Publications by authors named "Michelle Ouyang"

8 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

PTCH1-GLI1 Fusion-Positive Ovarian Tumor: Report of a Unique Case With Response to Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitor Pazopanib.

J Natl Compr Canc Netw 2021 09 20;19(9):998-1004. Epub 2021 Sep 20.

Department of Pathology, and.

Recurrent GLI1 gene fusions have been recently described in a subset of soft tissue tumors showing a distinct monotonous epithelioid morphology with a rich capillary network and frequent S100 protein expression. Three different fusion partners-ACTB, MALAT1, and PTCH1-have been reported with the PTCH1-GLI1 fusion from 2 patients only, both with head and neck tumors. Herein, we report for the first time a PTCH1-GLI1 fusion in a primary ovarian tumor from a female patient aged 54 years who presented with a 21-cm right ovarian mass and mesenteric metastasis. The tumor was diagnosed as "favor malignant melanoma" based on histologic examination and extensive immunohistochemistry studies. The patient received 4 cycles of pembrolizumab and 2 cycles of trabectedin but developed multiple metastases. A next-generation sequencing-based assay detected a PTCH1-GLI1 fusion, which led to a revised pathologic diagnosis and a change of the patient's management. The patient was switched to the tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) pazopanib to target the sonic hedgehog pathway. Her disease was stable 49 months post TKI therapy. Our case report is the first to show that a tumor with GLI1 oncogenic activation was sensitive to a TKI. The morphologic and immunohistochemistry similarities of our patient's tumor to other recently described tumors harboring GLI1 fusions suggest that these tumors may all belong to the same entity of GLI1 fusion-positive neoplasms and may be treated similarly.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.6004/jnccn.2021.7058DOI Listing
September 2021

A Review of Clinical and Imaging Findings in Tumefactive Demyelination.

AJR Am J Roentgenol 2021 May 19:1-12. Epub 2021 May 19.

Department of Radiology, University of Michigan, 1500 E Medical Center Dr, Ann Arbor, MI 48109.

Tumefactive demyelination mimics primary brain neoplasms on imaging, often necessitating brain biopsy. This article reviews the literature for the clinical and radiologic findings of tumefactive demyelination in various disease processes to facilitate identification of tumefactive demyelination on imaging. Both clinical and radiologic findings must be integrated to distinguish tumefactive demyelinating lesions from similarly appearing lesions on imaging. Further research on the immunopathogenesis of tumefactive demyelination and associated conditions will elucidate their interrelationship.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.2214/AJR.20.23226DOI Listing
May 2021

Unbiased screen identifies aripiprazole as a modulator of abundance of the polyglutamine disease protein, ataxin-3.

Brain 2016 11;139(11):2891-2908

Department of Neurology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI, USA.

No disease-modifying treatment exists for the fatal neurodegenerative polyglutamine disease known both as Machado-Joseph disease and spinocerebellar ataxia type 3. As a potential route to therapy, we identified small molecules that reduce levels of the mutant disease protein, ATXN3. Screens of a small molecule collection, including 1250 Food and Drug Administration-approved drugs, in a novel cell-based assay, followed by secondary screens in brain slice cultures from transgenic mice expressing the human disease gene, identified the atypical antipsychotic aripiprazole as one of the hits. Aripiprazole increased longevity in a Drosophila model of Machado-Joseph disease and effectively reduced aggregated ATXN3 species in flies and in brains of transgenic mice treated for 10 days. The aripiprazole-mediated decrease in ATXN3 abundance may reflect a complex response culminating in the modulation of specific components of cellular protein homeostasis. Aripiprazole represents a potentially promising therapeutic drug for Machado-Joseph disease and possibly other neurological proteinopathies.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/brain/aww228DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5840879PMC
November 2016

The deubiquitinase ataxin-3 requires Rad23 and DnaJ-1 for its neuroprotective role in Drosophila melanogaster.

Neurobiol Dis 2015 Oct 22;82:12-21. Epub 2015 May 22.

Department of Pharmacology, Wayne State University School of Medicine, Detroit, MI 48201, USA; Cancer Biology Graduate Program, Wayne State University School of Medicine, Detroit, MI 48201, USA; Department of Neurology, Wayne State University School of Medicine, Detroit, MI 48201, USA.

Ataxin-3 is a deubiquitinase and polyglutamine (polyQ) disease protein with a protective role in Drosophila melanogaster models of neurodegeneration. In the fruit fly, wild-type ataxin-3 suppresses toxicity from several polyQ disease proteins, including a pathogenic version of itself that causes spinocerebellar ataxia type 3 and pathogenic huntingtin, which causes Huntington's disease. The molecular partners of ataxin-3 in this protective function are unclear. Here, we report that ataxin-3 requires its direct interaction with the ubiquitin-binding and proteasome-associated protein, Rad23 (known as hHR23A/B in mammals) in order to suppress toxicity from polyQ species in Drosophila. According to additional studies, ataxin-3 does not rely on autophagy or the proteasome to suppress polyQ-dependent toxicity in fly eyes. Instead this deubiquitinase, through its interaction with Rad23, leads to increased protein levels of the co-chaperone DnaJ-1 and depends on it to protect against degeneration. Through DnaJ-1, our data connect ataxin-3 and Rad23 to protective processes involved with protein folding rather than increased turnover of toxic polyQ species.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.nbd.2015.05.010DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4710962PMC
October 2015

DnaJ-1 and karyopherin α3 suppress degeneration in a new Drosophila model of Spinocerebellar Ataxia Type 6.

Hum Mol Genet 2015 Aug 7;24(15):4385-96. Epub 2015 May 7.

Department of Pharmacology, Cancer Biology Graduate Program and Department of Neurology, Wayne State University School of Medicine, Detroit, MI 48201, USA and

Spinocerebellar ataxia type 6 (SCA6) belongs to the family of CAG/polyglutamine (polyQ)-dependent neurodegenerative disorders. SCA6 is caused by abnormal expansion in a CAG trinucleotide repeat within exon 47 of CACNA1A, a bicistronic gene that encodes α1A, a P/Q-type calcium channel subunit and a C-terminal protein, termed α1ACT. Expansion of the CAG/polyQ region of CACNA1A occurs within α1ACT and leads to ataxia. There are few animal models of SCA6. Here, we describe the generation and characterization of the first Drosophila melanogaster models of SCA6, which express the entire human α1ACT protein with a normal or expanded polyQ. The polyQ-expanded version of α1ACT recapitulates the progressively degenerative nature of SCA6 when expressed in various fly tissues and the presence of densely staining aggregates. Additional studies identify the co-chaperone DnaJ-1 as a potential therapeutic target for SCA6. Expression of DnaJ-1 potently suppresses α1ACT-dependent degeneration and lethality, concomitant with decreased aggregation and reduced nuclear localization of the pathogenic protein. Mutating the nuclear importer karyopherin α3 also leads to reduced toxicity from pathogenic α1ACT. Little is known about the steps leading to degeneration in SCA6 and the means to protect neurons in this disease are lacking. Invertebrate animal models of SCA6 can expand our understanding of molecular sequelae related to degeneration in this disorder and lead to the rapid identification of cellular components that can be targeted to treat it.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/hmg/ddv174DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4492400PMC
August 2015

Ubiquitin-binding site 2 of ataxin-3 prevents its proteasomal degradation by interacting with Rad23.

Nat Commun 2014 Aug 21;5:4638. Epub 2014 Aug 21.

1] Department of Pharmacology, Wayne State University School of Medicine, 540 E Canfield, Scott Hall Room 3108, Detroit, Michigan 48201, USA [2] Department of Neurology, Wayne State University School of Medicine, 540 E Canfield, Scott Hall Room 3108, Detroit, Michigan 48201, USA [3] Cancer Biology Program, Wayne State University School of Medicine, 540 E Canfield, Scott Hall Room 3108, Detroit, Michigan 48201, USA.

Polyglutamine repeat expansion in ataxin-3 causes neurodegeneration in the most common dominant ataxia, spinocerebellar ataxia type 3 (SCA3). Since reducing levels of disease proteins improves pathology in animals, we investigated how ataxin-3 is degraded. Here we show that, unlike most proteins, ataxin-3 turnover does not require its ubiquitination, but is regulated by ubiquitin-binding site 2 (UbS2) on its N terminus. Mutating UbS2 decreases ataxin-3 protein levels in cultured mammalian cells and in Drosophila melanogaster by increasing its proteasomal turnover. Ataxin-3 interacts with the proteasome-associated proteins Rad23A/B through UbS2. Knockdown of Rad23 in cultured cells and in Drosophila results in lower levels of ataxin-3 protein. Importantly, reducing Rad23 suppresses ataxin-3-dependent degeneration in flies. We present a mechanism for ubiquitination-independent degradation that is impeded by protein interactions with proteasome-associated factors. We conclude that UbS2 is a potential target through which to enhance ataxin-3 degradation for SCA3 therapy.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/ncomms5638DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4237202PMC
August 2014

Ubiquitination regulates the neuroprotective function of the deubiquitinase ataxin-3 in vivo.

J Biol Chem 2013 Nov 8;288(48):34460-9. Epub 2013 Oct 8.

From the Departments of Pharmacology and Neurology and.

Deubiquitinases (DUBs) are proteases that regulate various cellular processes by controlling protein ubiquitination. Cell-based studies indicate that the regulation of the activity of DUBs is important for homeostasis and is achieved by multiple mechanisms, including through their own ubiquitination. However, the physiological significance of the ubiquitination of DUBs to their functions in vivo is unclear. Here, we report that ubiquitination of the DUB ataxin-3 at lysine residue 117, which markedly enhances its protease activity in vitro, is critical for its ability to suppress toxic protein-dependent degeneration in Drosophila melanogaster. Compared with ataxin-3 with only Lys-117 present, ataxin-3 that does not become ubiquitinated performs significantly less efficiently in suppressing or delaying the onset of toxic protein-dependent degeneration in flies. According to further studies, the C terminus of Hsc70-interacting protein (CHIP), an E3 ubiquitin ligase that ubiquitinates ataxin-3 in vitro, is dispensable for its ubiquitination in vivo and is not required for the neuroprotective function of this DUB in Drosophila. Our work also suggests that ataxin-3 suppresses degeneration by regulating toxic protein aggregation rather than stability.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1074/jbc.M113.513903DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3843061PMC
November 2013

Toward RNAi therapy for the polyglutamine disease Machado-Joseph disease.

Mol Ther 2013 Oct 14;21(10):1898-908. Epub 2013 Jun 14.

Department of Neurology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan, USA.

Machado-Joseph disease (MJD) is a dominantly inherited ataxia caused by a polyglutamine-coding expansion in the ATXN3 gene. Suppressing expression of the toxic gene product represents a promising approach to therapy for MJD and other polyglutamine diseases. We performed an extended therapeutic trial of RNA interference (RNAi) targeting ATXN3 in a mouse model expressing the full human disease gene and recapitulating key disease features. Adeno-associated virus (AAV) encoding a microRNA (miRNA)-like molecule, miRATXN3, was delivered bilaterally into the cerebellum of 6- to 8-week-old MJD mice, which were then followed up to end-stage disease to assess the safety and efficacy of anti-ATXN3 RNAi. Despite effective, lifelong suppression of ATXN3 in the cerebellum and the apparent safety of miRATXN3, motor impairment was not ameliorated in treated MJD mice and survival was not prolonged. These results with an otherwise effective RNAi agent suggest that targeting a large extent of the cerebellum alone may not be sufficient for effective human therapy. Artificial miRNAs or other nucleotide-based suppression strategies targeting ATXN3 more widely in the brain should be considered in future preclinical tests.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/mt.2013.144DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3808129PMC
October 2013
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