Publications by authors named "Michelle E G Weijzen"

3 Publications

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Ingestion of Free Amino Acids Compared with an Equivalent Amount of Intact Protein Results in More Rapid Amino Acid Absorption and Greater Postprandial Plasma Amino Acid Availability Without Affecting Muscle Protein Synthesis Rates in Young Adults in a Double-Blind Randomized Trial.

J Nutr 2021 Oct 12. Epub 2021 Oct 12.

Department of Human Biology, School of Nutrition and Translational Research in Metabolism (NUTRIM), Maastricht University Medical Centre+, Maastricht, The Netherlands.

Background: The rate of protein digestion and amino acid absorption determines the postprandial rise in circulating amino acids and modulates postprandial muscle protein synthesis rates.

Objective: We sought to compare protein digestion, amino acid absorption kinetics, and the postprandial muscle protein synthetic response following ingestion of intact milk protein or an equivalent amount of free amino acids.

Methods: Twenty-four healthy, young participants (mean ± SD age: 22 ± 3 y and BMI 23 ± 2 kg/m2; sex: 12 male and 12 female participants) received a primed continuous infusion of l-[ring-2H5]-phenylalanine and l-[ring-3,5-2H2]-tyrosine, after which they ingested either 30 g intrinsically l-[1-13C]-phenylalanine-labeled milk protein or an equivalent amount of free amino acids labeled with l-[1-13C]-phenylalanine. Blood samples and muscle biopsies were obtained to assess protein digestion and amino acid absorption kinetics (secondary outcome), whole-body protein net balance (secondary outcome), and mixed muscle protein synthesis rates (primary outcome) throughout the 6-h postprandial period.

Results: Postprandial plasma amino acid concentrations increased after ingestion of intact milk protein and free amino acids (both P < 0.001), with a greater increase following ingestion of the free amino acids than following ingestion of intact milk protein (P-time × treatment < 0.001). Exogenous phenylalanine release into plasma, assessed over the 6-h postprandial period, was greater with free amino acid ingestion (76 ± 9%) than with milk protein treatment (59 ± 10%; P < 0.001). Ingestion of free amino acids and intact milk protein increased mixed muscle protein synthesis rates (P-time < 0.001), with no differences between treatments (from 0.037 ± 0.015%/h to 0.053 ± 0.014%/h and 0.039 ± 0.016%/h to 0.051 ± 0.010%/h, respectively; P-time × treatment = 0.629).

Conclusions: Ingestion of a bolus of free amino acids leads to more rapid amino acid absorption and greater postprandial plasma amino acid availability than ingestion of an equivalent amount of intact milk protein. Ingestion of free amino acids may be preferred over ingestion of intact protein in conditions where protein digestion and amino acid absorption are compromised.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/jn/nxab305DOI Listing
October 2021

Casein Protein Processing Strongly Modulates Post-Prandial Plasma Amino Acid Responses In Vivo in Humans.

Nutrients 2020 Jul 31;12(8). Epub 2020 Jul 31.

NUTRIM School of Nutrition and Translation Research in Metabolism, Maastricht University Medical Centre, P.O. Box 616, 6200 MD Maastricht, The Netherlands.

Micellar casein is characterized as a slowly digestible protein source, and its structure can be modulated by various food processing techniques to modify its functional properties. However, little is known about the impact of such modifications on casein protein digestion and amino acid absorption kinetics and the subsequent post-prandial plasma amino acid responses. In the present study, we determined post-prandial aminoacidemia following ingestion of isonitrogenous amounts of casein protein (40 g) provided as micellar casein (Mi-CAS), calcium caseinate (Ca-CAS), or cross-linked sodium caseinate (XL-CAS). Fifteen healthy, young men (age: 26 ± 4 years, BMI: 23 ± 1 kg·m) participated in this randomized cross-over study and ingested 40 g Mi-Cas, Ca-CAS, and XL-CAS protein, with a ~1 week washout between treatments. On each trial day, arterialized blood samples were collected at regular intervals during a 6 h post-prandial period to assess plasma amino acid concentrations using ultra-performance liquid chromatography. Plasma amino acid concentrations were higher following the ingestion of XL-CAS when compared to Mi-CAS and Ca-CAS from t = 15 to 90 min (all < 0.05). Plasma amino acid concentrations were higher following ingestion of Mi-CAS compared to Ca-CAS from t = 30 to 45 min (both < 0.05). Plasma total amino acids iAUC were higher following the ingestion of XL-CAS when compared to Ca-CAS (294 ± 63 vs. 260 ± 75 mmol·L, = 0.006), with intermediate values following Mi-CAS ingestion (270 ± 63 mmol·L, > 0.05). In conclusion, cross-linked sodium caseinate is more rapidly digested when compared to micellar casein and calcium caseinate. Protein processing can strongly modulate the post-prandial rise in plasma amino acid bioavailability in vivo in humans.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/nu12082299DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7468913PMC
July 2020

During Hospitalization, Older Patients at Risk for Malnutrition Consume <0.65 Grams of Protein per Kilogram Body Weight per Day.

Nutr Clin Pract 2020 Aug 24;35(4):655-663. Epub 2020 Jun 24.

Department of Human Biology, School of Nutrition and Translational Research in Metabolism (NUTRIM), Maastricht University Medical Centre+, Maastricht, the Netherlands.

Background: Malnutrition is prevalent in hospitalized patients. To support muscle maintenance in older and chronically ill patients, a protein intake of 1.2-1.5 g/kg/d has been recommended during hospitalization. We assessed daily protein intake levels and distribution in older patients at risk for malnutrition during hospitalization.

Methods: In this prospective, observational study, we measured actual food and food supplement consumption in patients (n = 102; age, 68 ± 14 years; hospital stay, 14 [8-28] days) at risk of malnutrition during hospitalization. Food provided by hospital meals, ONS, and snacks and the actual amount of food (not) consumed were weighed and recorded for all patients.

Results: Hospital meals provided 1.03 [0.77-1.26] protein, whereas actual protein consumption was only 0.65 [0.37-0.93] g/kg/d. Protein intake at breakfast, lunch, and dinner was 10 [6-15], 9 [5-14], and 13 [9-18] g, respectively. The use of ONS (n = 62) resulted in greater energy (1.26 [0.40-1.79] MJ/d, 300 [100-430] kcal/d) and protein intake levels (11 [4-16] g/d), without changing the macronutrient composition of the diet.

Conclusion: Despite protein provision of ∼1.0 g/kg/d, protein intake remains well below these values (∼0.65 g/kg/d), as 30%-40% of the provided food and supplements is not consumed. Provision of ONS may increase energy and protein intake but does not change the macronutrient composition of the diet. Current nutrition strategies to achieve the recommended daily protein intake in older patients during their hospitalization are not as effective as generally assumed.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ncp.10542DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7384011PMC
August 2020
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