Publications by authors named "Michele H Bloch"

4 Publications

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Behavioral Research in Cancer Prevention and Control: Emerging Challenges and Opportunities.

J Natl Cancer Inst 2021 Jul 7. Epub 2021 Jul 7.

Chief, Health Communication and Informatics Research Branch, National Cancer Institute.

It is estimated that behaviors such as poor diet, alcohol consumption, tobacco use, sedentary behavior, and excessive ultraviolet exposure account for nearly half of all cancer morbidity and mortality. Accordingly, the behavioral, social, and communication sciences have been important contributors to cancer prevention and control research, with methodological advances and implementation science helping to produce optimally effective interventions. To sustain these contributions, it is vital to adapt to the contemporary context. Efforts must consider ancillary effects of the 2019 coronavirus disease pandemic, profound changes in the information environment and public understanding of and trust in science, renewed attention to structural racism and social determinants of health, and the rapidly increasing population of cancer survivors. Within this context, it is essential to accelerate reductions in tobacco use across all population subgroups; consider new models of energy balance (diet, physical activity, sedentary behavior); increase awareness of alcohol as a risk factor for cancer, and identify better communication practices in the context of cancer-related decisions such as screening and genetic testing. Successful integration of behavioral research and cancer prevention depends on working globally and seamlessly across disciplines, taking a multilevel approach where possible. Methodological and analytic approaches should be emphasized in research training programs and should employ new and underutilized data sources and technologies. As the leadership core of the National Cancer Institute's Behavioral Research Program, we reflect on these challenges and opportunities and consider implications for the next phase of behavioral research in cancer prevention and control.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/jnci/djab139DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8344826PMC
July 2021

Using Digital Technologies to Reach Tobacco Users Who Want to Quit: Evidence From the National Cancer Institute's Smokefree.gov Initiative.

Am J Prev Med 2021 03;60(3 Suppl 2):S172-S184

Tobacco Control Research Branch, Behavioral Research Program, Division of Cancer Control and Population Sciences, National Cancer Institute, Rockville, Maryland.

The rapid growth of smartphone ownership and broadband access has created new opportunities to reach smokers with cessation information and support using digital technologies. These technologies can both complement and be integrated with traditional support modalities such as telephone quitlines and 1-on-1 clinical cessation counseling. The National Cancer Institute's Smokefree.gov Initiative provides free, evidence-based cessation support to the public through a multimodal suite of digital interventions, including several mobile-optimized websites, text messaging programs, and 2 mobile applications. In addition to digital resources directed at the general population, the Smokefree.gov Initiative includes population-specific resources targeted to adolescents, women, military veterans, Spanish speakers, older adults, and other populations. This paper describes the reach and use of the Smokefree.gov Initiative's resources over a 5-year period between 2014 and 2018, including how users interact with the program's digital content in ways that facilitate engagement with live counseling support. Use of Smokefree.gov Initiative resources has grown steadily over time; in 2018 alone, approximately 7-8 million people accessed Smokefree.gov Initiative web- and mobile-based resources. Smokefree.gov Initiative utilization data show that people take advantage of the full range of technology tools and options offered as part of the Smokefree.gov Initiative's multiplatform intervention. The Smokefree.gov Initiative experience suggests that offering different, complementary technology options to meet the needs and preferences of smokers has the potential to meaningfully expand the reach of cessation treatment.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.amepre.2020.08.008DOI Listing
March 2021

The conception of the ABCD study: From substance use to a broad NIH collaboration.

Dev Cogn Neurosci 2018 Aug 10;32:4-7. Epub 2017 Oct 10.

National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA), National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD, USA.

Adolescence is a time of dramatic changes in brain structure and function, and the adolescent brain is highly susceptible to being altered by experiences like substance use. However, there is much we have yet to learn about how these experiences influence brain development, how they promote or interfere with later health outcomes, or even what healthy brain development looks like. A large longitudinal study beginning in early adolescence could help us understand the normal variability in adolescent brain and cognitive development and tease apart the many factors that influence it. Recent advances in neuroimaging, informatics, and genetics technologies have made it feasible to conduct a study of sufficient size and scope to answer many outstanding questions. At the same time, several Institutes across the NIH recognized the value of collaborating in such a project because of its ability to address the role of biological, environmental, and behavioral factors like gender, pubertal hormones, sports participation, and social/economic disparities on brain development as well as their association with the emergence and progression of substance use and mental illness including suicide risk. Thus, the Adolescent Brain Cognitive Development study was created to answer the most pressing public health questions of our day.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.dcn.2017.10.002DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5893417PMC
August 2018

Prenatal tobacco prevention and cessation interventions for women in low- and middle-income countries.

Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand 2010 ;89(4):442-453

National Cancer Institute, Tobacco Control Research Branch, Bethesda, Maryland, USA.

Although the prevalence of tobacco use is decreasing in many high-income countries, it is increasing in many low- and middle-income countries. The health and economic burden of increasing tobacco use and dependence is predictable and will have devastating effects in countries with limited resources, particularly for vulnerable populations such as pregnant women. We sought to review effective tobacco prevention and intervention strategies for decreasing tobacco use and secondhand smoke exposure before and during pregnancy in high-, middle-, and low-income countries. We reviewed several types of interventions, including population-level efforts (increasing tobacco prices, implementing tobacco control policies), community interventions, clinical interventions, and pharmacological treatments. A second purpose of this report is to present findings of an international expert working group that was convened to review the evidence and to establish research priorities in the following areas: (a) preventing the uptake and reducing tobacco use among girls and women of reproductive age; and (b) reducing tobacco use and secondhand smoke exposure among pregnant women. The working group considered the evidence on existing interventions in terms of burden of disease, intervention impact, intervention costs, feasibility of integration into existing services, uniqueness of the contribution, and overall feasibility. Finally, we present the working group's recommendations for intervention research priorities.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3109/00016341003678450DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3918940PMC
May 2010
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