjusted OR [aOR], 0.07; 95% confidence interval [95% CI], 0.01-0.49]; P = 0.007) and fatigue/malaise (aOR, 0.16; 95% CI, 0.03-0.81; P = 0.027); two other factors were independently associated with a higher risk of a first false-negative test, namely, platelets > 207·10 mm (aOR, 3.81; 95% CI, 1.10-13.16]; P = 0.034) and C-reactive protein > 79.8 mg·L (aOR, 4.00; 95% CI, 1.21-13.19; P = 0.023). Patients with suspected COVID-19 whose laboratory tests indicating marked inflammation were at higher risk of a first false-negative RT-PCR test. Strategies involving serial RT-PCR testing must be rigorously evaluated.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41598-021-82192-6DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7840684PMC
January 2021

Higher anticoagulation targets and risk of thrombotic events in severe COVID-19 patients: bi-center cohort study.

Ann Intensive Care 2021 Jan 25;11(1):14. Epub 2021 Jan 25.

Service de Médecine Intensive Réanimation, Nouvel Hôpital Civil, Hôpitaux Universitaires de Strasbourg, 1, Place de l'Hôpital, 67091, Strasbourg Cedex, France.

Background: Thromboprophylaxis of COVID-19 patients is a highly debated issue. We aimed to compare the occurrence of thrombotic/ischemic events in COVID-19 patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) treated with either prophylactic or therapeutic dosage of heparin. All patients referred for COVID-19 ARDS in two intensive care units (ICUs) from two centers of a French tertiary hospital were included in our cohort study. Patients were compared according to their anticoagulant treatment to evaluate the risk/benefit of prophylactic anticoagulation versus therapeutic anticoagulation. Medical history, symptoms, biological data and imaging were prospectively collected.

Results: One hundred and seventy-nine patients (73% men) were analyzed: 108 in prophylactic group and 71 in therapeutic group. Median age and SAPS II were 62 [IQR 51; 70] years and 47 [IQR 37; 63] points. ICU mortality rate was 17.3%. Fifty-seven patients developed clinically relevant thrombotic complications during their ICU stay, less frequently in therapeutic group (adjusted OR 0.38 [0.14-0.94], p = 0.04). The occurrences of pulmonary embolism (PE), deep vein thrombosis (DVT) and ischemic stroke were significantly lower in the therapeutic group (respective adjusted OR for PE: 0.19 [0.03-0.81]; DVT: 0.13 [0.01-0.89], stroke: 0.06 [0-0.68], all p < 0.05). The occurrence of bleeding complications was not significantly different between groups, neither were ICU length of stay or mortality rate. D-dimer levels were significantly lower during ICU stay, and aPTT ratio was more prolonged in the therapeutic group (p < 0.05).

Conclusion: Increasing the anticoagulation of severe COVID-19 patients to a therapeutic level might decrease thrombotic complications without increasing their bleeding risk.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s13613-021-00809-5DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7829649PMC
January 2021

Normal chest CT in 1091 symptomatic patients with confirmed Covid-19: frequency, characteristics and outcome.

Eur Radiol 2021 Jan 13. Epub 2021 Jan 13.

Hôpitaux Universitaires de Strasbourg, Service de Radiologie, Nouvel Hôpital Civil, 1 place de l'Hôpital, 67000, Strasbourg, France.

Objective: Frequency of normal chest CT in symptomatic COVID-19 patients as well as the outcome of these patients remains unknown. The objectives of this work were to assess the incidence of initially normal chest CT in a cohort of consecutive confirmed COVID-19 patients with respiratory symptoms and to compare their clinical characteristics and their outcome to matched patients with typical COVID-19 lesions at initial CT.

Methods: From March 6 to April 22, all consecutive adult patients referred to the COVID-19 clinic of our Emergency Department were retrospectively analyzed. Each patient with a positive SARS-CoV-2 RT-PCR and a normal initial chest CT after second reading was 1:1 matched based on sex, age and date of CT acquisition to a patient with positive RT-PCR and initial chest CT with typical COVID-19 lesions. Clinical data, laboratory results and outcomes (major being mechanical ventilation and/or death) were compared between both groups, using Wilcoxon signed-rank test, McNemar's chi-squared test and/or exact McNemar's test where appropriate.

Results: Fifty-seven chest CT out of 1091 (5.2%, 95% CI 4.0-6.7) in symptomatic patients with positive RT-PCR were normal, with a median onset of symptoms of 4.5 days (IQR [1.25-10.25]). After a median follow-up of 43 days, death and/or mechanical ventilation occurred in 3 patients (5.3%) in the study group, versus 11 (19.3%) in the control group (p = 0.011).

Conclusions: Normal initial chest CT occurred in 5.2% of symptomatic confirmed COVID-19 cases in our cohort. While better than those with abnormal chest CT, outcome was not entirely benign with 5.3% death and/or mechanical ventilation.

Key Points: • In a cohort of 1091 symptomatic COVID-19 patients, initial chest CT was normal in 5.2% of cases. • Normal chest CT in confirmed COVID-19 is frequent even when onset of symptoms is greater than 3 days. • The outcome of COVID-19 patients with initial normal chest CT, while better than those with abnormal CT, was not entirely benign with 5.3% death and/or mechanical ventilation.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00330-020-07593-zDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7804574PMC
January 2021

D-Dimers Level as a Possible Marker of Extravascular Fibrinolysis in COVID-19 Patients.

J Clin Med 2020 Dec 24;10(1). Epub 2020 Dec 24.

Division of Cardiovascular Medicine, Nouvel Hôpital Civil, Strasbourg University Hospital, 67000 Strasbourg, France.

Background And Objective: Host defence mechanisms to counter virus infection include the activation of the broncho-alveolar haemostasis. Fibrin degradation products secondary to extravascular fibrin breakdown could contribute to the marked increase in D-Dimers during COVID-19. We sought to examine the prognostic value on lung injury of D-Dimers in non-critically ill COVID-19 patients without thrombotic events.

Methods: This study retrospectively analysed hospitalized COVID-19 patients classified according to a D-Dimers threshold following the COVID-19 associated haemostatic abnormalities (CAHA) classification at baseline and at peak (Stage 1: D-Dimers less than three-fold above normal; Stage 2: D-Dimers three- to six-fold above normal; Stage 3: D-Dimers six-fold above normal). The primary endpoint was the occurrence of critical lung injuries on chest computed tomography. The secondary outcome was the composite of in-hospital death or transfer to the intensive care unit (ICU).

Results: Among the 123 patients included, critical lung injuries were evidenced in 8 (11.9%) patients in Stage 1, 6 (20%) in Stage 2 and 15 (57.7%) in Stage 3 ( = 0.001). D-Dimers staging at peak was an independent predictor of critical lung injuries regardless of the inflammatory burden assessed by CRP levels (OR 2.70, 95% CI (1.50-4.86); < 0.001) and was significantly associated with increased in-hospital death or ICU transfer (14.9 % in Stage 1, 50.0% in Stage 2 and 57.7% in Stage 3 ( < 0.001)). D-Dimers staging at peak was an independent predictor of in-hospital death or ICU transfer (OR 2.50, CI 95% (1.27-4.93); = 0.008).

Conclusions: In the absence of overt thrombotic events, D-Dimers quantification is a relevant marker of critical lung injuries and dismal patient outcome.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/jcm10010039DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7795726PMC
December 2020

Pulmonary Embolism and Deep Vein Thrombosis in COVID-19: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.

Radiology 2021 02 15;298(2):E70-E80. Epub 2020 Dec 15.

From the Department of Radiology, Research Institute of Radiological Science, Severance Hospital, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul, Korea (Y.J.S.); Medical Research Collaborating Center (H.H.) and Department of Radiology (S.H.Y.), Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul National University College of Medicine, 101 Daehak-ro, Jongno-gu, Seoul 03080, Korea; Department of Radiology, Nouvel Hôpital Civil, Hôpitaux Universitaires de Strasbourg, Strasbourg, France (M.O.); Department of Radiology, Cochin Hospital, Assistance Publique-Hôpitaux de Paris Centre, Paris, France (F.B., M.P.R.); Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Papa Giovanni XXIII, Bergamo, Italy (C.V.); Department of Radiology, Military Hospital Begin, Saint Mande, France (A.G.); Resuscitation Center, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Lille, Université de Lille, Institut National de la Santé et de la Recherche Médicale U1285, Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique Unité Mixte de Recherche 8576-Unité de Glycobiologie Structurale et Fonctionnelle, Lille, France (J.P.); Department of Hematology and Transfusion, Pôle de Biologie Pathologie Génétique, Institut Pasteur de Lille, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Lille, Université de Lille, Institut National de la Santé et de la Recherche Médicale Unité Mixte de Recherche 1011-European Genomic Institute for Diabetes, Lille, France (S.S.); Institute of Cardiometabolism and Nutrition, Sorbonne Université, Institut National de la Santé et de la Recherche Médicale Unité de Recherche sur les Maladies Cardiovasculaires, le Métabolisme et la Nutrition 1166, Paris, France; Intensive Medicine-Resuscitation Department, Institut de Cardiologie, Hôpital Pitié-Salpêtrière, Assistance Publique-Hôpitaux de Paris, Paris, France (G.H.); Department of Internal Medicine, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Nantes, Nantes, France (M.A.); Angiology Unit, Hôpital Fribourgeois-Hôpital Cantonal, Fribourg, Switzerland (D.P.); Multipurpose Resuscitation Service, Centre Hospitalier Victor Dupouy, Argenteuil, France (D.C.); Department of Intensive Care Medicine, Centre Hospitalier du Valais Romand de l'Hôpital du Valais (site de Sion), Sion, Switzerland (J.D., B.S.); and Department of Radiology, King's College Hospital National Health Service Foundation Trust, London, England (C.F., G.G., H.R.).

Background The association of pulmonary embolism (PE) with deep vein thrombosis (DVT) in patients with coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) remains unclear, and the diagnostic accuracy of D-dimer tests for PE is unknown. Purpose To conduct meta-analysis of the study-level incidence of PE and DVT and to evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of D-dimer tests for PE from multicenter individual patient data. Materials and Methods A systematic literature search identified studies evaluating the incidence of PE or DVT in patients with COVID-19 from January 1, 2020, to June 15, 2020. These outcomes were pooled using a random-effects model and were further evaluated using metaregression analysis. The diagnostic accuracy of D-dimer tests for PE was estimated on the basis of individual patient data using the summary receiver operating characteristic curve. Results Twenty-seven studies with 3342 patients with COVID-19 were included in the analysis. The pooled incidence rates of PE and DVT were 16.5% (95% CI: 11.6, 22.9; = 0.93) and 14.8% (95% CI: 8.5, 24.5; = 0.94), respectively. PE was more frequently found in patients who were admitted to the intensive care unit (ICU) (24.7% [95% CI: 18.6, 32.1] vs 10.5% [95% CI: 5.1, 20.2] in those not admitted to the ICU) and in studies with universal screening using CT pulmonary angiography. DVT was present in 42.4% of patients with PE. D-dimer tests had an area under the receiver operating characteristic curve of 0.737 for PE, and D-dimer levels of 500 and 1000 μg/L showed high sensitivity (96% and 91%, respectively) but low specificity (10% and 24%, respectively). Conclusion Pulmonary embolism (PE) and deep vein thrombosis (DVT) occurred in 16.5% and 14.8% of patients with coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), respectively, and more than half of patients with PE lacked DVT. The cutoffs of D-dimer levels used to exclude PE in preexisting guidelines seem applicable to patients with COVID-19. © RSNA, 2020 See also the editorial by Woodard in this issue.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1148/radiol.2020203557DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7745997PMC
February 2021

Temporal variations in the diagnostic performance of chest CT for Covid-19 depending on disease prevalence: Experience from North-Eastern France.

Eur J Radiol 2021 Jan 20;134:109425. Epub 2020 Nov 20.

Hôpitaux Universitaires de Strasbourg, Service de Radiologie, Nouvel Hôpital Civil, Strasbourg, France.

Rationale And Objective: The purpose of this work was to analyze temporal variations in the diagnostic performance of chest CT for Covid-19 throughout the first wave, depending on disease prevalence variations between the ascending, peak and descending phases of the epidemic in North-Eastern France.

Materials And Methods: From March 6th to April 22nd 2020, all consecutive adult patients referred to the "Covid-19 clinic" of our Emergency Department with the availability of chest CT and of at least one RT-PCR result were retrospectively included in the present study. Chest CT was considered positive when typical Covid-19 lesions were observed (bilateral and predominantly peripheral and sub-pleural ground glass opacities and/or alveolar consolidations). RT-PCR results were considered as the reference standard. Ascending, peak and descending phases were determined based on the number of CT scans performed daily. CT diagnostic performance were calculated and variations between phases were tested for equivalence or difference using Bayesian methods.

Results: 2194 consecutive chest CT were analyzed. Overall CT diagnostic performance was Se = 84.2 [82.0 ; 86.3], Sp = 86.6 [84.5 ; 88.5], PPV = 86.1 [84.0 ; 88.1], NPV = 84.7 [82.6 ; 86.7] and accuracy = 85.4 [83.9 ; 86.8], with no significant differences between chest and non-chest radiologists. Variations between the ascending (11 days, 281 chest CT, disease prevalence 37.0 %), the peak (18 days, 1167 chest CT, disease prevalence 64 %) and the descending phases (19 days, 746 chest CT, disease prevalence 32.2 %) were highest for PPV and NPV with a probability of difference >99.9 %, and smallest for accuracy and specificity with a probability of equivalence >98.8 %.

Conclusion: In a homogenous cohort of 2194 consecutive chest CT performed over a 7-week epidemic wave, we observed significant variations of CT predictive values whereas CT specificity appeared marginally affected.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ejrad.2020.109425DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7836755PMC
January 2021

A novel, automated, quantification of abnormal lung parenchyma in patients with COVID-19 infection: Initial description of feasibility and association with clinical outcome.

Anaesth Crit Care Pain Med 2021 Feb 13;40(1):100780. Epub 2020 Nov 13.

Department of Anesthesiology and Intensive Care, Hautepierre Hospital, Strasbourg University Hospital, France; Institut Hospitalo-Universitaire "Image-Guided Surgery", Strasbourg University Hospital, Strasbourg, France; Equipe d'Accueil 3072, Medical School, Strasbourg University, Strasbourg, France.

Objective: Ground-glass opacities are the most frequent radiologic features of COVID-19 patients. We aimed to determine the feasibility of automated lung volume measurements, including ground-glass volumes, on the CT of suspected COVID-19 patients. Our goal was to create an automated and quantitative measure of ground-glass opacities from lung CT images that could be used clinically for diagnosis, triage and research.

Design: Single centre, retrospective, observational study.

Measurements: Demographic data, respiratory support treatment (synthetised in the maximal respiratory severity score) and CT-images were collected. Volume of abnormal lung parenchyma was measured with conventional semi-automatic software and with a novel automated algorithm based on voxels X-Ray attenuation. We looked for the relationship between the automated and semi-automated evaluations. The association between the ground-glass opacities volume and the maximal respiratory severity score was assessed.

Main Results: Thirty-seven patients were included in the main outcome analysis. The mean duration of automated and semi-automated volume measurement process were 15 (2) and 93 (41) min, respectively (p=8.05*10). The intraclass correlation coefficient between the semi-automated and automated measurement of ground-glass opacities and restricted normally aerated lung were both superior to 0.99. The association between the automated measured lung volume and the maximal clinical severity score was statistically significant for the restricted normally aerated (p=0.0097, effect-size: -385mL) volumes and for the ratio of ground-glass opacities/restricted normally aerated volumes (p=0.027, effect-size: 3.3).

Conclusion: The feasibility and preliminary validity of automated impaired lung volume measurements in a high-density COVID-19 cluster was confirmed by our results.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.accpm.2020.10.014DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7664353PMC
February 2021

Co-Registration of Peripheral Atherosclerotic Plaques Assessed by Conventional CT Angiography, MicroCT and Histology in Patients with Chronic Limb Threatening Ischaemia.

Eur J Vasc Endovasc Surg 2021 Jan 10;61(1):146-154. Epub 2020 Nov 10.

CVPath Institute, Gaithersburg, MD, USA. Electronic address:

Objective: To co-register conventional computed tomography angiography (CTA), with ex vivo micro-computed tomography (microCT) and histology of popliteal atherosclerotic plaques. Improving the non-invasive imaging capabilities may be valuable to advance patient care with peripheral arterial obstructive disease towards lesion and individual based treatment.

Methods: In this prospective observational study, 12 popliteal arteries from 11 symptomatic patients who had undergone transfemoral amputations for chronic limb threatening ischaemia and who had pre-operative CTA, were analysed ex vivo by microCT and histology. A total of 353 histological cross sections were co-registered with microCT and CTA, and classified as: lipid rich (LP, n = 26), fibrous (FP, n = 80), or calcific (CP, n = 247) plaques. CTA and microCT plaque density was calculated in 791 regions of interest as Hounsfield units (HU).

Results: CTA and microCT could identify plaque components that were confirmed by histology such as fibrous tissue (FP), lipid pool/core (LP), and calcification (CP). MicroCT densities were 77.8 HU for FP (IQR 52.8, 129.5 HU), -28.4 HU for LP (IQR -87.1, 13.2 HU), and 3826.0 HU for CP (IQR 2989.0, 4501.0 HU). CTA densities of the three components of the plaque were: 78.0 HU for FP (IQR 59.5, 119.8 HU), 32.5 HU for LP (IQR 15.0, 42 HU), and 641.5 HU for CP (IQR 425.8, 1135 HU). The differences were statistically significant between the HU densitometric characteristics among the three groups (p < .0001) for both imaging modalities. Overall, microCT performed better diagnostically than conventional CTA for the three types of plaques: areas under the receiving operator characteristics curve were greater for microCT than CTA for FP (0.97 vs. 0.90), for LP (0.88 vs. 0.67), and for CP (0.97 vs. 0.90).

Conclusion: CTA and microCT can be used to identify histological atherosclerotic plaque components, with better diagnostic performance for microCT. This study demonstrates the feasibility of using microCT to assess plaque morphology lesions in a manner that approaches histology thus becoming a useful tool for ex vivo assessment of atherosclerosis and towards lesion based treatment.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ejvs.2020.08.037DOI Listing
January 2021

Biomarkers of Cytokine Release Syndrome Predict Disease Severity and Mortality From COVID-19 in Kidney Transplant Recipients.

Transplantation 2021 01;105(1):158-169

Department of Nephrology and Transplantation, University Hospital, Strasbourg, France.

Background: Data on coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) in immunocompromised kidney transplant recipients (KTR) remain scanty. Although markers of inflammation, cardiac injury, and coagulopathy have been previously associated with mortality in the general population of patients with COVID-19, their prognostic impact amongst KTR with severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus-2 (SARS-CoV-2) infection has not been specifically investigated.

Methods: We conducted a cohort study of 49 KTR who presented with COVID-19. Clinical and laboratory risk factors for severe disease and mortality were prospectively collected and analyzed with respect to outcomes. The study participants were divided into 3 groups: (1) mild disease manageable in an outpatient setting (n = 8), (2) nonsevere disease requiring hospitalization (n = 21), and (3) severe disease (n = 20).

Results: Gastrointestinal manifestations were common at diagnosis. The 30-day mortality rate in hospitalized patients was 19.5%. Early elevations of C-reactive protein (>100 mg/L) and interleukin-6 (>65 ng/L) followed by increases in high-sensitivity troponin I (>30 ng/L) and D-dimer (>960 ng/mL) were significantly associated with severe disease and mortality. Viral load did not have prognostic significance in our sample, suggesting that outcomes were chiefly driven by a cytokine release syndrome (CRS).

Conclusions: Regular monitoring of CRS biomarkers in KTR with COVID-19 is paramount to improve clinical outcomes.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/TP.0000000000003480DOI Listing
January 2021

Patients with Initial Negative RT-PCR and Typical Imaging of COVID-19: Clinical Implications.

J Clin Med 2020 Sep 18;9(9). Epub 2020 Sep 18.

Emergency Department, Hôpitaux Universitaires de Strasbourg, 67000 Strasbourg, France.

The sensitivity of reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) has been questioned due to negative results in some patients who were strongly suspected of having coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). The aim of our study was to analyze the prognosis of infected patients with initial negative RT-PCR in the emergency department (ED) during the COVID-19 outbreak. This study included two cohorts of adult inpatients admitted into the ED. All patients who were suspected to be infected with SARS-CoV-2 and who underwent a typical chest CT imaging were included. Thus, we studied two distinct cohorts: patients with positive RT-PCR (PCR+) and those with negative initial RT-PCR (PCR-). The data were analyzed using Bayesian methods. We included 66 patients in the PCR- group and 198 in the PCR+ group. The baseline characteristics did not differ except in terms of a proportion of lower chronic respiratory disease in the PCR- group. We noted a less severe clinical presentation in the PCR- group (lower respiratory rate, lower oxygen need and mechanical ventilation requirement). Hospital mortality (9.1% vs. 9.6%) did not differ between the two groups. Despite an initially less serious clinical presentation, the mortality of patients infected by SARS-CoV-2 with a negative RT-PCR did not differ from those with positive RT-PCR.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/jcm9093014DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7564057PMC
September 2020

Periprocedural Predictors of New-Onset Conduction Abnormalities After Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement.

Circ J 2020 09 1;84(10):1875-1883. Epub 2020 Sep 1.

Université de Strasbourg, Pôle d'Activité Médico-Chirurgicale Cardio-Vasculaire, Nouvel Hôpital Civil, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire.

Background: New-onset conduction abnormalities (CAs) following transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) are associated with hospital rehospitalization and long-term mortality, but available predictors are sparse. This study sought to determine clinical predictors of new-onset left bundle branch block (LBBB) and new permanent pacemaker (PPM) implantation in patients undergoing TAVR.Methods and Results:We enrolled 290 patients who received SAPIEN 3 (Edwards Lifesciences, Irvine, CA, USA; n=217) or Evolut R (Medtronic, Minneapolis, MN, USA; n=73) from a prospective registry at Nouvel Hôpital Civil, Strasbourg, France between September 2014 and February 2018. Of 242 patients without pre-existing LBBB, 114 (47%) experienced new-onset LBBB and/or new PPM implantation. A difference between membranous septal length and implantation depth (∆MSID) was the only predictor of CAs for both types of valves. In the multivariate analysis, PR interval and ∆MSID remained as sole predictors of CAs. The risk for adverse clinical events, including all-cause death, myocardial infarction, stroke, and heart failure hospitalization, was higher for patients with CAs as compared with patients without CAs (hazard ratio: 2.10; 95% confidence interval: 1.26 to 3.57; P=0.004).

Conclusions: Computed tomography assessment of membranous septal anatomy and implantation depth predicted CAs after TAVR with new-generation valves. Future studies are required to identify whether adjustment of the implantation depth can reduce the risk of CAs and adverse clinical outcomes.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1253/circj.CJ-20-0257DOI Listing
September 2020

Efficacy of Chest CT for COVID-19 Pneumonia Diagnosis in France.

Radiology 2021 02 1;298(2):E81-E87. Epub 2020 Sep 1.

From the University Hospital Centre Poitiers, Radiology, 2 rue de la Milétrie, 86000 Poitiers, Vienne, France (G. Herpe.); Laboratoire de Mathématiques et Applications Université de Poitiers, DACTIM-MIS TEAM, Chasseneuil, Nouvelle Aquitaine, France (G. Herpe.); University Hospital of Rennes, Radiology, Rennes, Ille-et-Vilaine, France (M. Lederlin.); University of Rennes, Rennes, Ille-et-Vilaine, France (M. Lederlin.); Université de Poitiers Laboratoire de Mathématiques et Applications, DACTIM-MIS, Chasseneuil, Nouvelle Aquitaine, France (M.N.); University Hospital Centre Poitiers, DACTIM-MIS, Poitiers, France (M.N.); Nouvel Hôpital Civil, Radiology, Strasbourg, Alsace, France (M.O.); APHM, Radiology, Marseille, PACA, France (K.C.); AMU, Marseille, PACA, France (K.C.); Beaujon Hospital Department of Medical Imaging, Radiology, Clichy, France (J.G.); Beaujon University Hospitals Paris Nord Val de Seine, Radiology, Clichy, Hauts-de-Seine, France (V.V.); CHU Nîmes, Nîmes, Gard, France (C.A.F.); Hôpital Saint-Louis, Radiology, Paris, Île-de-France, France (C.D.M.M.); Université de Paris, INSERM U1149-Center for Research on Inflammation, Paris, Île-de-France, France (C.D.M.M.); Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Nice Hôpital Pasteur, Radiology, Nice, Alpes Maritimes, France (V.F.); Centre Hospitalier Annecy Genevois, Radiology, Epagny Metz-Tessy, Auvergne-Rhône-Alpes, France (M. Ludwig.); CHU Nice, Radiology, Nice, PACA, France (L.M.); European Hospital Group Georges-Pompidou, Radiology, Paris, Île-de-France, France (I.F.); Université de la Méditérranée, Faculté de Médecine de Marseille, Centre de Résonance Magnétique Biologique et Médicale (CRMBM), UMR CNRS no. 6612, Marseille, BdR, France (A.R.R.J.); Centre Hospitalo Universitaire la Timone, Service de Radiologie Cardiovasculaire, Marseille, France (A.R.R.J.); Centre Hospitalier de la Côte Basque, Bayonne, Nouvelle Aquitaine, France (P.A.); CHRU de Nancy, Radiology, Nancy, Grand Est, France (I.P.); HIA Legouest, Service d'Imagerie Médicale, Metz, France (A.G.); CHU Nancy, Service D'imagerie Guilloz, Nancy, France (A.G.); Hôpital Saint-Joseph, Radiology, Marseille, PACA, France (O.B.); Clinique Emilie de Vialar, IMEV, Radiologie, Rhône, France (A.C.); CH Douai, NORD, Loffre, France (M.M.S.); University Hospital Centre Poitiers, Poitiers, Vienne, France (C.T.); CHRDS, Neuilly-sur-Seine, Neuilly-sur-Seine, France (G. Henry.);, Île de France, France (V.B.); Hôpital d'Instruction des Armées Begin, Radiology, Saint Mande, Île-de-France, France (T.L.T.); Hôpital d'Instruction des Armées Percy, Radiology, Clamart, Île-de-France, France (T.L.T.); CHU Limoges, Radiology, Limoges, Nouvelle Aquitaine, France (M.S.G.); CHU Dupuytren, Radiologie, Limoges, Haute-Vienne, France (P.G.); Military Teaching Hospital Clermont-Tonnerre, Radiology, Brest, Bretagne, France (M.G.); Hôpital Argenteuil, Argenteuil, Île-de-France, France (E.B.); Centre Hospitalier Pierre-le-Damany Lannion Trestel, Kergomar, Lannion, Bretagne, France (C.M.); Institut Bergonie, Bordeaux, Nouvelle Aquitaine, France (B.L.); CH Douai, Radiology, Douai, Nord, France (A.K.); Centre Hospitalier de Vienne Lucien Hussel, Medical Imaging, Vienne, Aura, France (H.K.); Hôpital d'Instruction des Armées Laveran, Radiology, Marseille, Bouches-du-Rhône, France (F.D.); CHU Tivoli, La Louvière, Wallonie, Belgium (B.D.); CHU Poitiers, Clinical Investigation Center CIC1402, Poitiers, Vienne, France (P.J.S.); CHU Poitiers, Radiology, Poitiers, Poitou-Charentes, France (R.G.); La Timone Hospital, Radiology, Marseille, BdR, France (J.M.B.); University Hospital Center of Nîmes, Radiology, Nîmes, Gard, France (J.P.B.); Université de Poitiers, Faculté de Médecine et de Pharmacie, Poitiers, France, France (J.P.T.); and CHU de Poitiers, Service de Radiologie, Poitiers, France, France (J.P.T.) .

Background The role and performance of chest CT in the diagnosis of the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic remains under active investigation. Purpose To evaluate the French national experience using chest CT for COVID-19, results of chest CT and reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) assays were compared together and with the final discharge diagnosis used as the reference standard. Materials and Methods A structured CT scan survey (NCT04339686) was sent to 26 hospital radiology departments in France between March 2, 2020, and April 24, 2020. These dates correspond to the peak of the national COVID-19 epidemic. Radiology departments were selected to reflect the estimated geographic prevalence heterogeneities of the epidemic. All symptomatic patients suspected of having COVID-19 pneumonia who underwent both initial chest CT and at least one RT-PCR test within 48 hours were included. The final discharge diagnosis, based on multiparametric items, was recorded. Data for each center were prospectively collected and gathered each week. Test efficacy was determined by using the Mann-Whitney test, Student test, χ test, and Pearson correlation coefficient. < .05 indicated a significant difference. Results Twenty-six of 26 hospital radiology departments responded to the survey, with 7500 patients entered; 2652 did not have RT-PCR test results or had unknown or excess delay between the RT-PCR test and CT. After exclusions, 4824 patients (mean age, 64 years ± 19 [standard deviation], 2669 male) were included. With final diagnosis as the reference, 2564 of the 4824 patients had COVID-19 (53%). Sensitivity, specificity, negative predictive value, and positive predictive value of chest CT in the diagnosis of COVID-19 were 2319 of 2564 (90%; 95% CI: 89, 91), 2056 of 2260 (91%; 95% CI: 91, 92), 2056 of 2300 (89%; 95% CI: 87, 90), and 2319 of 2524 (92%; 95% CI: 91, 93), respectively. There was no significant difference for chest CT efficacy among the 26 geographically separate sites, each with varying amounts of disease prevalence. Conclusion Use of chest CT for the initial diagnosis and triage of patients suspected of having coronavirus disease 2019 was successful. © RSNA, 2021
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1148/radiol.2020202568DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7465292PMC
February 2021

Staging Severity of COVID-19 according to Hemostatic Abnormalities (CAHA Score).

Thromb Haemost 2020 Dec 30;120(12):1716-1719. Epub 2020 Aug 30.

Division of Cardiovascular Medicine, Nouvel Hôpital Civil, Strasbourg University Hospital, Strasbourg, France.

This is the first study to show a stepwise increase in venous thrombotic events according to COVID-19 coagulopathy (COVID-19-associated hemostatic abnormalities [CAHA]) staging and lung injuries assessed by chest computed tomography. Excess mortality and/or transfer to intensive care unit according to CAHA staging.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1055/s-0040-1715836DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7869051PMC
December 2020

Acute adrenal infarction as an incidental CT finding and a potential prognosis factor in severe SARS-CoV-2 infection: a retrospective cohort analysis on 219 patients.

Eur Radiol 2021 Feb 27;31(2):895-900. Epub 2020 Aug 27.

Service de Radiologie B, Nouvel Hôpital Civil, Hôpitaux Universitaires de Strasbourg, 1, place de l'hôpital, BP 426, 67091, Strasbourg Cedex, France.

Objectives: To retrospectively investigate the incidence of acute adrenal infarction (AAI) in patients who underwent chest CT for severe SARS-CoV-2 infection and to correlate findings with prognosis.

Methods: The local ethics committee approved this retrospective study and waived the need of informed consent. From March 9 to April 10, 2020, all patients referred to our institution for a clinical suspicion of COVID-19 with moderate to severe symptoms underwent a chest CT for triage. Patients with a/parenchymal lesion characteristics of COVID-19 involving at least 50% of lung parenchyma and b/positive RT-PCR for SARS-CoV-2 were retrospectively included. Adrenal glands were reviewed by two independent readers to look for AAI. Additional demographics and potential biological markers of adrenal insufficiency were obtained. Correlations with ICU stay and mortality were sought.

Results: Out of the 219 patients with critical (n = 52) and severe lung (n = 167) parenchyma lesions, 51 (23%) had CT scan signs of AAI, which was bilateral in 45 patients (88%). Four patients had an acute biological adrenal gland insufficiency (8%). Univariate analysis in AAI+ patients demonstrated a higher rate of ICU stay (67% vs. 45%, p < 0.05) and a longer stay (more than 15 days for 31% for AAI+ vs. 19%, p < 0.05) compared with AAI- patients. Mortality rate was similar (27%, p = 0.92).

Conclusions: Acute adrenal infarction on initial chest evaluation of severe COVID-19 is frequent (51/219, 23%) and might be a sign of poorer prognosis.

Key Points: • Acute adrenal infarction on initial chest CT evaluation of severe COVID-19 is frequent (51/219). • AAI might be a factor of poorer prognosis, with increased rate of ICU hospitalization and length of stay.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00330-020-07226-5DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7450155PMC
February 2021

Delirium and encephalopathy in severe COVID-19: a cohort analysis of ICU patients.

Crit Care 2020 08 8;24(1):491. Epub 2020 Aug 8.

Hôpitaux Universitaires de Strasbourg, Service de Médecine Intensive-Réanimation, Nouvel Hôpital Civil, 1, place de l'Hôpital, F-67091, Strasbourg, Cedex, France.

Background: Neurotropism of SARS-CoV-2 and its neurological manifestations have now been confirmed. We aimed at describing delirium and neurological symptoms of COVID-19 in ICU patients.

Methods: We conducted a bicentric cohort study in two French ICUs of Strasbourg University Hospital. All the 150 patients referred for acute respiratory distress syndrome due to SARS-CoV-2 between March 3 and May 5, 2020, were included at their admission. Ten patients (6.7%) were excluded because they remained under neuromuscular blockers during their entire ICU stay. Neurological examination, including CAM-ICU, and cerebrospinal fluid analysis, electroencephalography, and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) were performed in some of the patients with delirium and/or abnormal neurological examination. The primary endpoint was to describe the incidence of delirium and/or abnormal neurological examination. The secondary endpoints were to describe the characteristics of delirium, to compare the duration of invasive mechanical ventilation and ICU length of stay in patients with and without delirium and/or abnormal neurological symptoms.

Results: The 140 patients were aged in median of 62 [IQR 52; 70] years old, with a median SAPSII of 49 [IQR 37; 64] points. Neurological examination was normal in 22 patients (15.7%). One hundred eighteen patients (84.3%) developed a delirium with a combination of acute attention, awareness, and cognition disturbances. Eighty-eight patients (69.3%) presented an unexpected state of agitation despite high infusion rates of sedative treatments and neuroleptics, and 89 (63.6%) patients had corticospinal tract signs. Brain MRI performed in 28 patients demonstrated enhancement of subarachnoid spaces in 17/28 patients (60.7%), intraparenchymal, predominantly white matter abnormalities in 8 patients, and perfusion abnormalities in 17/26 patients (65.4%). The 42 electroencephalograms mostly revealed unspecific abnormalities or diffuse, especially bifrontal, slow activity. Cerebrospinal fluid examination revealed inflammatory disturbances in 18/28 patients, including oligoclonal bands with mirror pattern and elevated IL-6. The CSF RT-PCR SARS-CoV-2 was positive in one patient. The delirium/neurological symptoms in COVID-19 patients were responsible for longer mechanical ventilation compared to the patients without delirium/neurological symptoms. Delirium/neurological symptoms could be secondary to systemic inflammatory reaction to SARS-CoV-2.

Conclusions And Relevance: Delirium/neurological symptoms in COVID-19 patients are a major issue in ICUs, especially in the context of insufficient human and material resources.

Trial Registration: NA.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s13054-020-03200-1DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7414289PMC
August 2020

Paradoxical Increase of Stroke in Patients with Defect of High Molecular Weight Multimers of the von Willebrand Factors following Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement.

Thromb Haemost 2020 Sep 29;120(9):1330-1338. Epub 2020 Jul 29.

Pôle d'Activité Médico-Chirurgicale Cardio-Vasculaire, Nouvel Hôpital Civil, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire, Université de Strasbourg, Strasbourg, France.

Background:  Stroke is a major cause of disability after transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) and stroke prediction models and data are crucially needed. Following TAVR, high molecular weight (HMW) multimers defect of von Willebrand factor (VWF) as assessed by closure time of adenosine diphosphate (CT-ADP) value > 180 seconds is an independent predictor of bleeding events. This study sought to identify predictors of ischemic neurological events in patients who underwent TAVR and the specific impact of HMW multimers defect of VWF.

Methods:  Patients were prospectively enrolled between November 2012 and May 2018 at our institution. The CT-ADP, a point-of-care measure of hemostasis, was assessed the day before and 24 hours after the procedures. The rate of ischemic stroke and transient ischemic attack (TIA) was recorded up to 30 days after the procedures.

Results:  Of 565 TAVR patients, ischemic stroke/TIA was observed in 21 (3.7%) patients within 30 days. Ischemic stroke/TIA was associated with major/life-threatening bleeding complications (MLBCs) (9 [43%] vs. 88 [16%],  = 0.002) and postprocedure CT-ADP > 180 seconds (10 [48%] vs. 116 [21%],  = 0.01). By multivariate analysis, MLBCs (odds ratio [OR]: 3.58; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.45-8.84;  = 0.006) and postprocedure CT-ADP > 180 seconds (OR: 3.38; 95% CI: 1.38-8.25;  = 0.008) were evidenced as independent predictors of ischemic stroke/TIA.

Conclusion:  MLBCs and CT-ADP > 180 seconds were identified as predictors for ischemic stroke or TIA. The present study suggests that the defects of HMW multimers of the VWFs may contribute not only to bleeding events but also to thrombotic events.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1055/s-0040-1713424DOI Listing
September 2020

CT lung lesions as predictors of early death or ICU admission in COVID-19 patients.

Clin Microbiol Infect 2020 Oct 24;26(10):1417.e5-1417.e8. Epub 2020 Jul 24.

Department of Infectious Disease, Strasbourg University Hospital, Strasbourg, France.

Objective: The main objective of this study was to investigate the prognostic value of early systematic chest computed tomography (CT) with quantification of lung lesions in coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) patients.

Methods: We studied 572 patients diagnosed with COVID-19 (confirmed using polymerase chain reaction) for whom a chest CT was performed at hospital admission. Visual quantification was used to classify patients as per the percentage of lung parenchyma affected by COVID-19 lesions: normal CT, 0-10%, 11-25%, 26-50%, 51-75% and >75%. The primary endpoint was severe disease, defined by death or admission to the intensive care unit in the 7 days following first admission.

Results: The mean patient age was 66.0 ± 16.0 years, and 343/572 (60.0%) were men. The primary endpoint occurred in 206/572 patients (36.0%). The extent of lesions on initial CT was independently associated with prognosis (odds ratio = 2.35, 95% confidence interval 1.24-4.46; p < 0.01). Most patients with lung involvement >50% (66/95, 69.5%) developed severe disease compared to patients with lung involvement of 26-50% (70/171, 40.9%) and ≤25% (70/306, 22.9%) (p < 0.01 and p < 0.01, respectively). None of the patients with normal CT (0/14) had severe disease.

Conclusion: Chest CT findings at admission are associated with outcome in COVID-19 patients.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.cmi.2020.07.030DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7378475PMC
October 2020

Bilateral Acute Cardioembolic Limb Ischemia After Coronavirus Disease 2019 Pneumonia in a Lung Transplant Recipient: A Case Report.

Transplant Proc 2020 Nov 30;52(9):2715-2718. Epub 2020 Jun 30.

Pneumology Unit, Strasbourg Lung Transplant Program, Hôpitaux Universitaires de Strasbourg, Strasbourg, France.

Very few cases of lung transplant patients affected by coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) have been reported to date. A 31-year-old patient who underwent bilateral lung transplantation for cystic fibrosis in 2012 was admitted for severe acute lower limb pain. He had a confirmed exposure to COVID-19 and a 3-week history of upper respiratory tract infection. Whole-body computed tomography (CT) angiography revealed an occlusion of the 2 common femoral arteries. CT angiography detected an intracardiac thrombus in the left ventricle. Chest CT angiography showed ground-glass opacities consistent with COVID-19. A bilateral femoral surgical embolectomy using Fogarty catheter was successfully performed. Specific reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction for severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 performed on an extracted thrombus was negative, but IgM antibodies specific for COVID-19 were detected. Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated a subendocardial and almost transmural late gadolinium enhancement in the mid and distal inferolateral and inferior wall segments, consistent with a nonrecent myocardial infarction and an apical centimetric thrombus adjacent to the lesion. Thrombophilia laboratory tests found the presence of a positive lupus anticoagulant. Treatment with low-molecular-weight heparin and aspirin was prescribed. On day 13, the patient was discharged from the hospital. This case underlines the need to be vigilant with respect to the thrombotic complications of COVID-19 and raises the issue of thrombosis prevention in COVID-19 patients.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.transproceed.2020.06.024DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7324323PMC
November 2020

Venous thromboembolism in non-critically ill patients with COVID-19 infection.

Thromb Res 2020 09 17;193:166-169. Epub 2020 Jul 17.

Division of Cardiovascular Medicine, Nouvel Hôpital Civil, Strasbourg University Hospital, Strasbourg, France; INSERM (French National Institute of Health and Medical Research), UMR 1260, Regenerative Nanomedicine, FMTS, Strasbourg, France. Electronic address:

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.thromres.2020.07.033DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7367026PMC
September 2020

Neurologic and neuroimaging findings in patients with COVID-19: A retrospective multicenter study.

Neurology 2020 09 17;95(13):e1868-e1882. Epub 2020 Jul 17.

From the Hôpitaux Universitaires de Strasbourg (S.K., F.L., S.B., F.-D.A., T.W.), Service d'imagerie 2, Hôpital de Hautepierre; Engineering Science, Computer Science and Imaging Laboratory (S.K., N.M.), UMR 7357, University of Strasbourg-CNRS; Service de Neurologie (M. Anheim), Hôpitaux Universitaires de Strasbourg; Institut de Génétique et de Biologie Moléculaire et Cellulaire (M. Anheim), INSERM-U964/CNRS-UMR7104/Université de Strasbourg, Illkirch; Fédération de Médecine Translationnelle de Strasbourg (M. Anheim), Université de Strasbourg; Hôpitaux universitaires de Strasbourg (H.M., F.M., J.H.), Service de Médecine Intensive Réanimation, Nouvel Hôpital Civil; INSERM (French National Institute of Health and Medical Research) (H.M., F.M.), UMR 1260, Regenerative Nanomedicine, Fédération de Médecine Translationnelle de Strasbourg; Médecine Intensive-Réanimation (M.S., F.S.), Hôpital de Hautepierre, Hôpitaux Universitaires de Strasbourg; Service de Neuroradiologie (H.O., F.B., J.M.), Hôpitaux Civils de Colmar; Service d'Imagerie (A. Khalil, A.G.), Unité de Neuroradiologie, Assistance Publique-Hôpitaux de Paris, Hôpital Bichat Claude Bernard; Université Paris Diderot (A. Khalil), Paris; Service de Neurologie (S. Carré, C.L.), Centre Hospitalier de Haguenau; Service de Radiologie (M. Alleg), Centre Hospitalier de Haguenau; Service de Neuroradiologie, (E.S., R.A., F.Z.) Hôpital Central, CHU de Nancy; CHIC Unisanté (L.J., P.N., Y.T.M.), Hôpital Marie Madeleine, Forbach; Neuroimaging Department (G.H., J. Benzakoun, C.O., G. Boulouis, M.E.-G., B.K.), GHU Paris Psychiatrie et Neurosciences, Hôpital Sainte-Anne, Université de Paris, INSERM U1266, F-75014; CHU Rennes (J.-C.F., B.C.-N.), Department of Neuroradiology; CHU Rennes (A.M.), Medical Intensive Care Unit; Department of Neuroradiology (P.-O.C., F.R., P.T.), University Hospital of Dijon, Hôpital François Mitterrand; Service de Radiologie (C.B.), CHU de Saint-Etienne; Service de Réanimation (X.F.), CH de Roanne; Service de Neuroradiologie (G.F., S.S.), CHU de Limoges; Radiology Department (I.d.B., G. Bornet), Hôpital Privé d'Antony; Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Neuroradiology (H.D.), University Hospital, Nantes; Neuroradiology Department (J. Berge), CHU de Bordeaux; Service de Neuroradiologie (A. Kazémi), CHU de Lille; Assistance Publique Hôpitaux de Paris (N.P.), Service de Neuroradiologie, Hôpital Pitié-Salpêtrière; Sorbonne Université (N.P.), Univ Paris 06, UMR S 1127, CNRS UMR 7225, ICM, F-75013; Service de Neuroradiologie Diagnostique (A.L.), Foundation A. Rothschild Hospital, Paris; EA CHIMERE 7516 (J.-M.C.), Université de Picardie Jules Verne; Service de NeuroRadiologie, pôle Imagerie Médicale, Centre Hospitalo-Universitaire d'Amiens; Hôpitaux Universitaires de Strasbourg (P.-E.Z., M.M.), UCIEC, Pôle d'Imagerie, Strasbourg; Observatoire Français de la Sclérose en Plaques (J.-C.B.), Lyon; Nephrology and Transplantation Department (S. Caillard), Hôpitaux Universitaires de Strasbourg; Inserm UMR S1109 (S. Caillard), LabEx Transplantex, Fédération de Médecine Translationnelle de Strasbourg, Université de Strasbourg; Hôpitaux Universitaires de Strasbourg (O.C., P.M.M.), Service d'Anesthésie-Réanimation, Nouvel Hôpital Civil; Hôpitaux Universitaires de Strasbourg (S.F.-K.), Laboratoire de Virologie Médicale; Radiology Department (M.O.), Nouvel Hôpital Civil, Strasbourg University Hospital; CHU de Strasbourg (N.M.), Service de Santé Publique, GMRC, F-67091 Strasbourg; Immuno-Rhumatologie Moléculaire (S.F.-K., J.H.), INSERM UMR_S1109, LabEx TRANSPLANTEX, Centre de Recherche d'Immunologie et d'Hématologie, Faculté de Médecine, Fédération Hospitalo-Universitaire OMICARE, Fédération de Médecine Translationnelle de Strasbourg, Université de Strasbourg; MRI Center (F.C.), Centre Hospitalier Lyon Sud, Hospices Civils de Lyon; and Université Lyon 1 (F.C.), CREATIS-LRMN, CNRS/UMR/5220-INSERM U630, Villeurbanne, France.

Objective: To describe neuroimaging findings and to report the epidemiologic and clinical characteristics of patients with coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) with neurologic manifestations.

Methods: In this retrospective multicenter study (11 hospitals), we included 64 patients with confirmed COVID-19 with neurologic manifestations who underwent a brain MRI.

Results: The cohort included 43 men (67%) and 21 women (33%); their median age was 66 (range 20-92) years. Thirty-six (56%) brain MRIs were considered abnormal, possibly related to severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus. Ischemic strokes (27%), leptomeningeal enhancement (17%), and encephalitis (13%) were the most frequent neuroimaging findings. Confusion (53%) was the most common neurologic manifestation, followed by impaired consciousness (39%), presence of clinical signs of corticospinal tract involvement (31%), agitation (31%), and headache (16%). The profile of patients experiencing ischemic stroke was different from that of other patients with abnormal brain imaging: the former less frequently had acute respiratory distress syndrome ( = 0.006) and more frequently had corticospinal tract signs ( = 0.02). Patients with encephalitis were younger ( = 0.007), whereas agitation was more frequent for patients with leptomeningeal enhancement ( = 0.009).

Conclusions: Patients with COVID-19 may develop a wide range of neurologic symptoms, which can be associated with severe and fatal complications such as ischemic stroke or encephalitis. In terms of meningoencephalitis involvement, even if a direct effect of the virus cannot be excluded, the pathophysiology seems to involve an immune or inflammatory process given the presence of signs of inflammation in both CSF and neuroimaging but the lack of virus in CSF.

Clinicaltrialsgov Identifier: NCT04368390.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1212/WNL.0000000000010112DOI Listing
September 2020

Coronavirus Disease 2019: Associated Multiple Organ Damage.

Open Forum Infect Dis 2020 Jul 21;7(7):ofaa249. Epub 2020 Jun 21.

Service d'Anesthésie-Réanimation, Nouvel Hôpital Civil, Hôpitaux Universitaires de Strasbourg, Strasbourg, France.

A 56-year-old man presented a particularly severe and multisystemic case of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). In addition to the common lung and quite common pulmonary embolism and kidney injuries, he presented ocular and intestinal injuries that, to our knowledge, have not been described in COVID-19 patients. Although it is difficult to make pathophysiological hypotheses about a single case, the multiplicity of injured organs argues for a systemic response to pulmonary infection. A better understanding of physiopathology should feed the discussion about therapeutic options in this type of multifocal damage related to severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/ofid/ofaa249DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7336548PMC
July 2020

Similarities between COVID-19 and anti-MDA5 syndrome: what can we learn for better care?

Eur Respir J 2020 09 24;56(3). Epub 2020 Sep 24.

Physiology and Functional Explorations Dept, University Hospitals of Strasbourg, Strasbourg, France

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1183/13993003.01618-2020DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7338399PMC
September 2020

COVID-19 impact assessment on the French radiological centers: a nationwide survey.

Eur Radiol 2020 Dec 3;30(12):6537-6544. Epub 2020 Jul 3.

University Hospital Center of Nîmes, Radiology, Nîmes, Gard, France.

Purpose: To determine the impact of the COVID-19 on the CT activities in French radiological centers during the epidemic peak.

Materials And Methods: A cross-sectional prospective CT scan survey was conducted between March 16 and April 12, 2020, in accordance with the local IRB. Seven hundred nine radiology centers were invited to participate in a weekly online survey. Numbers of CT examinations related to COVID-19 including at least chest (CT) and whole chest CT scan activities (CT) were recorded each week. A sub-analysis on French departments was performed during the 4 weeks of the study. The impact of the number of RT-PCRs (reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reactions) on the CT workflow was tested using two-sample t test and Pearson's test.

Results: Five hundred seventy-seven structures finally registered (78%) with mean response numbers of 336 ± 18.9 (323; 351). Mean CT activity per radiologic structure ranged from 75.8 ± 133 (0-1444) on week 12 to 99.3 ± 138.6 (0-1147) on week 13. Mean ratio of CT on CT varied from 0.36 to 0.59 on week 12 and week 14 respectively. There was a significant relationship between the number of RT-PCR performed and the number of CT (r = 0.73, p = 3.10) but no link with the number of positive RT-PCR results.

Conclusion: In case of local high density COVID-19, CT workflow is strongly modified and redirected to the management of these specific patients.

Key Points: • Over the 4-week survey period, 117,686 chest CT (CT) were performed among the responding centers, including 61,784 (52%) CT performed for COVID-19 (CT). • Across the country, the ratio CT/CT varied from 0.36 to 0.59 and depended significantly on the local epidemic density (p = 0.003). • In clinical practice, in a context of growing epidemic, in France, chest CT was used as a surrogate to RT-PCR for patient triage.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00330-020-07035-wDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7333367PMC
December 2020

Brain MRI Findings in Severe COVID-19: A Retrospective Observational Study.

Radiology 2020 11 16;297(2):E242-E251. Epub 2020 Jun 16.

From the Hôpitaux Universitaires de Strasbourg, Service d'Imagerie 2, Hôpital de Hautepierre, Strasbourg, France (S.K.).

Background Brain MRI parenchymal signal abnormalities have been associated with severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2). Purpose To describe the neuroimaging findings (excluding ischemic infarcts) in patients with severe coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) infection. Materials and Methods This was a retrospective study of patients evaluated from March 23, 2020, to April 27, 2020, at 16 hospitals. Inclusion criteria were () positive nasopharyngeal or lower respiratory tract reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction assays, () severe COVID-19 infection defined as a requirement for hospitalization and oxygen therapy, () neurologic manifestations, and () abnormal brain MRI findings. Exclusion criteria were patients with missing or noncontributory data regarding brain MRI or brain MRI showing ischemic infarcts, cerebral venous thrombosis, or chronic lesions unrelated to the current event. Categorical data were compared using the Fisher exact test. Quantitative data were compared using the Student test or Wilcoxon test. < .05 represented a significant difference. Results Thirty men (81%) and seven women (19%) met the inclusion criteria, with a mean age of 61 years ± 12 (standard deviation) (age range, 8-78 years). The most common neurologic manifestations were alteration of consciousness (27 of 37, 73%), abnormal wakefulness when sedation was stopped (15 of 37, 41%), confusion (12 of 37, 32%), and agitation (seven of 37, 19%). The most frequent MRI findings were signal abnormalities located in the medial temporal lobe in 16 of 37 patients (43%; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 27%, 59%), nonconfluent multifocal white matter hyperintense lesions seen with fluid-attenuated inversion recovery and diffusion-weighted sequences with variable enhancement, with associated hemorrhagic lesions in 11 of 37 patients (30%; 95% CI: 15%, 45%), and extensive and isolated white matter microhemorrhages in nine of 37 patients (24%; 95% CI: 10%, 38%). A majority of patients (20 of 37, 54%) had intracerebral hemorrhagic lesions with a more severe clinical presentation and a higher admission rate in intensive care units (20 of 20 patients [100%] vs 12 of 17 patients without hemorrhage [71%], = .01) and development of the acute respiratory distress syndrome (20 of 20 patients [100%] vs 11 of 17 patients [65%], = .005). Only one patient had SARS-CoV-2 RNA in the cerebrospinal fluid. Conclusion Patients with severe coronavirus disease 2019 and without ischemic infarcts had a wide range of neurologic manifestations that were associated with abnormal brain MRI scans. Eight distinctive neuroradiologic patterns were described. © RSNA, 2020.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1148/radiol.2020202222DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7301613PMC
November 2020

Discovery of a duplicated inferior vena cava during surgical resection for retroperitoneal sarcoma.

Dig Liver Dis 2020 10 5;52(10):1201-1202. Epub 2020 Jun 5.

Department of General and Digestive Surgery, Hautepierre Hospital, Strasbourg University Hospital, 1 avenue Molière, 67200, Strasbourg, France; Interface Recherche Fondamentale et Appliquée en Cancérologie, INSERM Unit 1113, 3 avenue Molière, 67200, Strasbourg.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.dld.2020.04.030DOI Listing
October 2020

High risk of thrombosis in patients with severe SARS-CoV-2 infection: a multicenter prospective cohort study.

Intensive Care Med 2020 06 4;46(6):1089-1098. Epub 2020 May 4.

Service de Médecine Intensive Réanimation, Nouvel Hôpital Civil, Hôpitaux universitaires de Strasbourg, 1, Place de l'Hôpital, 67091, Strasbourg Cedex, France.

Purpose: Little evidence of increased thrombotic risk is available in COVID-19 patients. Our purpose was to assess thrombotic risk in severe forms of SARS-CoV-2 infection.

Methods: All patients referred to 4 intensive care units (ICUs) from two centers of a French tertiary hospital for acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) due to COVID-19 between March 3rd and 31st 2020 were included. Medical history, symptoms, biological data and imaging were prospectively collected. Propensity score matching was performed to analyze the occurrence of thromboembolic events between non-COVID-19 ARDS and COVID-19 ARDS patients.

Results: 150 COVID-19 patients were included (122 men, median age 63 [53; 71] years, SAPSII 49 [37; 64] points). Sixty-four clinically relevant thrombotic complications were diagnosed in 150 patients, mainly pulmonary embolisms (16.7%). 28/29 patients (96.6%) receiving continuous renal replacement therapy experienced circuit clotting. Three thrombotic occlusions (in 2 patients) of centrifugal pump occurred in 12 patients (8%) supported by ECMO. Most patients (> 95%) had elevated D-dimer and fibrinogen. No patient developed disseminated intravascular coagulation. Von Willebrand (vWF) activity, vWF antigen and FVIII were considerably increased, and 50/57 tested patients (87.7%) had positive lupus anticoagulant. Comparison with non-COVID-19 ARDS patients (n = 145) confirmed that COVID-19 ARDS patients (n = 77) developed significantly more thrombotic complications, mainly pulmonary embolisms (11.7 vs. 2.1%, p < 0.008). Coagulation parameters significantly differed between the two groups.

Conclusion: Despite anticoagulation, a high number of patients with ARDS secondary to COVID-19 developed life-threatening thrombotic complications. Higher anticoagulation targets than in usual critically ill patients should therefore probably be suggested.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00134-020-06062-xDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7197634PMC
June 2020

Acute Pulmonary Embolism in Patients with COVID-19 at CT Angiography and Relationship to d-Dimer Levels.

Radiology 2020 09 23;296(3):E189-E191. Epub 2020 Apr 23.

From the Hôpitaux Universitaires de Strasbourg, Service de Radiologie, Nouvel Hôpital Civil, 1 place de l'Hôpital, 67000, Strasbourg, France (I.L.L., A.L., P.L., C.R., M.O.); Hôpitaux Universitaires de Strasbourg, Service de Réanimation Polyvalente, Nouvel Hôpital Civil, Strasbourg, France (X.D., C.P., O.C.); Hôpitaux universitaires de Strasbourg, Groupe Méthodes en Recherche Clinique (GMRC), Hôpital Civil, Strasbourg, France (F. Séverac); Hôpitaux Universitaires de Strasbourg, Service de Médecine Intensive et Réanimation, Nouvel Hôpital Civil, Strasbourg, France (J.H.); ImmunoRhumatologie Moléculaire, INSERM UMR_S1109, LabEx TRANSPLANTEX, Centre de Recherche d'Immunologie et d'Hématologie, Faculté de Médecine, Fédération Hospitalo-Universitaire (FHU) OMICARE, Fédération de Médecine Translationnelle de Strasbourg (FMTS), Université de Strasbourg (UNISTRA), Strasbourg, France (J.H.); Hôpitaux Universitaires de Strasbourg, Service de Médecine Intensive-Réanimation, Hôpital de Hautepierre I, Strasbourg, France (F. Schneider); Hôpitaux Universitaires de Strasbourg, Service d'Accueil des Urgences, Nouvel Hôpital Civil, Strasbourg, France (P.B.); and Hôpitaux Universitaires de Strasbourg, Service de Radiologie, Hôpital de Hautepierre I, Strasbourg, France (S.M.).

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1148/radiol.2020201561DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7233397PMC
September 2020