Publications by authors named "Michael Myint"

8 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Case of intermittent testicular torsion and de-torsion captured on scrotal ultrasound.

ANZ J Surg 2021 03 6;91(3):E135-E136. Epub 2020 Aug 6.

Nepean Urology Research Group, Nepean Hospital, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/ans.16161DOI Listing
March 2021

Counting Better--The Limits and Future of Quality-Based Compensation.

N Engl J Med 2016 Aug;375(7):609-11

From Swedish Health Services, Seattle (C.R.D., M.M.), and Providence Health and Services, Renton (A.L.C.-P.) - both in Washington.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1056/NEJMp1604897DOI Listing
August 2016

A Real-World Experience With the Supera Interwoven Nitinol Stent in Femoropopliteal Arteries: Midterm Patency Results and Failure Analysis.

J Endovasc Ther 2016 Jun 22;23(3):433-41. Epub 2016 Mar 22.

Department of Vascular Surgery, Prince of Wales Hospital, Sydney, Australia The Vascular Institute, Prince of Wales, Sydney, Australia Faculty of Medicine, University of New South Wales, Sydney, Australia.

Purpose: To evaluate the safety and midterm patency of the Supera interwoven nitinol stent in a real-world population and determine deployment and patient-related factors that may predispose to loss of patency.

Methods: A retrospective analysis was conducted of 111 consecutive limbs from 97 patients (mean age 75.3 years; 68 men) with severe atherosclerotic disease of the superficial femoral and popliteal arteries that were treated with Supera stents between June 2012 and October 2014. Half the patients had claudication (56%); the remainder had rest pain (19%) and tissue loss (26%). Forty-eight (43%) lesions were chronic total occlusions, and more than half were classified as TransAtlantic Inter-Society Consensus C (22%) or D (30%).

Results: All 146 Supera stents (1.32 stents per limb) were deployed successfully, extending over a mean length of 175.5±130.5 mm to treat lesions averaging 151.5±127.1 mm long. At 30 days, Kaplan-Meier estimated freedom from death, target lesion revascularization, and amputation was 97.3%. Primary patency and freedom from clinically driven target lesion revascularization rates were 87.1% and 95.0% at 6 months, respectively, and 78.9% and 87.6% at 12 months, respectively. Four distinct mechanisms for failure were identified in the 13 limbs in which patency was lost; stent intussusception (n=4), compromised inflow or outflow (n=2), gross oversizing (n=1), and neoplastic thrombophilia (n=1); the cause of 5 occlusions could not be identified.

Conclusion: In this heterogeneous group that included long and complex atheromatous femoropopliteal lesions, the Supera stent achieved excellent clinical and patency results at 1 year. Further improvement may be achieved through careful patient selection and the avoidance of deployment pitfalls.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/1526602816639543DOI Listing
June 2016

Mobile phone applications in management of enuresis: The good, the bad, and the unreliable!

J Pediatr Urol 2016 Apr 2;12(2):112.e1-6. Epub 2015 Nov 2.

Department of Paediatric Urology, The Children's Hospital at Westmead, Westmead, Sydney, Australia.

Introduction: The proliferation of medical-type applications or 'apps' on smartphones is a typical example of the impact technology has had on medical practice. Maintaining a bladder diary is a recommended part of evaluating the effect of interventions for patients suffering from enuresis. Traditional pen-and-paper bladder diaries have poor completion rates, inconsistent patterns in data entry, and are deficient in validation. Electronic bladder diaries have been proposed to overcome these obstacles. With increasing numbers of smartphone apps available to the general public, it is important to distinguish well-designed apps for childhood enuresis.

Purpose: To identify, evaluate, and rank all available mobile-phone apps for the management of childhood enuresis.

Methods: On August 21, 2014, a search was conducted on iTunes, Android Play Store, and BlackBerry World for smartphone apps using the following search terms: bladder, bedwetting, bladder diary, enuresis, incontinence, and wetting. Apps that did not have a bladder diary function and that were unrelated to the investigation, follow-up, and treatment of childhood enuresis were excluded. Apps were rated by a paediatric urology consultant, fellow, registrar, and resident medical officer using standardised criteria including: design; ease of use; languages; quality of instructions; security; accordance with ICCS definition of enuresis; and ability to store histories; record bowel habits; transfer data to other devices; and print data.

Results: Across all three search platforms, a total of 1041 apps were identified. Only 24 were included and reviewed based on exclusion criteria. Average ratings for apps ranged from 10 to 30.75 out of 50 based on standardised criteria.

Discussion: Smartphone apps are playing an increasingly significant role in the management of enuresis in place of pen-and-paper bladder diaries. Apps available to the general public vary in quality and it can be difficult for patients to identify one appropriate for use. We found apps with higher ratings consistently had engaging interfaces, were easy to use, and defined the primary purpose clearly. Lower ratings and performance often was caused by poor quality of experience through "freezing"/"crashing."

Conclusion: Bladder diary apps can eliminate disadvantages of pen-and-paper diaries in the management of enuresis. Currently, apps available vary in quality. The three best-rated apps currently available are My Dryness Tracker, Bedwetting Tracker, and HapPee Time. There is room for medical associations to collaborate with developers for further app development.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jpurol.2015.09.011DOI Listing
April 2016

A multifaceted hospitalist quality improvement intervention: Decreased frequency of common labs.

J Hosp Med 2015 Jun 21;10(6):390-5. Epub 2015 Mar 21.

Department of Quality & Value, Swedish Medical Group, Seattle, Washington.

Purpose: Common labs such as a daily complete blood count or a daily basic metabolic panel represent possible waste and have been targeted by professional societies and the Choosing Wisely campaign for critical evaluation. We undertook a multifaceted quality-improvement (QI) intervention in a large community hospitalist group to decrease unnecessary common labs.

Methods: The QI intervention was composed of academic detailing, audit and feedback, and transparent reporting of the frequency with which common labs were ordered as daily within the hospitalist group. We performed a pre-post analysis, comparing a cohort of patients during the 10-month baseline period before the QI intervention and the 7-month intervention period. Demographic and clinical data were collected from the electronic medical record. The primary endpoint was number of common labs ordered per patient-day as estimated by a clustered multivariable linear regression model clustering by ordering hospitalist. Secondary endpoints included length of stay, hospital mortality, 30-day readmission, blood transfusion, amount of blood transfused, and laboratory cost per patient.

Results: The baseline (n = 7824) and intervention (n = 5759) cohorts were similar in their demographics, though the distribution of primary discharge diagnosis-related groups differed. At baseline, a mean of 2.06 (standard deviation 1.40) common labs were ordered per patient-day. Adjusting for age, sex, and principle discharge diagnosis, the number of common labs ordered per patient-day decreased by 0.22 (10.7%) during the intervention period compared to baseline (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.34 to 0.11; P < 0.01). There were nonsignificant reductions in hospital mortality in the intervention period compared to baseline (2.2% vs 1.8%, P = 0.1) as well as volume of blood transfused in patients who received a transfusion (127.2 mL decrease; 95% CI, -257.9 to 3.6; P = 0.06). No effect was seen on length of stay or readmission rate. The intervention decreased hospital direct costs by an estimated $16.19 per admission or $151,682 annualized (95% CI, $119,746 to $187,618).

Conclusion: Implementation of a multifaceted QI intervention within a community-based hospitalist group was associated with a significant, but modest, decrease in the number of ordered lab tests and hospital costs. No effect was seen on hospital length of stay, mortality, or readmission rate. This intervention suggests that a community-based hospitalist QI intervention focused on daily labs can be effective in safely reducing healthcare waste without compromising quality of care.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/jhm.2354DOI Listing
June 2015

Congenital anterior urethral diverticulum: antenatal diagnosis with subsequent neonatal endoscopic management.

Urology 2015 Apr 19;85(4):914-7. Epub 2015 Feb 19.

School of Women's & Children's Health, UNSW Medicine, University of New South Wales, Sydney, Australia; Department of Maternal Fetal Medicine, Royal Hospital for Women, Randwick, Sydney, Australia.

Congenital anterior urethral diverticulum is a rare cause of urethral obstruction in boys. We report on the antenatal diagnosis of this rare phenomenon, making this the sixth prenatally diagnosed case in the English literature (to the best of our knowledge). Our initial prenatal assessment, postnatal endoscopic management, along with the eventual clinical course is outlined. The embryologic theories, differential diagnosis, literature review, imaging, and treatment modalities of this entity are discussed.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.urology.2014.12.015DOI Listing
April 2015

Laparoscopic pyelolithotomy and pyeloplasty in a horseshoe kidney.

ANZ J Surg 2015 Jun 20;85(6):492-3. Epub 2013 Nov 20.

Department of Urology, Gosford District Hospital, Gosford, New South Wales, Australia.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/ans.12458DOI Listing
June 2015

Relapse of secondary syphilis after benzathine penicillin G: molecular analysis.

Sex Transm Dis 2004 Mar;31(3):196-9

Department of Medicine (Infectious Diseases), University of Washington School of Medicine, Seattle, Washington, USA.

Background And Objectives: It is difficult to distinguish between relapse and reinfection in patients who develop a second episode of syphilis after treatment.

Goal: The goal of this study was to use molecular methods to distinguish between relapse and reinfection in a patient with recurrent secondary syphilis.

Study Design: Treponema pallidum tprK sequences were amplified from cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), skin, and blood from the initial presentation and from blood from the second presentation. Neighbor-joining clustering analysis was performed for deduced tprK sequences from the case patient and for sequences derived from blood and CSF of a different patient with secondary syphilis.

Results: The case patient's tprK sequences from both episodes of syphilis clustered together with a high degree of similarity.

Conclusion: Our patient likely relapsed despite treatment.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/01.olq.0000114941.37942.4cDOI Listing
March 2004