Publications by authors named "Michalina Kupsik"

5 Publications

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Single and double modified salinomycin analogs target stem-like cells in 2D and 3D breast cancer models.

Biomed Pharmacother 2021 Jun 12;141:111815. Epub 2021 Jun 12.

Department of Neurobiology and Developmental Sciences, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, Little Rock, AR 72205, United States.

Breast cancer remains one of the leading cancers among women. Cancer stem cells (CSCs) are tumor-initiating cells which drive progression, metastasis, and reoccurrence of the disease. CSCs are resistant to conventional chemo- and radio-therapies and their ability to survive such treatment enables tumor reestablishment. Metastasis is the main cause of mortality in women with breast cancer, thus advances in treatment will depend on therapeutic strategies targeting CSCs. Salinomycin (SAL) is a naturally occurring polyether ionophore antibiotic known for its anticancer activity towards several types of tumor cells. In the present work, a library of 17 C1-single and C1/C20-double modified SAL analogs was screened to identify compounds with improved activity against breast CSCs. Six single- and two double-modified analogs were more potent (IC range of 1.1 ± 0.1-1.4 ± 0.2 µM) toward the breast cancer cell line MDA-MB-231 compared to SAL (IC of 4.9 ± 1.6 µM). Double-modified compound 17 was found to be more efficacious than SAL against the majority of cancer cell lines in the NCI-60 Human Tumor Cell Line Panel. Compound 17 was more potent than SAL in inhibiting cell migration and cell renewal properties of MDA-MB-231 cells, as well as inducing selective loss of the CD44/CD24 stem-cell-like subpopulation in both monolayer (2D) and organoid (3D) culture. The present findings highlight the therapeutic potential of SAL analogs towards breast CSCs and identify select compounds that merit further study and clinical development.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.biopha.2021.111815DOI Listing
June 2021

What do women really think? Patient understanding of breast cancer risk.

Breast J 2019 11 18;25(6):1320-1322. Epub 2019 Jul 18.

Division of Breast Surgical Oncology, Advocate Lutheran General Hospital, Park Ridge, Illinois.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/tbj.13472DOI Listing
November 2019

Giant juvenile fibroadenoma in a 9-year-old: A case presentation and review of the current literature.

Breast Dis 2017 ;37(2):95-98

Department of Surgery, Advocate Lutheran General Hospital, Park Ridge, IL 60068, USA.

Juvenile fibroadenoma is the most common breast mass in adolescents accounting for 0.5-4% of all cases of fibroadenomas. Giant fibroadenomas are well-circumscribed, firm breast masses characterized by proliferation of epithelial and connective tissue. They are defined as being larger than 5 cm or weighing more than 500 g. The peak age has been reported between the ages of 17 and 20, with less than 5% of these in patients less than 18-years-old.We present a 9-year-old, pre-menstrual, Nigerian female with no known family history of breast masses or cancers who developed spontaneous giant fibroadenoma measuring approximately 13  cm × 13 cm. Rapid growth of a breast mass can be of great concern to such young patients whose breasts are in the early formative stages. It is important to promptly rule out malignant processes or phyllodes tumor, and educate young patients and their families on treatment options that fit their unique concerns and circumstances.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3233/BD-160250DOI Listing
September 2018

An infant with an alopecic plaque on the scalp and ocular choristomas: case presentation. Diagnosis: Encephalocraniocutaneous lipomatosis (ECCL).

Pediatr Dermatol 2013 Jul-Aug;30(4):491-2

School of Medicine, University of Washington, Renton, Washington 98055, USA.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1525-1470.2012.01837.xDOI Listing
February 2014

Responsiveness of the reproductive axis to a single missed evening meal in young adult males.

Am J Hum Biol 2010 Nov-Dec;22(6):775-81

Department of Anthropology, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington 98195, USA.

Objectives: The male reproductive axis is responsive to energetic deficits, including multiday fasts, but little is known about brief periods of fasting (<24 hours). Reduced testosterone in low-energy balance situations is hypothesized to reflect redirection of resources from reproduction to survival. This study tests the hypothesis that testosterone levels decrease during a minor caloric deficiency by assessing the effects of a single missed (evening) meal on morning testosterone in 23 healthy male participants, age 19-36.

Methods: Participants provided daily saliva and urine samples for two baseline days and the morning following an evening fast (water only after 4 PM). Testosterone, cortisol, and luteinizing hormone were measured with enzyme immunoassays.

Results: Fasting specimens had significantly lower overnight urinary luteinizing hormone (P = 0.045) and morning salivary testosterone than baseline (P = 0.037). In contrast to morning salivary testosterone, there was a significant increase in overnight urinary testosterone (P = 0.000) following the evening fast, suggesting an increase in urinary clearance rates. There was a marginal increase in overnight urinary cortisol (P = 0.100), but not morning salivary cortisol (P = 0.589).

Conclusion: These results suggest the male reproductive axis may react more quickly to energetic imbalances than has been previously appreciated.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ajhb.21079DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3111063PMC
February 2011
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