Dr. Michael Numan, PhD - University of New Mexico - Research Professor

Dr. Michael Numan

PhD

University of New Mexico

Research Professor

Albuquerque, NM | United States

Main Specialties: Biology

Additional Specialties: Behavioral Neuroscience; Neurobiology of Parental Behavior; Neurobiology of Social Behavior

Dr. Michael Numan, PhD - University of New Mexico - Research Professor

Dr. Michael Numan

PhD

Introduction

Michael Numan received his Ph.D. from the University of Chicago. He is a Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) and the Association for Psychological Science (APS). Most of his research, which focuses on the neural mechanisms of maternal behavior, was conducted while he was a Professor of Psychology and Behavioral Neuroscience at Boston College (1975-2012). His research at Boston College received significant support from the National Institutes of Health and the National Science Foundation. He is the author of numerous scientific articles relating to the neurobiology of maternal behavior and he is also the author of two important books, The Neurobiology of Parental Behavior (2003, with Thomas Insel) and Neurobiology of Social Behavior: Toward an Understanding of the Prosocial and Antisocial Brain (2015). He is currently a Research Professor at the University of New Mexico.

Primary Affiliation: University of New Mexico - Albuquerque, NM , United States

Specialties:

Additional Specialties:

Education

Aug 1973
University of Chicago
Ph.D.
Biopsychology

Publications

30Publications

445Reads

209Profile Views

649PubMed Central Citations

The Parental Brain: Mechanisms, Development, and Evolution

Authors:
Michael Numan

Book to be published by Oxford University Press in June, 2020

 The Parental Brain: Mechanisms, Development, and Evolution presents a comprehensive analysis of how the brain regulates parental behavior in nonhuman animals and in humans, how these brain mechanisms develop, and how such development can go awry, leading to faulty parental behavior. Further, the proposal is examined that the maternal brain served as a foundation or template for the evolution of other types of strong prosocial bonds in mammals, such as the hyper-prosociality that occurs in humans. Unique aspects of this book are its multilevel perspective and the integration and comparison of animal and human research in order to create a complete understanding of the parental brain.Topics covered include the following: • Maternal, paternal, and alloparental behavior • Hormonal regulation of parental behavior • Oxytocin and parental behavior • Subcortical neural circuits regulating parental behavior in nonhuman mammals • The interactions between cortical and subcortical neural circuits that are associated with parental cognitions, emotions, and behavior in humans • How maternal care directed toward one’s infants influences the development of the parental brain in the affected infants • The intergenerational transmission or continuity of normal and abnormal maternal behavior • The involvement of epigenetics and gene by environment interactions in the development of the parental brain • Evolutionary perspectives on the parental brain, particularly with respect to alloparenting and cooperative breeding that have provided a framework for appreciating how the parental brain could have provided a foundation for the hyper-prosociality that occurs within human social groupsThis book will be a valuable resource for behavioral neuroscientists and neuroendocrinologists, social neuroscientists, developmental psychobiologists and psychologists, anthropologists, and evolutionary psychologists with an interest in parental behavior, mother–infant relationships, child development, and the evolution of prosocial behavior.

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June 2020
7 Reads

Parental Behavior

Authors:
Michael Numan

ISBN 9780128093245

Reference Module in Neuroscience and Biobehavioral Psychology

In most mammals, pregnancy hormone action on the brain triggers maternal behavior. Maternal brain circuits include medial preoptic area (MPOA) projections to the mesolimbic dopamine system. Oxytocin promotes activity within this circuit. Feelings of maternal love may involve the orbitofrontal and insular cortices. Increases in oxytocin and decreases in corticotropin releasing factor within the amygdala facilitate maternal aggression toward dangerous intruders. Faulty maternal behavior increases the likelihood that the mother’s offspring will become poor parents, and a dysfunctional MPOA may be involved. Brain circuits for paternal behavior match maternal circuits, and this parental circuitry may have provided the foundation for other social bonds, such as the monogamous pair bond.

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January 2017
24 Reads

Neural mechanisms of mother-infant bonding and pair bonding: Similarities, differences, and broader implications.

Horm Behav 2016 Jan 7;77:98-112. Epub 2015 Jun 7.

Center for Translational Social Neuroscience, Silvio O. Conte Center for Oxytocin and Social Cognition, Yerkes National Primate Research Center, Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Emory University, Atlanta, GA 30329, United States.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.yhbeh.2015.05.015DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4671834PMC
January 2016
122 Reads
48 Citations
4.632 Impact Factor

The medial preoptic area and the regulation of parental behavior.

Neurosci Bull 2014 Oct 6;30(5):863-5. Epub 2014 Aug 6.

Research Unit for Affiliative Social Behavior, RIKEN Brain Science Institute, Saitama, 351-0198, Japan,

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s12264-014-1462-zDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5562587PMC
October 2014
31 Reads
2 Citations

Does oxytocin modulate variation in maternal caregiving in healthy new mothers?

Brain Res 2014 Sep 23;1580:143-50. Epub 2014 Jan 23.

Institute of Brain, Behaviour and Mental Health, University of Manchester, Manchester M13 9PL, UK.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.brainres.2014.01.020DOI Listing
September 2014
17 Reads
8 Citations
2.843 Impact Factor

Neurobiology of Social Behavior: Toward and Understanding of the Prosocial and Antisocial Brain

Authors:
Michael Numan

This book (Elsevier/Academic Press) presents and analysis of the brain's regulation of prosocial and antisocial behaviors in mammals, including humans. Topics covered include aggression, sexual behaviors and sex differences, parental behavior, social attachment, monogamy, and human sociality (cooperation, altruism).

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August 2014
24 Reads

Flexibility and adaptation of the neural substrate that supports maternal behavior in mammals.

Neurosci Biobehav Rev 2013 Sep 19;37(8):1875-92. Epub 2013 Apr 19.

Departamento de Fisiología, Facultad de Medicina, Universidad de la República, Avda. Gral. Flores 2125, CP 11800, Montevideo, Uruguay. Electronic address:

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.neubiorev.2013.04.004DOI Listing
September 2013
14 Reads
18 Citations
8.802 Impact Factor

New theoretical and experimental approaches on maternal motivation in mammals.

Neurosci Biobehav Rev 2013 Sep 19;37(8):1860-74. Epub 2013 Apr 19.

Departamento de Fisiología, Facultad de Medicina, Universidad de la República, Avda. Gral. Flores 2125, CP 11800, Montevideo, Uruguay. Electronic address:

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.neubiorev.2013.04.003DOI Listing
September 2013
22 Reads
9 Citations
8.802 Impact Factor

Functional, anatomical, and neurochemical differentiation of medial preoptic area subregions in relation to maternal behavior in the mouse.

J Comp Neurol 2013 May;521(7):1633-63

Research Unit for Affiliative Social Behavior, RIKEN Brain Science Institute, Wako, Saitama 351-0198, Japan.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/cne.23251DOI Listing
May 2013
21 Reads
26 Citations
3.230 Impact Factor

Maternal behavior: Neural circuits, stimulus valence, and motivational processes.

Authors:
Michael Numan

Parenting: Science and Practice

This article summarizes research on the brain circuits underlying maternal responsiveness. The research shows how a female mammal's physiological state primes and activates neural and neurochemical mechanisms that promote maternal responsiveness. A dysregulation of such mechanisms would lead to inadequate maternal behavior. Neural models are described to show how hormones and oxytocin might cause a functional rewiring of neural circuits so that infant stimuli that initially provoke antisocial defensive responses can come to evoke prosocial acceptance responses. Similarly, genetic, experiential, and cognitive factors might also influence maternal behavior by affecting the operation of the critical neural circuits.

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June 2012
22 Reads

Neuromolecular basis of parental behavior in laboratory mice and rats: with special emphasis on technical issues of using mouse genetics.

Prog Neuropsychopharmacol Biol Psychiatry 2011 Jul 19;35(5):1205-31. Epub 2011 Feb 19.

Unit for Affiliative Social Behavior, RIKEN Brain Science Institute, Saitama 351-0198, Japan.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.pnpbp.2011.02.008DOI Listing
July 2011
7 Reads
18 Citations
3.690 Impact Factor

Minireview: estrogen receptor-initiated mechanisms causal to mammalian reproductive behaviors.

Endocrinology 2011 Apr 15;152(4):1209-17. Epub 2011 Feb 15.

Laboratory of Neurobiology and Behavior, The Rockefeller University, New York, New York 10021, USA.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1210/en.2010-1007DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3060638PMC
April 2011
7 Reads
14 Citations
4.503 Impact Factor

Hypothalamic interaction with the mesolimbic DA system in the control of the maternal and sexual behaviors in rats.

Neurosci Biobehav Rev 2011 Jan 16;35(3):826-47. Epub 2010 Oct 16.

Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Genetics, University of Virginia, 1340 Jefferson Park Ave, Charlottesville, VA 22908, USA.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.neubiorev.2010.10.003DOI Listing
January 2011
12 Reads
31 Citations
8.802 Impact Factor

The importance of the basolateral/basomedial amygdala for goal-directed maternal responses in postpartum rats.

Behav Brain Res 2010 Dec 11;214(2):368-76. Epub 2010 Jun 11.

Department of Psychology, Boston College, 140 Commonwealth Avenue, Chestnut Hill, MA 02467, United States.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.bbr.2010.06.006DOI Listing
December 2010
8 Reads
9 Citations
3.030 Impact Factor

Dopamine D(1) receptor activation of adenylyl cyclase, not phospholipase C, in the nucleus accumbens promotes maternal behavior onset in rats.

Horm Behav 2010 Jan 30;57(1):96-104. Epub 2009 Sep 30.

Department of Psychology, Boston College, Chestnut Hill, MA 02467, USA.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.yhbeh.2009.09.014DOI Listing
January 2010
9 Reads
12 Citations
4.632 Impact Factor

Temporary inactivation of ventral tegmental area neurons with either muscimol or baclofen reversibly disrupts maternal behavior in rats through different underlying mechanisms.

Behav Neurosci 2009 Aug;123(4):740-51

Department of Psychology, Boston College, 140 Commonwealth Avenue, Chestnut Hill, MA 02467, USA.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/a0016204DOI Listing
August 2009
10 Reads
17 Citations
2.730 Impact Factor

A single injection of 17beta-estradiol at the time of pup presentation promotes the onset of maternal behavior in pregnancy-terminated rats.

Horm Behav 2009 Jun 1;56(1):121-7. Epub 2009 Apr 1.

Department of Psychology, Boston College, Chestnut Hill, MA 02467, USA.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.yhbeh.2009.03.018DOI Listing
June 2009
9 Reads
1 Citation
4.632 Impact Factor

Father of mothering: Jay S. Rosenblatt.

Horm Behav 2009 Apr 14;55(4):484-7. Epub 2009 Jan 14.

University of Toronto at Mississauga, Canada.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.yhbeh.2009.01.001DOI Listing
April 2009
10 Reads
1 Citation
4.632 Impact Factor

Medial preoptic area interactions with dopamine neural systems in the control of the onset and maintenance of maternal behavior in rats.

Front Neuroendocrinol 2009 Jan 5;30(1):46-64. Epub 2008 Nov 5.

Department of Psychology, Boston College, McGuinn Hall, Chestnut Hill, MA 02467, USA.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.yfrne.2008.10.002DOI Listing
January 2009
25 Reads
69 Citations
7.040 Impact Factor

Nursing stimulation is more than tactile sensation: It is a multisensory experience.

Horm Behav 2008 Aug 18;54(2):330-9. Epub 2008 Mar 18.

Department of Psychology, Northeastern University, 360 Huntington Avenue 125NI, Boston, MA 02115, USA.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.yhbeh.2008.02.024DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4915061PMC
August 2008
10 Reads
10 Citations
4.632 Impact Factor

Dopamine D1 receptor stimulation of the nucleus accumbens or the medial preoptic area promotes the onset of maternal behavior in pregnancy-terminated rats.

Behav Neurosci 2007 Oct;121(5):907-19

Department of Psychology, Boston College, Chestnut Hill, MA 02467, USA.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/0735-7044.121.5.907DOI Listing
October 2007
13 Reads
25 Citations
2.730 Impact Factor

Motivational systems and the neural circuitry of maternal behavior in the rat.

Authors:
Michael Numan

Dev Psychobiol 2007 Jan;49(1):12-21

Department of Psychology, McGuinn Hall, Boston College, 140 Commonwealth Avenue, Chestnut Hill, MA 02467, USA.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/dev.20198DOI Listing
January 2007
5 Reads
79 Citations
3.310 Impact Factor

Hypothalamic neural circuits regulating maternal responsiveness toward infants.

Authors:
Michael Numan

Behav Cogn Neurosci Rev 2006 Dec;5(4):163-90

Department of Psychology, Boston College, Chestnut Hill, MA 02467, USA.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/1534582306288790DOI Listing
December 2006
3 Reads
42 Citations

Functional magnetic resonance imaging shows oxytocin activates brain regions associated with mother-pup bonding during suckling.

J Neurosci 2005 Dec;25(50):11637-44

Department of Psychiatry, Center for Comparative NeuroImaging, University of Massachusetts Medical School, Worcester, Massachusetts 01655, USA.

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http://www.jneurosci.org/cgi/doi/10.1523/JNEUROSCI.3604-05.2
Publisher Site
http://dx.doi.org/10.1523/JNEUROSCI.3604-05.2005DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6726012PMC
December 2005
9 Reads
67 Citations
6.344 Impact Factor

Medial preoptic area interactions with the nucleus accumbens-ventral pallidum circuit and maternal behavior in rats.

Behav Brain Res 2005 Mar;158(1):53-68

Department of Psychology, Boston College, McGuinn Hall, 140 Commonwealth Avenue, Chestnut Hill, MA 02467, USA.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.bbr.2004.08.008DOI Listing
March 2005
23 Reads
32 Citations
3.030 Impact Factor

Maternal behaviors: central integration or independent parallel circuits? Theoretical comment on Popeski and Woodside (2004).

Authors:
Michael Numan

Behav Neurosci 2004 Dec;118(6):1469-72

Department of Psychology, Boston College, Chestnut Hill, MA 02467, USA.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/0735-7044.118.6.1469DOI Listing
December 2004
10 Reads
2.730 Impact Factor

A functional neuroanatomical investigation of the role of the medial preoptic area in neural circuits regulating maternal behavior.

Behav Brain Res 2002 Apr;131(1-2):17-36

Department of Biology, Boston College, Chestnut Hill, MA 02467, USA.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/s0166-4328(01)00370-9DOI Listing
April 2002
9 Reads
24 Citations
3.030 Impact Factor

Estrogen, progesterone, and pregnancy termination alter neural activity in brain regions that control maternal behavior in rats.

Neuroendocrinology 2002 Jan;75(1):12-23

Boston College, Psychology Department, Chestnut Hill, MA, USA.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1159/000048217DOI Listing
January 2002
8 Reads
10 Citations
4.373 Impact Factor

Followers

Thiago Pereira Henriques
Thiago Pereira Henriques

Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul (UFRGS)