Publications by authors named "Michael R Sprehe"

3 Publications

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Evaluating the Role of Birth Weight and Gestational Age on Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia Risk Among Those of Hispanic Ethnicity.

Pediatr Hematol Oncol 2015 3;32(6):382-9. Epub 2015 Aug 3.

a Department of Pediatrics, Baylor College of Medicine , Texas Children's Cancer Center , Houston , Texas , USA.

High birth weight is an established risk factor for childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), especially in children younger than 5 years of age at diagnosis. The goal of this study was to explore the association between being born large for gestational age and the risk for ALL by race/ethnicity to determine if the role of this risk factor differed by these characteristics. The authors compared birth certificate data of 575 children diagnosed with ALL who were younger than 5 years and included in the Texas Cancer Registry, Texas Department of Health, between the years 1995 and 2003 with 11,379 controls matched by birth year. Stratified odds ratios were calculated for risk of ALL by birth weight for gestational age, categorized in 3 groups, small, appropriate, and large for gestational age (SGA, AGA, and LGA, respectively), for each race/ethnicity group. The risk of developing ALL was higher among Hispanics who were LGA (odds ratio [OR] = 1.90, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.34-2.68) compared with LGA non-Hispanic whites (OR = 1.27, 95% CI: 0.87-1.86) after adjusting for infant gender, year of birth, maternal age, birth order, and presence of Down syndrome. However, the difference was not statistically significant. These results suggest that there may be differences in the association between higher growth in utero and risk of childhood ALL among Hispanics versus non-Hispanic whites.
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July 2016

Comparison of birth weight corrected for gestational age and birth weight alone in prediction of development of childhood leukemia and central nervous system tumors.

Pediatr Blood Cancer 2010 Feb;54(2):242-9

Department of Pediatrics, Baylor College of Medicine, Texas Children's Cancer Center, Houston, Texas, USA.

Introduction: High birth weight (HBW) is an established risk factor for childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). The purpose of this study was to evaluate if birth weight (BW) corrected-for-gestational age is a better predictor than BW alone for occurrence of ALL and other malignancies in children.

Materials And Methods: Birth certificate data of 2,254 children with cancer who were younger than 5 years old at diagnosis and registered at Texas Cancer Registry during 1995-2003 were compared to 11,734 age-matched controls. Multivariable logistic regression was used to compare models with BW corrected-for-gestational age and BW alone.

Results: Compared to children who were appropriate for gestational age (AGA), children who were large for gestational age (LGA) at birth had a 1.66 times (95% CI 1.32-2.10) higher odds of ALL. Similarly, children with a BW > or =4,000 g had a 1.5 times (95% CI 1.18-1.89) higher odds for ALL, compared to children who weighed >2,500 and <4,000 g at birth. Using model diagnostics, the model containing BW corrected-for-gestational age was a better predictor than the model with BW alone [Akaike's Information Criterion (AIC) 4,646 vs. 4,658, respectively]. Odds ratios (OR) were similar for LGA children who were <4,000 g and LGA children who were > or =4,000 g (OR = 1.5, 95% CI 0.97-2.5 and OR = 1.67, 95% CI 1.29-2.16, respectively). BW was not an independent risk factor for acute myeloid leukemia or brain tumors.

Conclusion: BW corrected-for-gestational age is a better predictor than BW alone of risk for ALL. Future studies using BW variable should incorporate gestational age in their analyses.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/pbc.22308DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2795053PMC
February 2010

Pediatric palliative care.

S D Med 2008 ;Spec No.:32-4

Pediatric Critical Care, Sanford Children's Specilaity Clinic, Sanford School of Medicine, University of South Dakota, SD, USA.

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September 2008
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